Global Daily News

  • IT staffing feeling effects of Covid-19, long-term impact unknown

    The IT staffing sector is feeling the effects of the Covid-19 pandemic, with many clients needing their consultants to work from home and everyone being concerned about staying healthy. Covid-19 is hitting client industries, although some are faring a bit better than others. Among IT staffing firms, they are seeing reductions in demand and some clients are taking longer to pay. Concerns have also arisen about IT operations in India, which is on lockdown.For now, the full scope of the damage of Covid-19 remains unknown, as does its duration. Then there are the legislative relief packages emerging from Congress, with their own unknowns.“Obviously it’s going to have a significant adverse impact,” said Mark Roberts, CEO of the TechServe Alliance, a trade association of the IT and engineering staffing and solutions industry. “A lot of folks are engaged in planning for various scenarios and continuing to assess the situation on a day by day basis.”The full article is in Staffing Industry Review Online, and it can be accessed for free. […]

  • Hudson Q4 revenue jumps with Australian deal, but Covid-19 affecting demand

    Hudson Global Inc. (NASDAQ: HSON) reported revenue jumped 56.6% in the fourth quarter ended Dec. 31 in constant currency at the Old Greenwich, Connecticut-headquartered provider of recruitment process outsourcing services and contingent workforce solutions.Its Asia Pacific operations drove growth, thanks to a previously announced large contract signed in the second quarter of 2019. Under the deal, Hudson is managing a portion of the contingent workforce at a large, Asia-based tech company.More recently, Hudson reported the Covid-19 pandemic has led to an initial reduction in demand.“Some of our customers have instituted hiring freezes, while other customers that are more capable of working remotely have been allowed to operate as usual. The expected timeline for this reduction in demand for our services remains uncertain and difficult to predict considering the rapidly evolving landscape.” (US$ thousands) Q4 2019 Q4 2018 % change % constant currency Revenue $25,448 $16,575 53.5% 56.6% Gross margin percentage 43.7% 61.9%     Net income/loss $1,483 ($620) nm             While Asia-Pacific revenue nearly doubled, Americas revenue fell in the fourth quarter. Revenue by geography (US$ thousands) Q4 2019 Q4 2018 % change Hudson Americas $2,933 $3,124 -6.1% Hudson Asia Pacific $17,869 $9,215 93.9% Hudson Europe $4,646 $4,236 9.7% Full-year results (US$ thousands) 2019 2018 % change % constant currency Revenue $93,811 $66,932 40.2% 46.5% Gross margin percentage 46.4% 62.9%     Net loss/income ($955) $7,867 nm   Share price and market capShares in Hudson were up 14.38% to $8.75 as of 10:19 a.m. Eastern time; the company had a market cap of $22.5 million, according to FT.com. […]

  • Consumer Confidence Index posts sharp decline

    The Conference Board’s Consumer Confidence Index fell sharply in March amid the Covid-19 pandemic, extreme volatility in the financial markets, a surge in jobless claims and increased uncertainty about the economy.“March’s decline in confidence is more in line with a severe contraction — rather than a temporary shock — and further declines are sure to follow,” said Lynn Franco, senior director of economic indicators at The Conference Board.The Consumer Confidence Index fell to a reading of 120.0 in March, down from a reading of 132.6 in February. […]

  • Group begins turning in signatures in effort to stop AB 5 misclassification law

    The group Protect App-Based Drivers & Services began turning in signatures to local county registrars of voters in California. The signatures are needed to place a ballot measure before that state’s voters that would allow drivers for Uber Technologies Inc., Lyft Inc. and others to remain independent contractors even under California’s AB 5 measure, which makes independent contractor classification more difficult.Last month, the group announced it received 1 million signatures to place the measure on the state ballot. It had needed just 623,212.Backers of the coalition include human cloud firms Uber, Lyft, DoorDash, Instacart and Postmates.But the ballot measure is facing some resistance. San Francisco County Supervisors Gordon Marr and Matt Haney wrote an opinion article in the San Francisco Examiner newspaper on Monday calling for the human cloud firms to drop their support of the measure against AB 5. […]

  • US Chamber of Commerce releases guide to help small businesses, gig economy ICs access federal aid

    The US Chamber of Commerce announced it has created a guide to help gig economy independent contractors and small businesses file for relief under the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act.Its guide is available here.“This comprehensive guide ensures small business owners fully understand what aid is available to them and how to access those funds as quickly as possible,” said Suzanne Clark, president of the US Chamber of Commerce. […]

  • South Africa – Workforce Holdings full year revenue rises 7%, but profits slide

    South African recruitment and outsourcing company Workforce Holdings (WKF: JSE) reported revenue today for the year ending 31 December 2019 of ZAR 3.2 billion (USD 180.6 million), up 7.1% when compared to the previous year.The 2018 results have been restated due to the adoption of IFRS 16 using the full retrospective method during the year. (ZAR millions) FY 2019 FY 2018 Change FY 2019 (USD millions) Revenue 3,227.0 3,014.4 7.0% 180.6 Gross Profit 702.4 693.7 1.2% 39.3 Gross Margin 21.7% 23.0% - - EBITDA 140.9 173.9 -18.9% 7.9 Profit Before Tax 99.0 104.7 -5.4% 5.5 Profit After Tax 98.1 102.9 -4.6% 5.4 The group cited a challenging operating environment.The group said its staffing and outsourcing cluster had to navigate previous uncertainty relating to the deeming provision, the introduction of a minimum wage and a depressed employment market. The deeming provision refers to a section of the 198A of Labour Relations Act (LRA) which states that the client of a staffing provider is deemed to be the sole employer of assigned temporary employees earning ZAR 17,119 (USD 969) or less per month, following three months of employment.Revenue from staffing and outsourcing increased by 6% to ZAR 2.6 billion (USD 145.6 million).The training cluster saw an increase of 16% in revenue to ZAR 286.4 million (USD 16.0 million).At the same time, the healthcare cluster saw an increase of revenue by 11% to ZAR 274.0 million (USD 15.3 million).The financial services cluster saw a decline in revenue of 7% to ZAR 94.2 million (USD 5.2 million).In January 2020 the group acquired Chartall Business College.“At the time of writing, the Covid-19 pandemic has created an unprecedented global crisis and an uncertain and unpredictable business environment for the entire South African economy,” the company stated. “We have taken steps to protect the income of our employees using both internal resources and those that have been made available by government. We have also been proactive in securing ongoing cash flow for the business by focusing on overhead reduction, cash preservation and stringent credit management.”“Despite the national lockdown negatively impacting some of our clients and certain of our business activities, we also have a fair portion of clients and our own business clusters that are deemed to be essential services and we are experiencing strong demand in these areas. Considering these factors, management is confident that the business has the necessary capabilities and resources in place to cope with this situation,” Workforce Holdings stated.As of last trade Workforce traded at ZAR 115, down 9.4% on the day. Based on its current share price the company has a market value of ZAR 280.29 million (USD 15.7 million). […]

  • World – Hudson Q4 revenue rises 56.6% in constant currency, company returns to profitability

    US-based RPO provider Hudson Global Inc. (NASD: HSON) reported revenue rose 56.6% in constant currency for the fourth quarter ended 31 December 2019. Revenue rose in the Asia Pacific and European regions, while growth in Hudson Americas fell. (USD thousands) Q4 2019 Q4 2018 % change % constant currency Revenue 25,448 16,575 53.5% 56.6% Gross margin percentage 519 (610) N/A N/A Net loss 1,483 (620) N/A N/A Revenue by geography  (USD thousands) Q4 2019 Q4 2018 % change % constant currency Hudson Americas 2,933 3,124 -6.1% -6.2% Hudson Asia Pacific 17,869 9,215 93.9% 101.1% Hudson Europe 4,646 4,236 9.7% 9.5%  In the Americas Hudson said a strong performance at several newly-won clients was offset by lower volumes at some existing clients.  EBITDA was breakeven in the fourth quarter of 2019 down from $0.1 million last year. In Europe, EBITDA was $0.2 million in the fourth quarter of 2019 compared to an EBITDA loss of $0.3 million a year ago.In Asia Pacific revenue growth in the fourth quarter of 2019 was driven by a significant contract in Australia signed in the second quarter of 2019 to manage a portion of the contingent workforce for a large Asia-based technology company. EBITDA was $1.1 million in the fourth quarter of 2019 compared to EBITDA of $0.7 million a year ago.Hudson also reported full year revenue of $93.8 million, an increase of 40.2% from 2018, or 46.5% in constant currency.“We delivered solid growth in the fourth quarter, particularly in Europe and Australia,” said Jeff Eberwein, CEO at Hudson Global.  “In addition, we are pleased to report positive adjusted EBITDA, cash flow from operations, and net income for the fourth quarter.  For the full year, we delivered revenue growth while also reducing corporate costs enabling us to generate positive adjusted EBITDA for 2019, a milestone event for our company.”Earlier this month Hudson announced that its business may be adversely impacted by the recent Covid-19 outbreak and the accompanying economic downturn. “This downturn, as well as the uncertainty regarding the duration, spread and intensity of the outbreak, has led to an initial reduction in demand for our services.  Some of our customers have instituted hiring freezes, while other customers that are more capable of working remotely have been allowed to operate as usual.  The expected timeline for this reduction in demand for our services remains uncertain and difficult to predict considering the rapidly evolving landscape,” the company stated.The company added that it is vigilantly monitoring the situation surrounding Covid-19 and will continue to proactively address this situation as it evolves.  Hudson said it is confident that it can continue to take appropriate actions to manage the business in this challenging environment due to the flexibility of its workforce and the strength of its balance sheet.In trading yesterday Hudson Global shares closed at $7.65, up 10.39% on the day and 26.24% above the 52 week low of $6.06 set on 18 March 2020. Based on its current share price the company has a market value of $22.49 million. […]

  • World – Adecco, Kelly, ManpowerGroup and Randstad unite in worker data blockchain initiative with WEC

    The World Employment Confederation, an international organisation representing the staffing industry, and its corporate members announced a blockchain initiative aimed at developing a common set of worker data that can reside on a block.The initiative also calls for developing guidelines on how staffing companies can use the data to make it easier for people to enter or re-enter the workforce.Corporate members include The Adecco Group, Gi Group, Kelly Services Inc., ManpowerGroup Inc., Randstad NV and RGF Staffing.Executive Director Global Research for Staffing Industry Analysts, John Nurthen, commented: “We have been following the development of credentialing services built on blockchain for some time and are aware of 30 such initiatives globally. It is a very positive step that the WEC and its corporate members are now collaborating in this area as it could help to deliver efficiencies and cost-savings for the whole staffing industry. The verification of candidate data is a duplicate cost every time a candidate registers with a new staffing firm so any process where reliable data (career history, references, qualifications, testing, etc) can be easily accessed is to be welcomed”.As part of the initiative, the WEC and the companies agreed on a set of points: “That because so many individuals enter, or re-enter, the workforce through our industry, we share an obligation to make that experience a positive and trusted one for all candidates, workers and employers. “That blockchain technology offers unique capabilities to enhance both data privacy and data sharing across the ecosystem of solution providers involved in connecting people with work. “That a fundamental shift has occurred, requiring all involved in the industry to recognize that the personal data we collect about individual candidates and workers as part of the businesses we run, remains, at the core, the property of the candidate and worker. “That a lack of standards in the data collected from candidates and workers is a contributor to the inefficiency and poor experience consistently identified in the hiring processes. “That we are at a point in time where taking action as a collective industry body is both positive for our businesses individually and for society collectively. “That there is now an available technology mechanism that can address the data privacy, experience of the worker and customer and control of personal data business challenges effectively; therefore, defining a standard is in the best interest of all stakeholders.”  “The World Employment Confederation and its corporate members are ready to work with all stakeholders active in the field of blockchain technology and its applications in employment services in order to create a positive and trusted experience for candidates, workers and employers,” the WEC stated.Staffing Industry Analysts’ report ‘Trends in Digital Credentialing’ can be accessed by our research members here. […]

  • World – Staffing 360 delays earnings amid coronavirus pandemic, but reaffirms FY revenue guidance

    Staffing 360 Solutions Inc. (NASDAQ: STAF), a staffing provider with operations in the US and UK, announced in a regulatory filing that it is delaying the release of financial results for the year ended 28 December 2019 because of the Covid-19 pandemic.It now plans to release results no later than May 11. In addition, the group said earlier guidance should not be relied upon given the fast-changing nature of the pandemic. Staffing 360 said it still plans to report revenue of $278.5 million for the year, up 6.7% from the previous year.“This is a unique environment in which we find ourselves. We are working diligently to keep up with the changing landscape and are providing support to all of our employees, to all of our candidates and to our clients,” Chairman and CEO Brendan Flood said.In response, to Covid-19, the company will cease issuance of its quarterly dividend and take a more cautious view of acquisitions going forward.Flood is also currently working for no salary and the company is reviewing its overhead base and rightsizing in both the US and the UK. The company is continuing to monitor the impact of Covid-19 on a daily basis.In its updated guidance, the Staffing 360 added that the recent change in the IR35 legislation in the UK has been beneficial to the company going forward. The stimulus packages being offered by the US and the UK governments are also being reviewed and will be acted upon where possible.Staffing 360 noted its professional staffing contractors are principally working remotely and are still billing. In addition, the company’s commercial staffing clients are mostly, but not all, in the food manufacturing supply chain, which provides some degree of revenue protection as it is considered an essential business. […]

  • Singapore – Government announces Resilience Budget to support workers and businesses

    Singapore’s government last week introduced measures worth over SGD 48 billion (USD 33.6 billion) in a ‘Resilience Budget’, to support workers, businesses, and households amid the Covid-19 epidemic.The supplementary Budget is in addition to the SGD 6.4 billion (USD 4.48 billion) in measures that the government announced just over a month ago as a response to the Covid-19 outbreak. Overall Singapore is dedicating nearly SGD 55 billion (USD 38.5 billion) to combat the coronavirus, amounting to approximately 11% of the country’s GDP.Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Finance, Heng Swee Keat, said in the statement, “Our immediate priority is to save jobs, support our workers, and protect livelihoods. Over one-third of the Resilience Budget is dedicated to this.”The Budget focuses on three key points: First, save jobs, support workers, and protect livelihoods. The second key point is to help enterprises overcome immediate challenges and the third is to strengthen economic and social resilience.The Jobs Support Scheme will be extended with payouts in May, July and October. The government will co-fund 25% of local workers’ wages until December 2020. In heavily impacted industries like air transport, tourism and food services, firms will receive higher co-funding at 50% to 75% of wages. This will be subject to a monthly wage cap of SGD 4,600 (USD 3,227) per employee. The Jobs Support Scheme will be extended, with payouts in May, July and October.A total of SGD 15.1 billion (USD 10.6 billion) will be allocated to support more than 1.9 million local jobs, so employers are urged to help keep their workers.The Budget also introduced a new Self-Employed Person Income Relief Scheme (SIRS) will help provide direct cash assistance to the self-employed. Eligible self-employed persons will receive SGD 1,000 (USD 700) cash every month for 9 months.Meanwhile, the Self-Employed Persons Training Support scheme will provide sustained support for them to make use of this period to train and upskill. Up to 90% of course fees will be subsidised, and from 1 May 2020, the training allowance will be SGD 10 (USD 7) per hour. In addition, there will be an automatic deferment of income tax payment for three months.Incomes of low wage workers will be supplemented through the Workfare Income Supplement Scheme. Workfare recipients will receive an enhanced Workfare Special Payment, a one-off cash payment of SGD 3,000 (USD 2,104).The Budget also announced a SGD 145 million (USD 101.7 million) package that will support those who had lost jobs because of Covid-19.The SGUnited Jobs initiative will create about 10,000 jobs over the next one year. The public sector will take the lead, and the government will work with the Singapore Business Federation and other Trade Associations and Chambers to identify private sector job opportunities. […]

  • Australia – Government announces massive jobs stimulus package

    Australia’s government announced an AUD 130 billion (USD 79.3 billion) stimulus package which aims to help keep Australians in jobs and tackle the significant economic impact from the coronavirus.The AUD 130 billion (USD 79.3 billion) JobKeeper payment will provide a historic wage subsidy to around six million workers who will receive a flat payment of AUD 1,500 (USD 916) per fortnight through their employer, before tax. It provides the equivalent of around 70% of the national median wage and will be open to eligible businesses that receive a significant financial hit caused by the coronavirus.The payment will ensure eligible employers and employees stay connected while some businesses move into hibernation. Prime Minister Scott Morrison said the JobKeeper payment would bring the government’s total economic support for the economy to AUD 320 billion (USD 195.4 billion) or 16.4% of GDP.“We will give millions of eligible businesses and their workers a lifeline to not only get through this crisis, but bounce back together on the other side,” Morrisson said. “This is about keeping the connection between the employer and the employee and keeping people in their jobs even though the business they work for may go into hibernation and close down for six months.”“When the economy comes back, these businesses will be able to start again and their workforce will be ready to go because they will remain attached to the business through our JobKeeper payment,” Morrisson added.The JobKeeper Payment is a subsidy to businesses, which will keep more Australians in jobs through the course of the coronavirus outbreak.  The payment will be paid to employers, for up to six months, for each eligible employee that was on their books on 1 March 2020 and is retained or continues to be engaged by that employer. The program launched yesterday 30 March 2020.Full time and part time employees, including stood down employees, would be eligible to receive the JobKeeper Payment.  Where a casual employee has been with their employer for at least the previous 12 months they will also be eligible for the Payment.  An employee will only be eligible to receive this payment from one employer. The government also announced that over the next six months it is temporarily expanding access to income support payments and establishing a Coronavirus Supplement of AUD 550 (USD 335) per fortnight. […]

  • Australia – People Infrastructure says some of its specialist services businesses hit by Covid-19

    People Infrastructure Ltd (ASX: PPE) (“Company”), an Australian-based workforce management company provided an update on the impact that Covid-19 and associated government mandated counter measures has had on its business.Declan Sherman, People Infrastructure’s Managing Director said, “From a business perspective, there is a high level of uncertainty with respect to the current operating environment in which People Infrastructure participates, however People Infrastructure is a diversified organisation servicing clients across a broad range of sectors.”“As documented in our FY 2020 first half results, approximately 51% of our business is generated by healthcare and community services, 22% from information technology and 27% from a diversified collection of staffing and specialist services businesses,” Sherman said. “Some of these specialist services businesses have been recently negatively impacted by Covid-19 including our hospitality pay-rolling business and our childcare staffing business.”“Although it continues to be a volatile working environment and very difficult to predict the immediate impact that Covid-19 will have on our business, the great majority of People Infrastructure’s clients are large corporations, government or government backed organisations and not-for-profits who are well positioned to manage the current crisis and continue to utilise People Infrastructure workforce solutions,” Sherman said. “We provide a critical service to these organisations (classified as an essential service where our clients provide an essential service) and expect to benefit from strong demand once the economy recovers from the current situation.”Sherman added that “People Infrastructure continues to generate profits, it currently has significant headroom under its debt facilities and does not expect, based on current information, that it will need to either increase its debt facilities or raise capital to see out the current uncertain situation. Yesterday it paid its interim dividend of AUD 0.04 (USD 0.02) per share announced as part of the release of its 2020 H1 results. Its normalised net debt to EBITDA ratio at 31 December 2019 was 1.1x.&rdquo […]

  • Philippines – Displaced workers due to Covid-19 crisis nearing 500,000 (Inquirer.net)

    Almost 500,000 workers in the Philippines have so far been displaced by the coronavirus disease crisis reports the Inquirer.net citing data from the Department of Labour and Employment. In a statement, Labour Secretary Silvestre Bello III said that 9,028 establishments have reported that 317,171 of their workers have been displaced due to temporary closures or by flexible work arrangements as of 27 March. Meanwhile, preliminary field reports showed that another 117,890 informal sector workers have also been affected, Bello added. Because of this, Bello directed DOLE regional offices and implementers of DOLE key assistance programs to  “relax requirements and exercise flexibility” in processing establishment reports for the release of assistance. […]

Latest Research

  • A Look At the Workforce Environment in the United States of America

    Key Points: The U.S. remains the World’s largest market in terms of revenue generated by temporary agency work. The US ranks 55th in the world for ease of starting a business but is 6th in terms of ease of doing business according to the World Bank rankings for 2020. The U.S. is one of the most liberal staffing markets in the world but the complex interplay between federal, state and local laws creates administrative burden for employers. Rules governing the use and provision of labor and temporary labor are found throughout U.S. federal and state legal sources. This report covers the commercial requirements for setting up and running a staffing business in the U.S., the different models of supplying contingent worker solutions, contingent worker rights and legal risks related to employee screening, data protection, health and safety etc. Legal Disclaimer: This report is provided solely for the purposes of information and should not be considered legal advice. It is recommended to seek the advice of qualified legal counsel before taking action.To download a pdf copy of this report, click below: A Look at the Workforce Environment in the United States of America 20200331 - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • Workforce Solutions Webinar – Best Practices for Successful Contingent Workforce Business Continuity Planning

    Sponsored by Beeline Covid-19 has given organizations a need to test and even operationalize their business continuity plans as they provide rapid response and action in safeguarding their workforce. As the number of contingent workers within your organization continues to grow, it is important to consider this significant population within your strategies to ensure a successful and comprehensive continuity response. Moderator:Adrianne Nelson, Sr. Director, Global Membership Products, Staffing Industry Analysts Speakers:Chris Paden, Director of Contingent Workforce Strategies & Research (The Americas), CCWP, Staffing Industry AnalystsAutumn Labadie Vaupel, Chief Operating Officer, BeelineDownload presentation (PDF)Watch webinar video below. […]

  • By what metrics should staff be measured?

    Key Findings: Internal staff were asked: “Of the metrics currently used to measure your performance, are there any you would say are not very fair or meaningful? By what metrics do you think productivity for your role should be measured?” The questions were open-ended; staff could make any suggestions they deemed best. Over 11,000 internal staff answered these questions. Results from a randomized subset of these responses were analyzed to identify patterns for each of 15 separate occupations, revealing metrics recommendations for each. Recommendations were naturally different for different occupations, but some general observations may also be made. Roughly four-fifths of internal staff are satisfied with how their performance is being measured -- but one in five internal staff are either not satisfied with the metrics by which they are judged or simply have no idea what those metrics are. This suggests the need for more buy-in and communication. Call counts and call times were generally the least appreciated metric. Many commented that such metrics are out-of-date given that so much communication happens now via emails, texts, etc., and because many people will not answer a phone number unknown to them. Some respondents commented that metrics should be applied in hierarchical fashion, in particular that end-goal metrics (placements, revenue, gross margin, etc.) should be the primary measures, but that when employees (particularly new employees) failed to meet the end-goal metrics, then activity-type metrics (calls, meetings, interviews, submittals, etc.) were appropriate as a fallback. To access the complete report, please select the link below: North America Internal Staff Survey 2020 By what metrics should staff be measured 20200326 - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • Americas COVID-19 Legal Update

    In this report, we provide links to information and guidance for employers and workforce solutions providers across North and Latin America. With the rapidly changing status of COVID-19 internationally, you should be aware that some of the advice and guidance in the links provided may have been superseded or updated: General Guidance and Information North America Canada United States Latin America Brazil Colombia Costa Rica Mexico. Puerto Rico Legal Disclaimer: This update is provided solely for the purposes of information and should not be considered legal advice. It is always recommended to seek the advice of qualified legal counsel before taking action.To download a pdf copy of this update, click below: Americas_COVID19_Legal Update 20200325 - You do not have permission to view this object. General Guidance and Information Business ContinuityBusiness continuity can be defined as 'the processes, procedures, decisions and activities to ensure that an organization can continue to function through an operational interruption.’ContinuityCentral.com provides updates on business continuity, enterprise risk and resilienceSteps Companies Should Take to Protect Themselves from the Legal Fallout of the Coronavirus, Jones Day HealthWorld Health Organization (WHO) North America CanadaCOVID-19 and workplace government updates: Fasken provides a daily Workplace Wrap-up on COVID-19 measures across CanadaLittler’s Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) are designed to address some of the more common questions that employers with operations in Canada currently face.Employers are also encouraged to consult relevant guidance and FAQs issued by the Canadian government: Health information and advice Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) – Benefits and services Canadian Federal Government has made changes to Employment Insurance Sickness Benefits and the Work-Sharing Program. These are summarized by Littler here. Canada’s COVID-19 Economic Response Plan: On March 18, 2020, the Prime Minister announced a new set of economic measures to help stabilize the economy during this challenging period. These measures, delivered as part of the Government of Canada’s COVID-19 Economic Response Plan, will provide up to $27 billion in direct support to Canadian workers and businesses. United States Compliance issuesCOVID-19 and Immigration Updates: Form I-9 Guidance, Border Closures, and More This article briefly summarizes the recent governmental guidance on Form I-9 requirements, travel, and visa processing and services, among other matters, in response to the national emergency caused by the COVID-19 outbreak.  As this is a very fluid and rapidly changing situation, employers should monitor the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) websites and consult with their employment immigration counsel to ascertain whether the guidance has evolved, warranting a reassessment of business strategies.COVID-19: Q&A Specific to Staffing Seyfarth Shaw have produced a guide for staffing firms. Changes in employee roles, furloughs and layoffsEmployment Considerations for Responding to the Coronavirus (Michael Best) - This article addresses some of the Human Resources issues that the coronavirus epidemic presents to U.S. employers.Thinking It Through: Wage and Hour Implications of Employer Responses to the Coronavirus (Littler) This article describes some of the U.S. wage and hour implications resulting from employers’ measures addressing the COVID-19 outbreak, including compensation for employees who are quarantined or furloughed, business expense reimbursement, reporting time pay, and predictive scheduling laws.What You Should Know About the ADA, the Rehabilitation Act, and COVID-19 The EEOC enforces workplace anti-discrimination laws including the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and the Rehabilitation Act, including the requirement for reasonable accommodation and rules about medical examinations and inquiries. Working from home: health and safetyWhat Are Employers’ Legal Responsibilities for the Safety of an Employee’s Home Workplace? An employer who requires or permits employees to work from their homes has limited responsibilities for the safety and health of the employee’s working conditions. In this article from the National Law Review, Ogletree, Deakins, Nash, Smoak & Stewart, P.C. explain what they are.Is COVID-19 Recordable or Reportable to OSHA? In this article Jackson Lewis plc provide some answers to address employer concerns about recordkeeping and reporting to OSHA COVID-19 employee illnesses. SecurityCybersecurity, Data Privacy, and Compliance Issues Related to Remote Workers With this unexpected increase in remote workers, many companies are pushing the limits of their existing remote access technology or deploying ad hoc technology and access solutions as quickly as possible. Seyfarth set out some essential things to know about the security risks posed by remote or at-home workers, and a Technical Checklist for remote employees to make sure your corporate data is safe, and you do not risk compliance challenges with data privacy law and requirements. Sick leave, sick pay and benefitsOn March 18, 2020 President Trump signed the Families First Coronavirus Response Act providing $100 billion funding for those affected financially by COVID-19. It will go into effect on April 2, (15 days after enactment) and remains in force until December 31, 2020. On March 24, U.S. Department of Labor published guidance explaining paid sick leave and expanded family and medical leave under the Families First Coronavirus Response ActThe main points are as follows: Qualified need related to a public health emergency (reason) for leave: The employee is unable to work due to a need for leave to care for their child because the school or day care has been closed or the childcare provider is unavailable due to a public health emergency. A “public health emergency” here means an emergency with respect to COVID-19 declared by a federal, state, or local authority. Pay: Not less than two-thirds of the employee’s regular pay, up to $200/day and $10,000 over the benefit period. The first 10 days taken may be unpaid, but the employee may use other paid leave during that period, if available. Duration of leave: 12 weeks, which includes job protection as required in the Family and Medical Leave Act (including amendments to it made by this Act with regard to job protection requirements for an employer who employs fewer than 25 employees). Benefits are not retroactive. Eligible employees: Employee must have worked for the employer for at least 30 days. Employees shall provide the employer with such notice of leave as is practicable. An employer of an employee who is a health care provider or emergency responder may elect to exclude such an employee. Applicable employers: Private businesses with Authority given to the Secretary of Labor: To exclude certain health care providers or emergency responders from the definition of eligible employees and to exempt small businesses with fewer than 50 employees if compliance with the requirements would jeopardize the viability of the business as a going concern. In tandem, the Emergency Paid Sick Leave Act was enacted on March 18, 2020. It also goes into effect on April 2 and remains in force until December 31, 2020. This act applies to, and provides paid sick leave for, all employees (both full and part-time) of covered employers, regardless of the employee’s duration of employment, who are unable to work or telework because of the need to take emergency sick leave. It provides: Qualified reasons for emergency paid sick time leave: An employee is unable to work or telework due to a need for leave because the employee is: subject to quarantine or isolation order, has been advised by a health care provider to self-quarantine due to coronavirus concerns, or is experiencing symptoms of coronavirus and seeking a medical diagnosis. Pay: Employee’s regular pay, up to $511/day and $5,110 over the benefit period. Other qualified reasons for paid sick time leave: An employee is unable to work or telework due to a need for leave because the employee is: caring for an individual who is subject to quarantine or isolation order or has been advised by a health care provider to self-quarantine due to coronavirus concerns; caring for their child if their school or day care has been closed, or the child care provider is unavailable, due to coronavirus precautions; or is experiencing “any other substantially similar condition specified by” the Secretary of Health and Human Services in consultation with the Secretaries of the Treasury and Labor. Pay: Two-thirds of the employee’s regular pay, up to $200/day and $2,000 over the benefit period. Duration and use of leave: An employee shall be entitled to paid sick time of 80 hours for full-time employees and an amount equal to the average number of hours such employee works over a 2-week period for part-time employees. Paid sick leave is available for immediate use and does not require a waiting period or accrual. Benefits are not retroactive. An employer may require that after the first workday or portion thereof an employee receives such leave, an employee follow reasonable notice procedures in order to continue receiving such paid sick time. An employer may not require an employee to use other paid leave provided by the employer to the employee before the employee uses the paid sick time provided under this section for the reasons above. Paid sick time shall not carry over from 1 year to the next. Employers may not require, as a condition of providing such paid sick time, that the employee involved search for or find a replacement employee to cover the hours during which the employee is using paid sick time. Applicable employers: Private businesses with Authority given to the Secretary of Labor: To exclude certain health care providers or emergency responders from the definition of eligible employees and to exempt small businesses with fewer than 50 employees if compliance with the requirements would jeopardize the viability of the business as a going concern. U.S. businesses with fewer than 500 employees will be entitled to claim a series of refundable tax credits if they are required to provide the Emergency FMLA and paid sick leave. allowed against the employer portion of the Social Security taxes. To take advantage of the paid leave credits, businesses can keep and access funds they would otherwise pay to the IRS in payroll taxes. Employers will only be reimbursed if their costs for qualified sick leave or qualified family leave wages exceed the taxes they would owe. Equivalent credits are available to self-employed individuals based on similar circumstancesFurther details of the provisions for sick pay and leave and tax credits are set out in an article by Varnum LLP for the National Law Review.NOTE: The small business exemption for employers with under 50 employees does not apply to staffing firms with more than 50 employees including temporary staff. ASA is lobbying for the definition of a small staffing business to mirror that used by the Small Business Administration of annual revenue not exceeding $30 million.Coronavirus and Benefit Plan Offerings (Michael Best) - As a result of COVID-19, the markets have dropped precipitously and remain volatile – and 401(k) investors are reacting as may be anticipated – running for the hills. Moreover, employees may have heightened concerns about access to appropriate care and treatment if they and their loved ones are impacted. This article provides a few key points to consider from a benefit plan perspective. Supply Chain and Commercial IssuesManaging the Commercial Impact of the Coronavirus: What Claims In-House Counsel Should Expect in the Near Future At the center of the financial impact is the growing disruption to worldwide supply chains across many industries. Foley has put together guidance on some of the potential claims an in-house counsel might expect to see in the wake of the coronavirus outbreak.The Coronavirus: Protecting Your Business from a Sick Supply Chain Michael Best provides advice for manufacturers, distributors, dealers, and parts suppliers who want to avoid or minimize the business impacts and exposure to liability due to the impacts of the virus on the supply chain. Latin America BrazilBrazil declared a state of public disaster (Legislative Decree # 88/2020) on March 18, 2020, which will allow the government to spend beyond the annual budget to assist with health needs and to support employment. The day before, Brazil’s Minister of Economy, Paulo Guedes, announced several measures to mitigate the economic impacts of the coronavirus, which is estimated to have reached R$147 billion. Meanwhile, some large cities in Brazil have implemented their own restrictions to help limit the virus’ spread. Littler explains how the government is reacting to the crisis. ColombiaCOLOMBIA: COVID-19 (Coronavirus) – Employer FAQs Littler provides guidance to address some of the more common questions that employers with operations in Colombia currently face. Costa RicaCOSTA RICA: COVID-19 (Coronavirus) – Employer FAQs Littler provides guidance to address some of the more common questions that employers with operations in Costa Rica currently face. MexicoMinistries of Health and Labor Issue Action Guide for Workplaces against COVID-19 On March 20, 2020, Mexico Ministry of Labor issued an Action Guide for Workplaces against COVID-19 (the “Guide”), recommending steps for employers.MEXICO: COVID-19 (Coronavirus) – Employer FAQs Littler provides guidance to address some of the more common questions that employers with operations in Mexico currently face. Puerto RicoOn March 13, 2020, Puerto Rico’s Department of Labor and Human Resources’ Secretary, Hon. Briseida Torres Reyes, issued Opinion 2020-01 discussing statutory rights and other applicable measures in light of the coronavirus (COVID-19) emergency. Littler sets out the key takeaways from Opinion 2020-01. […]

  • Workforce Solutions Webinar – Best Practices for Successful Contingent Workforce Business Continuity Planning

    Sponsored by Beeline Covid-19 has given organizations a need to test and even operationalize their business continuity plans as they provide rapid response and action in safeguarding their workforce. As the number of contingent workers within your organization continues to grow, it is important to consider this significant population within your strategies to ensure a successful and comprehensive continuity response. Moderator:Adrianne Nelson, Sr. Director, Global Membership Products, Staffing Industry Analysts Speakers:Chris Paden, Director of Contingent Workforce Strategies & Research (The Americas), CCWP, Staffing Industry AnalystsAutumn Labadie Vaupel, Chief Operating Officer, BeelineDownload presentation (PDF)Watch webinar video below. […]

  • Market Snapshot Italy

    Our Market Snapshots provide an executive summary of the international staffing markets in EMEA and APAC.  They can be used as a barometer to assess the relative business environment within each market and are designed to help you whether you are a buyer or supplier of contingent labour; looking to move into a new market place or need to understand the different national factors you will encounter in managing your workforce internationally. You can download the entire report here:  Market Snapshot Italy - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • UK Job Retention Scheme

    Many staffing firms in the UK have seen their work drop dramatically. Leaving firms in financial difficulty as they try to keep their staff and pay their overheads. Under the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme, all UK employers with a PAYE scheme will be able to access support to continue paying part of their employees’ salary for those employees that would otherwise have been laid off during this crisis. This support can be backdated to 1st March and is due to run for the next three months but will be extended if necessary according to the Government.To take advantage of this scheme, you should consider the following steps: Step 1. Companies must designate affected employees as ‘furloughed workers,’ and notify these employees of this change preferably in writing setting out a) the date the furlough starts, b) when it will be reviewed and c) how to keep in contact during the furlough. Employees will remain employed while furloughed. However, to qualify for the scheme, they must not undertake any work for the employer while under this status.Please remember changing the status of employees remains subject to existing employment law and, depending on the employment contract, may be subject to negotiation. Step 2. Companies with furloughed workers should pay 80% of workers’ wages up to £2,500 a month, and they will retrospectively be able to claim for that amount. Employers can choose to pay the remaining 20% of the furloughed employees’ wages or top-up wages above the cap, but they will not be able to claim this back. The ICAEW has an workered illustration of how the scheme might work. Step 3. Currently, employers should use their normal payroll systems, deducting tax and national insurance under the pay as you earn (PAYE) system, although this may change. Step 4. If the company has limited cash flow to pay the wages, it will be expected to borrow the money until the scheme is fully up and running. Using in the first instance, the deferred VAT payments for the quarter until June 2020, which will not have to be paid until March 2021. Smaller firms need to remember to cancel any direct debits for VAT; otherwise, these will still be deducted automatically. Step 5. Firms who need to borrow further are being encouraged to look at the Government’s business interruption loans for smaller companies or the Bank of England’s commercial paper facility, which is suitable for the largest investment-grade companies. Step 6. Information should then be submitted to the HMRC about the employees that have been furloughed and their earnings. Through the planned online portal. This is expected to be up and running at the end of April/beginning of May. Compensation for the payments is expected at the end of May. Remember the scheme is a grant not a loan. Unfortunately, there is a great deal that is not clear yet about the system. For example, does the scheme include pension contributions and can employees who have already been made redundant be retrospectively included in the scheme? Most importantly, for our industry, exactly which employees will qualify? Does the programme include classic agency workers and what about those working with an umbrella company? This is a live document, and we will update you as soon as the answers to these question and any others become clear.What is clear is the Job Retention Scheme does not include self-employed workers. However, there is currently speculation that the Chancellor will introduce a similar scheme using earnings made in recent years as the measures of future payments. Zero hours workers appear to be included and you should assess their salary based on whatthey were paid in February.Please note this article is offered for guidance only. We have just produced our M&A Directory which includes a list of lawyers and financial advisors, and many of these can help through this difficult time. In addition, the UK scheme is just one of many around the world. For those firms with international employees, see the EMEA COVID-19 Legal Update, You may also want to have a look at our Coronavirus (COVID-19) Resource Center on our free resources page.If you have questions or comments about this briefing please use the comments box, we would love to hear from you. […]

  • EMEA COVID-19 Legal Update

    In this report, we provide links to information and guidance for employers and workforce solutions providers across Europe, Middle East & Africa. With the rapidly changing status of COVID-19 internationally, you should be aware that some of the advice and guidance in the links provided may have been superseded or updated: General Guidance and Information.  Europe Belgium France Germany Ireland Italy Luxembourg Netherlands Spain Turkey UK Middle East Africa Legal Disclaimer: This update is provided solely for the purposes of information and should not be considered legal advice. It is always recommended to seek the advice of qualified legal counsel before taking action.To download a pdf copy of this update, click below: EMEA_COVID19_Legal Update 20200325 - You do not have permission to view this object. General Guidance and Information Business ContinuityBusiness continuity can be defined as 'the processes, procedures, decisions and activities to ensure that an organization can continue to function through an operational interruption.’ContinuityCentral.com provides updates on business continuity, enterprise risk and resilienceSteps Companies Should Take to Protect Themselves from the Legal Fallout of the Coronavirus, Jones Day HealthWorld Health Organization (WHO) Europe Belgium Allen & Overy provides advice on many HR-related questions for employers in Belgium. France Employment All employers have a general obligation to take measures necessary to ensure the safety and protect the physical and mental health of their workers. Bird & Bird provide guidance for employers in France. Coronavirus and employer liability | the limits in France Osborne Clarke explains the measures that every employer needs to take to protect its employees and ensure business continuity. France’s Ministry of Labour also provides some information for employers and employees. France: A Guide to Prevent Collapse During Coronavirus Papaya Global provides information on what measures you can take as an employer in France to help preserve your employees while keeping your business intact. Data Protection CNIL, the French Data Protection Authority provides guidance on managing data in the current circumstances. Germany Employers are confronting difficult questions regarding how to handle safety and health rules, travel restrictions, compensation, immigration, and other employment issues. Littler’s Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) are designed to address some of the more common questions that employers with operations in Germany currently face. Germany: A Guide to Prevent Collapse During Coronavirus Papaya Global provides information on what measures you can take as an employer in Germany to help preserve your employees while keeping your business intact. Ireland Littler provides answers to some of the more common questions that employers with operations in Ireland currently face: Employer FAQs Italy Employers are confronting difficult questions regarding how to handle mandatory lockdowns, safety and health rules, travel restrictions, compensation, and other employment issues. Littler’s Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) are designed to address some of the more common questions that employers with operations in Italy currently face. Italy: A Guide to Prevent Collapse During Coronavirus Papaya Global provides information on what measures you can take as an employer in Italy to help preserve your employees while keeping your business intact. Luxembourg Update on information for employers Castegnaro provides information for employers with regard to the Government’s recommendations in the context of COVID-19. Recommendations by the CNPD on the processing of personal data in the context of a health crisis Castegnaro explains the recommendations of Luxembourg’s data protection commissioner regarding the collection of personal data in the context of the Coronavirus. Netherlands Emergency Fund Bridging Employment Replaces the Working Time Reduction Scheme An increasing number of employers in the Netherlands were applying to the Ministry of Social Affairs and Employment for permits to reduce their working hours (Werktijdverkorting, or WTV) arising from the coronavirus (COVID-19) and the resulting government measures. On 17 March 2020, the cabinet revoked the WTV program. The new temporary measure Emergency Fund Employment Bridging (“NOW”) replaces the WTV. In this article, Littler explains the changes. Coronavirus – information for companies in The Netherlands Osborne Clarke gives a brief overview of measures that employers may take as a result of this new situation. This includes both measures to prevent the further spread of the coronavirus and measures to reduce wage costs. Spain After the publication of Royal Decree-Law 8/2020 of 17 March, passing extraordinary urgent measures to face the economic and social impact of COVID-19, Clifford Chance has prepared a guide that includes the different measures to make performance of certain public sector, administrative or private contracts more flexible. Turkey The first case of coronavirus in Turkey was detected on 11 March 2020. The number of cases in Turkey had increased to 1236 in the following 13 days with 30 citizens losing their lives due to this virus. Turkey has taken several steps in order to mitigate the effects of the coronavirus in Turkey. Gün + Partners offer the following insights into the impact of the virus for businesses in Turkey: Coronavirus Support Package Announced on 18 March 2020 and Its Effects on Sectoral Basis Processing of Personal Data in COVID-19 Outbreak What Does Labour Law Say About COVID-19? Impact of Coronavirus on Contracts and Force Majeure UK Managing risk and compliance Gowling WLG has issued a guide which provides advice on the key considerations and actions businesses should take to respond to and manage the risk of COVID-19. Mishcon has also prepared some practical guidance that is available here. This includes guidance on workforce health and safety, insurance, contracts and business continuity. They also set out answers to some of the most frequently asked questions, taking into account the latest Government advice. Gender pay gap reporting: Due to the Coronavirus outbreak, the Government Equalities Office (GEO) and the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) have taken the decision to suspend enforcement of the gender pay gap deadlines for this reporting year (2019/20). Changes in employee roles, furloughs and layoffs Employee Retention Scheme: On Friday 20 March 2020 the Chancellor Rishi Sunak announced an "unprecedented" package of measures to protect millions of people's jobs and incomes as part of the national effort in response to coronavirus (COVID-19). Gowling WLG have summarised the measures. Putting employees on "furlough" to protect jobs – Taylor Wessing outlines the key features set out by the Government, and, where possible without having the published details, flags implications for employers and employees. Will the job retention scheme be available for agency workers? It is not yet clear to what extent various types of contingent worker will qualify under this scheme, writes Osborne Clarke. Immigration problems affecting employees - the most common questions being asked by employers – Fox Williams considers how employers sponsoring foreign workers to work in the UK should manage those workers in the current circumstances. Sick pay and benefits The UK government announced it would bring forward legislation to allow small-and medium-sized businesses and employers to reclaim Statutory Sick Pay (SSP) paid for sickness absence due to COVID-19. Proposed protection for the self-employed: how will Statutory Self-Employment Pay work for contractors and agency workers alongside the Job Retention Scheme? The House of Commons Public Bill Committee has proposed an amendment to the Coronavirus Bill, entitled Statutory Self-Employment Pay (SSEP). Osborne Clarke looks at the proposals. Working from home guidance Employers and employees should be practical, flexible and sensitive to each other's situation when working from home because of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. ACAS provides guidance on health and safety, technology, childcare and setting expectations for your workforce. Travel bans and quarantineGiven the spread of contagion around the world from COVID-19, international travel will be considered a risk for some time to come. Many employers whose employees have to travel for work, may want to require all staff returning from overseas trips to self-isolate for some time to come.If you ask an employee to self-isolate simply because you want to reduce the risk to your other staff, then ordinarily you should continue to pay them in the usual way. Some organisations may have a contractual right to reduce employees’ hours in various ways and it may be possible to serve notice on employees to take holiday if certain conditions are met. However, you should always take legal advice on implementing such policies or making amendments to your contracts. Data protection issues Data protection and coronavirus: what you need to know The UK’s Information Commissioner answers the questions businesses have about managing personal data and specifically health data during the pandemic. Middle East For legal advice on anything related to COVID-19, visit the Coronavirus Insight Centre from Middle East lawyers BSA Law. Can Employers Terminate Employees Due to COVID-19? Where businesses are unable to operate and employees are not working as a result of the COVID-19 outbreak, BSA provides guidance for employers and businesses on the issues and the resulting measures adopted by the UAE government. Africa South Africa Department of Employment and Labour unveil guidelines to deal with Covid-19 at workplaces Legal Disclaimer: This update is provided solely for the purposes of information and should not be considered legal advice. It is always recommended to seek the advice of qualified legal counsel before taking action. &nbs […]

  • Workforce Solutions Webinar – Best Practices for Successful Contingent Workforce Business Continuity Planning

    Sponsored by Beeline Covid-19 has given organizations a need to test and even operationalize their business continuity plans as they provide rapid response and action in safeguarding their workforce. As the number of contingent workers within your organization continues to grow, it is important to consider this significant population within your strategies to ensure a successful and comprehensive continuity response. Moderator:Adrianne Nelson, Sr. Director, Global Membership Products, Staffing Industry Analysts Speakers:Chris Paden, Director of Contingent Workforce Strategies & Research (The Americas), CCWP, Staffing Industry AnalystsAutumn Labadie Vaupel, Chief Operating Officer, BeelineDownload presentation (PDF)Watch webinar video below. […]

  • Asia Pacific COVID-19 Legal Update

    In this report, we provide links to information and guidance for employers and workforce solutions providers across the Asia Pacific region. With the rapidly changing status of COVID-19 internationally, you should be aware that some of the advice and guidance in the links provided may have been superseded or updated:  General Guidance and Information Australia  China  Hong Kong  India  Japan  Malaysia New Zealand Singapore Legal Disclaimer: This update is provided solely for the purposes of information and should not be considered legal advice. It is always recommended to seek the advice of qualified legal counsel before taking action.To download a pdf copy of this update, click below: Asia Pacific_COVID19_Legal Update 20200330 - You do not have permission to view this object. General Guidance and InformationCoronavirus: What are an Employer’s Obligations in Various Asian Countries? Littler provides a chart giving a snapshot of the measures being taken in several Asian jurisdictions. Business ContinuityBusiness continuity can be defined as 'the processes, procedures, decisions and activities to ensure that an organization can continue to function through an operational interruption.’ContinuityCentral.com provides updates on business continuity, enterprise risk and resilienceSteps Companies Should Take to Protect Themselves from the Legal Fallout of the Coronavirus, Jones Day HealthWorld Health Organization (WHO) AustraliaEmployers are confronting difficult questions regarding how to handle safety and health rules, travel restrictions, leave and accommodation, immigration, and other employment issues.  Littler provides the answers to some Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) are designed to address some of the more common questions that employers with operations in Australia currently face.The two most common questions at this time according to King & Wood Mallesons are (1) can employees be stood down without pay because of COVID-19? and (2) what options are available to avoid redundancies (which inevitably also leads back to the first question). This article seeks to answer these questions.Australia’s Fair Work Ombudsman provides guidance to help employers and employees understand their rights and responsibilities at work during the coronavirus, outbreak with latest updates and government information. ChinaOn February 7, 2020 the PRC Ministry of Human Resources and Social Security released Twelve Opinions on Stabilizing Labor Relations and Supporting Enterprises’ Resumption of Work and Production. Harris Bracken’s China Law blog gives a short summary of the issues most relevant to foreign companies with employees in China and to expats in China.Employment law around the coronavirus outbreak in China In this article, Withers gives a high-level overview of some major employment issues to be considered by employers in China.Coronavirus: how are 'force majeure' events regulated under PRC laws? Whether your businesses are based in Mainland China or rely on raw materials from there, Withers highlights how the very different legal and regulatory regime in China may impact your business operations. Hong KongIn Hong Kong, COVID-19 has caused serious disruption to the economy and has had a considerable impact on the workforce. On 28 January 2020, the Hong Kong Government announced that its employees (except for staff of the departments providing emergency services and essential public services) were not required to return to their offices and were to work from home starting from 29 January 2020 in order to prevent the spread of COVID-19. The Government also called on institutions in the private sector to adopt similar measures to assist in minimising the threat of COVID-19 spreading in the wider community. Businesses in Hong Kong have adopted a range of measures, up to and including temporarily shutting down their operations.This article from Howse Williams sets out some of the key issues that employers should consider in dealing with the outbreak.Employment Spotlight: Redundancies in Hong Kong Employers may be making more redundancies than usual as Hong Kong finds itself facing a time of political and economic uncertainty. Whether you're an employer or employee, it pays to have a basic understanding of the law regarding redundancies.  Gall provides an overview of the law in Hong Kong. IndiaIndia announced on 26 March an economic stimulus package worth INR 1.7 trillion (approximately USD 22.6 billion) as part of measures to ease the economic impact of the coronavirus pandemic, as reported by SIA’s Daily News.While the government has ordered the temporary closure of educational institutions, gyms, and most other places, King Stubb & Kasiva reports on the measures several state governments have begun to prescribe for offices and other establishments. KSK also provides answers to some FAQs on employment issues around COVID-19. JapanLittler’s Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) are designed to address some of the more common questions that employers with operations in Japan currently face.Employers are also encouraged to consult relevant guidance and FAQs issued by the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare (English) and the Prime Minister’s Office of Japan (English).  MalaysiaMovement Control Order Due to COVID-19: Top 10 FAQS by Employers and Employees On 16 March 2020, the Prime Minister of Malaysia issued an announcement that the Government will implement a Movement Control Order (“MCO”) throughout Malaysia from 18 to 31 March 2020 (“the Controlled Period”) as a measure to curb the outbreak of COVID-19. Tay and Partners summarise the salient points of the Regulations which are relevant to employers and employees. New ZealandCOVID-19 employment update – Government support package and the impacts of Government directives on workplaces In this article, Buddle Findlay outlines the conditions attaching to the Government’s support package and discusses some of the impacts on workplaces of the Government’s recent and expected directives.Buddle Findlay also provides guidance for businesses in New Zealand on managing commercial contracts in the current crisis. SingaporeOn 7 February 2020, due to heightened risk, the Singapore government raised its outbreak alert to Disease Outbreak Response System Condition (“Doscorn”) orange. Employers need to be aware of their obligations and take necessary precautionary measures at the workplace to protect the safety and health of their employees. In this article, Bryan Cave Leighton Paisner discuss some frequently asked questions: COVID-19 (Coronavirus Disease 2019): Key Employment Law Issues.Employers and employees can refer to the FAQs on COVID-19 section on the MOM website, the Updates on COVID-19 (Coronavirus Disease 2019) section on the MOH website and Updates on the COVID-19 situation section on Gov.sg.Legal Disclaimer: This update is provided solely for the purposes of information and should not be considered legal advice. It is always recommended to seek the advice of qualified legal counsel before taking action. […]

  • Outplacement Landscape 2020

    SIA estimates the global outplacement market achieved revenue of USD 3.2 billion in 2019, an increase of 7% over the prior year. While there are a number of specialist providers, outplacement is more normally provided as part of a portfolio of services offered by staffing firms, executive search firms and HR consultants. The outplacement market comprises a small number of large global providers and a long tail of more than 140 small providers. Since the 1980’s, the outplacement market has seen a number of large acquisitions where staffing firms in particular have acquired outplacement expertise, and this has led to a much more consolidated market. Leading vendors include Mercer, LHH (Lee Hecht Harrison) and Right Management, which ManpowerGroup has recently bundled into its Talent Solutions brand alongside its MSP and RPO services. As more and more outplacement firms provide up-skilling and re-skilling solutions, outplacement will increasingly be seen as an important component of workforce planning and a useful tool to facilitate total talent solutions. Download the entire report here:  Outplacement Landscape Report - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • Directory of Suppliers to Staffing Firms 2020 - March Update

    The Directory provides a comprehensive range of solutions and services that staffing firms may require to operate their businesses more efficiently and  effectively. 25 different categories ranging from advisors & consultants to payroll funding and back office technologies. Over 1,170 vendors spanning over 60 countries globally. New to this update the addition of the Online Staffing Enabling Technologies (OSET) category.   To download the complete report, please select the following link:  Directory of Suppliers to Staffing Firms 2020 - March Update - You do not have permission to view this object. […]