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  • Contingent Workforce Optimization Roadmap

    Since its creation, Staffing Industry Analysts’ (SIA’s)  Contingent Workforce Optimization RoadmapTM has been utilized as a tool by both program managers and executives charged with the task of establishing a contingent workforce program (CW program) for the first time, and those seeking to drive continuous improvement within the program.  The Contingent Workforce Optimization RoadmapTM captures at a high level the most important components of a contingent labor strategy and arranges them in a single, comprehensible view. By displaying the individual activities, the roadmap provides a guideline to manage the execution of the most appropriate strategy, which can then be tailored to the unique challenges of the organization utilizing the tool. The specific method used to maximize value is, of course, unique to the priorities and challenges of each organization.This report summarizes the main characteristics of the Roadmap, and includes, (as separate Excel files), an example project timeline and stakeholder management matrix, as well as references to relevant and associated SIA research. As such, it serves as a comprehensive tool for CW program owners to prepare for implementation (transformation mode), or advance their program beyond the initial implementation phase (adaptation mode), and familiarize themselves with what it takes to elevate a CW program to the next level.  Contingent Workforce Optimization Roadmap and Activity Guides 20190930 - You do not have permission to view this object. CW Optimization Roadmap_Attachment A Example Stakeholder Management Matrix 20190930 - You do not have permission to view this object. CW Optimization Roadmap_ Attachment B Example Project Plan 20190930 - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • 2019 MSP Landscape and Differentiators. Part 1: Global MSP Landscape

    Executive SummaryIn the period January - December 2018, the Managed Service Provider (MSP) market represented $141 billion of spend under management, with slower growth, estimated at 8% compared to 12% in 2017. The US continues to dominate the global MSP market, with 50% market share, although growth remains higher outside the US, with the EMEA region showing the greatest increase at 19%. Spend on global contracts covering three or more geographical regions continues to grow, as organizations expand program coverage, with approximately 30% of reported spend associated with global contracts. Market growth can be attributed to organic growth within programs, service expansion and net new clients, with 68% of reported net new clients adopting MSP for the first time. Financial Services endures as the dominant consumer of MSP, with a 21% share of spend, followed by Pharma/Biotech which, at 16%, has overtaken Technology/Telecom as the second largest client group. IT remains the most widely sourced occupational skill within MSP programs, with a 29% share of spend, up 4% from 2017.The largest MSPs globally (each with more than $6 billion of spend under management and unchanged from the previous year) are Allegis Global Solutions, KellyOCG, Pontoon, Randstad Sourceright and TAPFIN. Together they represent over 50% of the spend reported by the 26 participants in this study.Although the vendor-neutral model for sourcing temporary workers and independent contractors remains the most prevalent when measured by spend, the number of individual clients adopting alternative models is more evenly balanced, with only 33% of programs adopting a vendor-neutral model and a similar percentage adopting a master-supplier model.Proving that 2017’s blip was not the start of a reversal of the trend of previous years, there is once again more growth in SOW than temp/contract spend, with SOW/outsourcing spend representing 22% of reported spend under management.Although 23% of spend is attributed to programs with a value of $1 billion or more, 52% of individual programs manage spend of $10 million or less demonstrating that contrary to popular belief, the MSP model is not only the preserve of the large enterprise.There is emerging evidence that despite a slow start, ‘Total Talent’ solutions are finally beginning to gain traction, with 15% of MSP spend associated with a blended MSP/RPO service, (a y/y increase of 10%) and more providers actively promoting total talent services. Additionally, 19% of programs now include the provision of strategic workforce planning services.MSP providers are reporting a growth in the provision (and client adoption) of more sophisticated services beyond the core supplier management and billing proposition; direct sourcing services are provided in 31% of programs (up 25% y/y) and 12% offer a white-labeled service utilizing the client brand (up 4% y/y). MSP Landscape 2019 - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • Ten Steps to Designing an SOW Management Strategy and Business Model

    SIA’s most recent regional buyer surveys show that 47% of programs in APAC, 44% of programs in the Americas and 41% of programs in EMEA respectively, have SOW spend incorporated within their contingent workforce (CW) programs. Furthermore, most organizations claim to be ‘seriously exploring’ the addition of SOW spend into their programs within the next two years, demonstrating that SOW management is now a well-established feature of today’s CW program management portfolio. What remains unclear, however, is the depth to which this category of spend is managed in terms of the actual engagement management activity undertaken.SOW spend management activity can range from total, end-to-end SOW project/services management through to simply tracking SOW project/services engagement spend.This report is a useful tool for any CW program manager considering incorporating SOW management into their program. It identifies and details ten best-practice steps to consider when designing an effective SOW management strategy and operating business model.The steps are explored in further detail in Module One of SIA’s CCWP Statement of Work (SOW) Management Certification class. For more information on CCWP classes and certification visit the certification page of SIA’s website. Ten Steps to Designing an SOW Management Strategy - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • Ten Steps to Designing an SOW Management Strategy and Business Model

    SIA’s most recent regional buyer surveys show that 47% of programs in APAC, 44% of programs in the Americas and 41% of programs in EMEA respectively, have SOW spend incorporated within their contingent workforce (CW) programs. Furthermore, most organizations claim to be ‘seriously exploring’ the addition of SOW spend into their programs within the next two years, demonstrating that SOW management is now a well-established feature of today’s CW program management portfolio. What remains unclear, however, is the depth to which this category of spend is managed in terms of the actual engagement management activity undertaken.SOW spend management activity can range from total, end-to-end SOW project/services management through to simply tracking SOW project/services engagement spend.This report is a useful tool for any CW program manager considering incorporating SOW management into their program. It identifies and details ten best-practice steps to consider when designing an effective SOW management strategy and operating business model.The steps are explored in further detail in Module One of SIA’s CCWP Statement of Work (SOW) Management Certification class. For more information on CCWP classes and certification visit the certification page of SIA’s website. Ten Steps to Designing an SOW Management Strategy and Business Model - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • Contingent Workforce Optimization Roadmap

    Since its creation, Staffing Industry Analysts’ (SIA’s) Contingent Workforce Optimization RoadmapTM has been utilized as a tool by both program managers and executives charged with the task of establishing a contingent workforce program (CW program) for the first time, and those seeking to drive continuous improvement within the program.  The Contingent Workforce Optimization RoadmapTM captures at a high level the most important components of a contingent labor strategy and arranges them in a single, comprehensible view. By displaying the individual activities, the roadmap provides a guideline to manage the execution of the most appropriate strategy, which can then be tailored to the unique challenges of the organization utilizing the tool. The specific method used to maximize value is, of course, unique to the priorities and challenges of each organization.This report summarizes the main characteristics of the Roadmap, and includes, (as separate Excel files), an example project timeline and stakeholder management matrix, as well as references to relevant and associated SIA research. As such, it serves as a comprehensive tool for contingent workforce (CW) program owners to prepare for implementation (transformation mode), or advance their program beyond the initial implementation phase (adaptation mode), and familiarize themselves with what it takes to elevate a CW program to the next level. Contingent Workforce Optimization Roadmap and Activity Guides 20190930 - You do not have permission to view this object. CW Optimization Roadmap_Attachment A Example Stakeholder Management Matrix 20190930 - You do not have permission to view this object. CW Optimization Roadmap_ Attachment B Example Project Plan 20190930 - You do not have permission to view this object.  &nbs […]

  • Contingent Workforce Optimization Roadmap

    Since its creation, Staffing Industry Analysts’ (SIA’s)  Contingent Workforce Optimization RoadmapTM has been utilized as a tool by both program managers and executives charged with the task of establishing a contingent workforce program (CW program) for the first time, and those seeking to drive continuous improvement within the program.  The Contingent Workforce Optimization RoadmapTM captures at a high level the most important components of a contingent labor strategy and arranges them in a single, comprehensible view. By displaying the individual activities, the roadmap provides a guideline to manage the execution of the most appropriate strategy, which can then be tailored to the unique challenges of the organization utilizing the tool. The specific method used to maximize value is, of course, unique to the priorities and challenges of each organization.This report summarizes the main characteristics of the Roadmap, and includes, (as separate Excel files), an example project timeline and stakeholder management matrix, as well as references to relevant and associated SIA research. As such, it serves as a comprehensive tool for CW program owners to prepare for implementation (transformation mode), or advance their program beyond the initial implementation phase (adaptation mode), and familiarize themselves with what it takes to elevate a CW program to the next level.  Contingent Workforce Optimization Roadmap and Activity Guides 20190930 - You do not have permission to view this object. CW Optimization Roadmap_Attachment A Example Stakeholder Management Matrix 20190930 - You do not have permission to view this object. CW Optimization Roadmap_ Attachment B Example Project Plan 20190930 - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • 2019 MSP Landscape and Differentiators. Part 1: Global MSP Landscape

    Executive SummaryIn the period January - December 2018, the Managed Service Provider (MSP) market represented $141 billion of spend under management, with slower growth, estimated at 8% compared to 12% in 2017. The US continues to dominate the global MSP market, with 50% market share, although growth remains higher outside the US, with the EMEA region showing the greatest increase at 19%. Spend on global contracts covering three or more geographical regions continues to grow, as organizations expand program coverage, with approximately 30% of reported spend associated with global contracts. Market growth can be attributed to organic growth within programs, service expansion and net new clients, with 68% of reported net new clients adopting MSP for the first time. Financial Services endures as the dominant consumer of MSP, with a 21% share of spend, followed by Pharma/Biotech which, at 16%, has overtaken Technology/Telecom as the second largest client group. IT remains the most widely sourced occupational skill within MSP programs, with a 29% share of spend, up 4% from 2017.The largest MSPs globally (each with more than $6 billion of spend under management and unchanged from the previous year) are Allegis Global Solutions, KellyOCG, Pontoon, Randstad Sourceright and TAPFIN. Together they represent over 50% of the spend reported by the 26 participants in this study.Although the vendor-neutral model for sourcing temporary workers and independent contractors remains the most prevalent when measured by spend, the number of individual clients adopting alternative models is more evenly balanced, with only 33% of programs adopting a vendor-neutral model and a similar percentage adopting a master-supplier model.Proving that 2017’s blip was not the start of a reversal of the trend of previous years, there is once again more growth in SOW than temp/contract spend, with SOW/outsourcing spend representing 22% of reported spend under management.Although 23% of spend is attributed to programs with a value of $1 billion or more, 52% of individual programs manage spend of $10 million or less demonstrating that contrary to popular belief, the MSP model is not only the preserve of the large enterprise.There is emerging evidence that despite a slow start, ‘Total Talent’ solutions are finally beginning to gain traction, with 15% of MSP spend associated with a blended MSP/RPO service, (a y/y increase of 10%) and more providers actively promoting total talent services. Additionally, 19% of programs now include the provision of strategic workforce planning services.MSP providers are reporting a growth in the provision (and client adoption) of more sophisticated services beyond the core supplier management and billing proposition; direct sourcing services are provided in 31% of programs (up 25% y/y) and 12% offer a white-labeled service utilizing the client brand (up 4% y/y). MSP Landscape 2019 - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • 2019 MSP Landscape and Differentiators. Part 1: Global MSP Landscape

    Executive SummaryIn the period January - December 2018, the Managed Service Provider (MSP) market represented $141 billion of spend under management, with slower growth, estimated at 8% compared to 12% in 2017. The US continues to dominate the global MSP market, with 50% market share, although growth remains higher outside the US, with the EMEA region showing the greatest increase at 19%. Spend on global contracts covering three or more geographical regions continues to grow, as organizations expand program coverage, with approximately 30% of reported spend associated with global contracts. Market growth can be attributed to organic growth within programs, service expansion and net new clients, with 68% of reported net new clients adopting MSP for the first time. Financial Services endures as the dominant consumer of MSP, with a 21% share of spend, followed by Pharma/Biotech which, at 16%, has overtaken Technology/Telecom as the second largest client group. IT remains the most widely sourced occupational skill within MSP programs, with a 29% share of spend, up 4% from 2017.The largest MSPs globally (each with more than $6 billion of spend under management and unchanged from the previous year) are Allegis Global Solutions, KellyOCG, Pontoon, Randstad Sourceright and TAPFIN. Together they represent over 50% of the spend reported by the 26 participants in this study.Although the vendor-neutral model for sourcing temporary workers and independent contractors remains the most prevalent when measured by spend, the number of individual clients adopting alternative models is more evenly balanced, with only 33% of programs adopting a vendor-neutral model and a similar percentage adopting a master-supplier model.Proving that 2017’s blip was not the start of a reversal of the trend of previous years, there is once again more growth in SOW than temp/contract spend, with SOW/outsourcing spend representing 22% of reported spend under management.Although 23% of spend is attributed to programs with a value of $1 billion or more, 52% of individual programs manage spend of $10 million or less demonstrating that contrary to popular belief, the MSP model is not only the preserve of the large enterprise.There is emerging evidence that despite a slow start, ‘Total Talent’ solutions are finally beginning to gain traction, with 15% of MSP spend associated with a blended MSP/RPO service, (a y/y increase of 10%) and more providers actively promoting total talent services. Additionally, 19% of programs now include the provision of strategic workforce planning services.MSP providers are reporting a growth in the provision (and client adoption) of more sophisticated services beyond the core supplier management and billing proposition; direct sourcing services are provided in 31% of programs (up 25% y/y) and 12% offer a white-labeled service utilizing the client brand (up 4% y/y). MSP Landscape 2019 - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • Contingent Workforce Optimization Roadmap

     Since its creation, Staffing Industry Analysts’ (SIA’s) Contingent Workforce Optimization RoadmapTM has been utilized as a tool by both program managers and executives charged with the task of establishing a contingent workforce program (CW program) for the first time, and those seeking to drive continuous improvement within the program.  The Contingent Workforce Optimization RoadmapTM captures at a high level the most important components of a contingent labor strategy and arranges them in a single, comprehensible view. By displaying the individual activities, the roadmap provides a guideline to manage the execution of the most appropriate strategy, which can then be tailored to the unique challenges of the organization utilizing the tool. The specific method used to maximize value is, of course, unique to the priorities and challenges of each organization.This report summarizes the main characteristics of the Roadmap, and includes, (as separate Excel files), an example project timeline and stakeholder management matrix, as well as references to relevant and associated SIA research. As such, it serves as a comprehensive tool for contingent workforce (CW) program owners to prepare for implementation (transformation mode), or advance their program beyond the initial implementation phase (adaptation mode), and familiarize themselves with what it takes to elevate a CW program to the next level. Contingent Workforce Optimization Roadmap and Activity Guides 20190930 - You do not have permission to view this object. CW Optimization Roadmap_Attachment A Example Stakeholder Management Matrix 20190930 - You do not have permission to view this object. CW Optimization Roadmap_ Attachment B Example Project Plan 20190930 - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • Contingent Workforce Optimization Roadmap

    Since its creation, Staffing Industry Analysts’ (SIA’s)  Contingent Workforce Optimization RoadmapTM has been utilized as a tool by both program managers and executives charged with the task of establishing a contingent workforce program (CW program) for the first time, and those seeking to drive continuous improvement within the program.  The Contingent Workforce Optimization RoadmapTM captures at a high level the most important components of a contingent labor strategy and arranges them in a single, comprehensible view. By displaying the individual activities, the roadmap provides a guideline to manage the execution of the most appropriate strategy, which can then be tailored to the unique challenges of the organization utilizing the tool. The specific method used to maximize value is, of course, unique to the priorities and challenges of each organization.This report summarizes the main characteristics of the Roadmap, and includes, (as separate Excel files), an example project timeline and stakeholder management matrix, as well as references to relevant and associated SIA research. As such, it serves as a comprehensive tool for CW program owners to prepare for implementation (transformation mode), or advance their program beyond the initial implementation phase (adaptation mode), and familiarize themselves with what it takes to elevate a CW program to the next level.  Contingent Workforce Optimization Roadmap and Activity Guides 20190930 - You do not have permission to view this object. CW Optimization Roadmap_Attachment A Example Stakeholder Management Matrix 20190930 - You do not have permission to view this object. CW Optimization Roadmap_ Attachment B Example Project Plan 20190930 - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • 2019 MSP Landscape and Differentiators. Part 1: Global MSP Landscape

    Executive SummaryIn the period January - December 2018, the Managed Service Provider (MSP) market represented $141 billion of spend under management, with slower growth, estimated at 8% compared to 12% in 2017. The US continues to dominate the global MSP market, with 50% market share, although growth remains higher outside the US, with the EMEA region showing the greatest increase at 19%. Spend on global contracts covering three or more geographical regions continues to grow, as organizations expand program coverage, with approximately 30% of reported spend associated with global contracts. Market growth can be attributed to organic growth within programs, service expansion and net new clients, with 68% of reported net new clients adopting MSP for the first time. Financial Services endures as the dominant consumer of MSP, with a 21% share of spend, followed by Pharma/Biotech which, at 16%, has overtaken Technology/Telecom as the second largest client group. IT remains the most widely sourced occupational skill within MSP programs, with a 29% share of spend, up 4% from 2017.The largest MSPs globally (each with more than $6 billion of spend under management and unchanged from the previous year) are Allegis Global Solutions, KellyOCG, Pontoon, Randstad Sourceright and TAPFIN. Together they represent over 50% of the spend reported by the 26 participants in this study.Although the vendor-neutral model for sourcing temporary workers and independent contractors remains the most prevalent when measured by spend, the number of individual clients adopting alternative models is more evenly balanced, with only 33% of programs adopting a vendor-neutral model and a similar percentage adopting a master-supplier model.Proving that 2017’s blip was not the start of a reversal of the trend of previous years, there is once again more growth in SOW than temp/contract spend, with SOW/outsourcing spend representing 22% of reported spend under management.Although 23% of spend is attributed to programs with a value of $1 billion or more, 52% of individual programs manage spend of $10 million or less demonstrating that contrary to popular belief, the MSP model is not only the preserve of the large enterprise.There is emerging evidence that despite a slow start, ‘Total Talent’ solutions are finally beginning to gain traction, with 15% of MSP spend associated with a blended MSP/RPO service, (a y/y increase of 10%) and more providers actively promoting total talent services. Additionally, 19% of programs now include the provision of strategic workforce planning services.MSP providers are reporting a growth in the provision (and client adoption) of more sophisticated services beyond the core supplier management and billing proposition; direct sourcing services are provided in 31% of programs (up 25% y/y) and 12% offer a white-labeled service utilizing the client brand (up 4% y/y). MSP Landscape 2019 - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • 2019 MSP Landscape and Differentiators. Part 1: Global MSP Landscape

    Executive SummaryIn the period January - December 2018, the Managed Service Provider (MSP) market represented $141 billion of spend under management, with slower growth, estimated at 8% compared to 12% in 2017. The US continues to dominate the global MSP market, with 50% market share, although growth remains higher outside the US, with the EMEA region showing the greatest increase at 19%. Spend on global contracts covering three or more geographical regions continues to grow, as organizations expand program coverage, with approximately 30% of reported spend associated with global contracts. Market growth can be attributed to organic growth within programs, service expansion and net new clients, with 68% of reported net new clients adopting MSP for the first time. Financial Services endures as the dominant consumer of MSP, with a 21% share of spend, followed by Pharma/Biotech which, at 16%, has overtaken Technology/Telecom as the second largest client group. IT remains the most widely sourced occupational skill within MSP programs, with a 29% share of spend, up 4% from 2017.The largest MSPs globally (each with more than $6 billion of spend under management and unchanged from the previous year) are Allegis Global Solutions, KellyOCG, Pontoon, Randstad Sourceright and TAPFIN. Together they represent over 50% of the spend reported by the 26 participants in this study.Although the vendor-neutral model for sourcing temporary workers and independent contractors remains the most prevalent when measured by spend, the number of individual clients adopting alternative models is more evenly balanced, with only 33% of programs adopting a vendor-neutral model and a similar percentage adopting a master-supplier model.Proving that 2017’s blip was not the start of a reversal of the trend of previous years, there is once again more growth in SOW than temp/contract spend, with SOW/outsourcing spend representing 22% of reported spend under management.Although 23% of spend is attributed to programs with a value of $1 billion or more, 52% of individual programs manage spend of $10 million or less demonstrating that contrary to popular belief, the MSP model is not only the preserve of the large enterprise.There is emerging evidence that despite a slow start, ‘Total Talent’ solutions are finally beginning to gain traction, with 15% of MSP spend associated with a blended MSP/RPO service, (a y/y increase of 10%) and more providers actively promoting total talent services. Additionally, 19% of programs now include the provision of strategic workforce planning services.MSP providers are reporting a growth in the provision (and client adoption) of more sophisticated services beyond the core supplier management and billing proposition; direct sourcing services are provided in 31% of programs (up 25% y/y) and 12% offer a white-labeled service utilizing the client brand (up 4% y/y). MSP Landscape 2019 - You do not have permission to view this object. […]