Global Daily News

  • Temp jobs fall by 49,500 in March with US total jobs plummeting by 701,000

    The number of temporary jobs in the US fell by 49,500 to 2.89 million in March while total employment fell by 701,000, according to seasonally adjusted numbers released today by the US Bureau of Labor Statistics. However, the numbers reflect only the beginning stages of the Covid-19 crisis as the surveys on which the data is based closed in the middle of March as the fight against the virus ramped up.“Given the timing of the survey reference periods in this month’s jobs report, the magnitude of job losses for ‘March’ only reflects the beginning of the pandemic,” said Tony Gregoire, director of custom research at SIA.In March, the temp penetration rate fell to 1.91% from 1.93% in February. Temp jobs were down nearly 2.0% on a year-over-year basis.The US unemployment rate rose to 4.4% in March from 3.5% in February. The college-level unemployment rate jumped to 2.5%. in March from 1.9% in February.Jobs in the “leisure and hospitality” industry fell by 459,000 in March with most of the declines, 417,000, in “food services and drinking places,” according to the BLS. The decline nearly offset gains over the previous two years.Healthcare employment fell by 43,000, including job losses at dentist offices by 17,000; offices of physicians by 12,000; and offices of other healthcare practitioners by 7,000.But more job losses will come as the full extent of the Covid-19 crisis appears in later data releases.“Overall, while we are seeing a slowdown in March, the real impact will not hit until April or May, as corporate America reprioritizes its key initiatives,” said Harley Lippman, CEO of IT staffing firm Genesis10. “IT staffing is slow but consistent; employment decisions have been delayed with some operating under a hiring freeze until they can get their arms around the impact of Covid-19 on their business ecosystem.”The Conference Board said the loss of 701,000 jobs, one of the biggest in history, is only a taste of what is to come.“Unfortunately, this drop reflects just a fraction of the deterioration in labor market conditions during that month,” according to The Conference Board. “March’s jobs report mostly omits developments that took place in the second half of the month. The 10 million people who filed for unemployment benefits in the last two weeks of March were mostly not included in the March unemployment count.”March’s 4.4% unemployment rate is only a step toward the 15% unemployment rate that has been projected in May, The Conference Board said. However, it noted some facts about today’s BLS report, including that 60% of the entire job loss came from one industry segment: “Food services and drinking places.”It also noted average hourly earnings posted a significant jump, but for the wrong reasons. Large layoffs of mostly low-paid workers raised the average pay.Separately, there are some reports of companies holding off on layoffs for now.“The Covid-19 pandemic has taken a serious toll on the American workforce, and many industries have been forced to lay off or furlough employees during this crisis,” said Dan Davenport, president and general manager of Randstad RiseSmart. “But we’re also seeing organizations who are focused on taking care of their employees as much as possible, with some pledging to postpone layoffs for 60 or 90 days.&rdquo […]

  • TrueBlue’s PeopleReady lists most in-demand temp jobs amid Covid-19 pandemic

    TrueBlue Inc.’s (NYSE: TBI) PeopleReady division released a list of the most in-demand temporary job categories on its JobStack online platform amid the Covid-19 pandemic.“As communities mobilize to stop the spread of Covid-19, they need extra hands on deck to support overburdened healthcare systems, manufacturing and distribution of food and other critical supplies, emergency construction, waste management and more,” said Taryn Owen, president of PeopleReady.Here are the top categories of most in-demand temporary jobs; each had thousands of positions: Retail workers (e.g., stockers and truck unloaders for grocery stores and pharmacies) Manufacturing workers (e.g., assemblers and fabricators, material handlers) Construction laborers (e.g., foremen, helpers, flaggers) Warehouse workers (e.g., forklift operators, pick/pack workers, shipping/receiving workers) Sanitation workers (e.g., janitors, industrial cleaners) Waste management workers (e.g., refuse collectors, recycling and reclamation workers) Skilled trades workers (e.g., carpenters, electricians, HVAC, solar installers, welders) General laborers (e.g., wide range of roles across industries) There were more than 50,000 jobs posted on JobStack last week. […]

  • Resources Connection revenue falls 6.2% in fiscal Q3; Covid-19 impacts Asia-Pacific operations

    Resources Connection Inc. (NASDAQ: RGP) reported revenue fell 6.2% on a constant currency basis in its fiscal third quarter ended Feb. 22. It reported operations in Asia Pacific were affected by the Covid-19 crisis during the quarter. The Irvine, California-headquartered company provides professional staffing and operates as Resources Global Professionals.“Covid-19 impacted RGP in Q3 in our Asia Pac region,” CEO Kate Duchene said. “That, plus the tough holiday dynamics, created a challenging backdrop these past three months.”Duchene said it isn’t possible to predict Covid-19’s impact on business; however, the company is expecting an adverse impact. (US$ thousands) Q3 2020 Q3 2019 % change % constant currency Revenue $168,052 $179,498 -6.4% -6.2% Gross margin $61,420 $67,911 -9.6%   Gross margin percentage 36.5% 37.8%     Net income $6,942 $5,796 19.8%   Third-quarter revenue included $5.4 million from RGP’s acquisition of Veracity in Europe. Revenue fell 8.1% excluding Veracity and the exit of activities in Europe. RGP also noted the third quarter of 2020 included more holidays in the US and an extended Lunar New Year holiday as well as the adverse impact of Covid-19 in Asia Pacific. Revenue by geography (US$ thousands) Q3 2020 Q3 2019 % change % constant currency North America $138,819 $146,817 -5.4% -5.5% Asia Pacific $11,202 $11,770 -4.8% -4.6% Europe $18,031 $20,911 -13.8% -12.4% RGP also reported it eliminated 73 positions in North America and Asia Pacific as part of a restructuring, and it is now reviewing its Asia Pacific operations. It expects to take a restructuring charges of between $4 million and $5 million, of which approximately $3 million will be taken in its fiscal fourth quarter. RGP expects pre-tax savings of between $13 million and $15 million in personnel costs in fiscal 2021.The company also plans to focus on a physical presence in certain markets and virtual presence in others. It expects to terminate or sublet 26% of its existing real estate leases by the end of the 2020 calendar year. It expects $1 million in lease termination and other costs in its fiscal fourth quarter and further costs in fiscal 2021. However, it expects annual pre-tax savings of between $3 million and $4 million. Share price and market capShares in Resources Connection were down 3.3% to $9.86 as of 11:47 a.m. Eastern time today; the company had a market cap of $327.8 million, according to FT.com. […]

  • People: NALTO, Floyd Lee Locums, Coupa Software, ZRG

    The National Association of Locum Tenens Organizations introduced Matt Erickson of LocumTenens.com, its newly elected president, at its annual meeting last month in Tampa, Florida. Erickson is serving a two-year term as president. In addition, NALTO announced five executives from across the locum tenens industry that will serve on the NALTO board for either two- or three-year terms: Milan Boulette of Cross Country Locums, Liz Hale of MPLT Healthcare, Michelle Lathan of Floyd Lee Locums, Shannon Penney of Delta Locum Tenens and Michael Sievert of CompHealth. Three of those executives will also serve as committee chairs: Hale is the chair of the credentialing committee, Sievert is chair of the conference committee and Lathan is chair of the education committee. In addition, NALTO announced John Daniel will serve as chair of the arbitration committee.Floyd Lee Locums named Nicole Burleson as chief operating officer. Burleson has nearly 20 years of experience in healthcare staffing and she spent 18 years at Supplemental Health Care, most recently as senior regional VP.Coupa Software named Michael van Keulen as chief procurement officer. Van Keulen most recently managed global procurement for athletic apparel and technical clothing retailer lululemon. Coupa Software’s operations include VMS provider DCR Workforce.Executive search firm ZRG appointed Brian Meany as managing partner and global head of its retail practice. Meany will work in the firm’s New York office. Meany spent the past 25 years as managing director for executive search firm Herbert Mines. […]

  • Federal judge: Lyft disregarding law under AB 5 by not reclassifying drivers as employees (Bloomberg)

    A federal judge issued notice to Lyft Inc. (NASDAQ: LYFT) that not treating its California drivers like employees is “really disregarding the rule of law,” Bloomberg reported. The judge made the remarks during a court hearing on a demand by drivers for sick pay amid the coronavirus pandemic. The judge said not classifying the drivers as employees goes against California law AB 5. […]

  • World – Resources Connection Q3 revenue falls in constant currency as APAC hit by coronavirus

    International professional staffing provider Resources Connection Inc. (NASDAQ: RECN) reported revenue of $168.1 million for its fiscal third quarter, down 6.2% from prior year quarter on a constant currency basis.The group said its results were impacted by extra holidays and Covid-19 in Asia Pacific. (USD thousands) Q3 2020 Q3 2019 % change % change constant currency Revenue 168,052 179,498 -6.4% -6.2% Gross margin 61,420 67,911 -9.5% - Gross margin percentage 36.5% 37.8% - - Net income 6,942 5,796 19.7% - The group said its year-over-year and sequential decreases in gross margin are related primarily to an increase in holiday pay for consultants in the US. (USD thousands) Q3 2020 Q3 2019 % change North America 138,819 146,817 -5.4% Asia Pacific 11,202 11,770 -4.8% Europe 18,031 20,911 -13.7% Total Revenue 168,052 179,498 -6.4% In Europe, the Group’s exit from the Nordics and Belgian markets resulted in a $2.4 million decrease in revenue compared to fiscal Q3 2019. Excluding this impact, Europe's third quarter revenue showed a decline of 2.6% compared to a year ago or a decline of 1.2% on a constant currency basis. The bright spot in the third quarter was the UK showing strong performance compared to prior year quarter.The group stated that the events relating to Covid-19 had an adverse impact on its revenue in Asia Pacific during the quarter. It added that ”there is significant uncertainty as to the likely effects of this pandemic which may, among other things, reduce demand for or delay client decisions to procure our services.”The group said it was in its latest phase of restructuring and reviewing its global business, particularly in North America and Asia Pacific. The group carried out a reduction in its workforce in early March, whereby it eliminated 73 positions in North America and Asia Pacific. It added that a review of the European business is still underway.Resources Connection said it expects to take a restructuring charge of $4 million to $5 million, of which approximately $3 million will be taken in the fourth quarter of 2020. Upon completion of the reduction in its workforce, the company expects annual pre-tax savings of $13 million to $15 million with respect to personnel costs. Kate Duchene, Chief Executive Officer, said, “We are operating now in a new normal. Our utmost concern is for our people – our employees and our clients. We have pivoted rapidly to a virtual operating model and are doing everything we can to stay productive, while continuing to serve all of our people with empathy, speed and creativity.”“Covid-19 impacted RGP in Q3 in our Asia Pac region,” Duchene said. “That, plus the tough holiday dynamics created a challenging backdrop these past three months. I am proud we were able to deliver revenue results close to the high-end of our expectations in the third quarter despite these conditions – and we saw continued strengthening in both closed revenue and pipeline in January and February.”“In the past few weeks, Covid-19 has become a truly global pandemic and we are relieved to have taken significant action in early March to improve our operating model and cost structure. While we cannot predict with certainty how the pandemic will impact our business in the coming months, I believe our timely initiative to reduce cost and streamline operations will serve us well,” Duchene said.The group also reported rthat revenue for its first nine months of fiscal 2020 decreased by 3.7% on a constant currency basis.In trading yesterday Resources Connection shares closed at $10.20, down 1.16% on the day and 17.78% above the 52 week low of $8.66 set on 18 March 2020. Based on its current share price the company has a market value of $327.83 million. […]

  • World – Robert Walters withdraws dividend as it reduces costs amid Covid-19 crisis

    UK-based global recruiter Robert Walters Plc (RWA: LSE) provided an update yesterday in light of the evolving Covid-19 pandemic.The Board believes that the business is well placed to cope with future uncertainties. While the impact of Covid-19 continues to evolve, the group said it has taken a number of pre-emptive actions to manage costs and help mitigate the financial challenges imposed by the virus. Since the escalation of the crisis in February, the group has reduced its cost base by more than 15% and is also in the process of applying for a number of government subsidies around the globe.The Board also announced that it has taken the decision to withdraw its intention to propose a final dividend for FY 2019. It added that ‘this is a prudent move’, given the current unprecedented period of global lockdown and uncertainty, which will serve to further strengthen the group's balance sheet and improve liquidity. The Board added that it will reassess the dividend once the economic impact of Covid-19 has become clearer.Robert Walters added that it had a net cash balance of £74 million.The company will update the market on its Q1 performance as planned on 8 April 2020.“While it is too early to accurately quantify the impact of the crisis on forecast performance, this update will provide a fuller assessment of FY20 trading to date,” the company stated.In light of UK government guidance on non-essential gatherings, the Board is currently reviewing the AGM date pending an update to this official guidance.In trading yesterday Robert Walters shares closed at £335.00, up 8.06% on the day. Based on its current share price the company has a market value of £246.42 million. […]

  • Germany – Orizon appoints CEO

    Orizon, the 9th largest German staffing firm, announced that it appointed Oliver Kömpf as its new CEO.Kömpf succeeds previous CEO Dieter Traub, who built the company and successfully managed it for over 14 years. Prior to joining Orizon, Kömpf was managing director, EMEA, of Hays Talent Solutions. He previously worked for Alexander Mann Solutions and Parity.Kömpf has over 20 years of management experience in the personnel services industry in the context of temporary employment, with the placement of highly qualified freelancers and permanent employees and especially in the outsourcing of recruitment and procurement processes. "Orizon is already one of the most successful personnel service providers in Germany," Kömpf said. “With new ideas and agile methods, we will be able to further expand Orizon's strengths and thereby grow. Orizon is clearly positioned in the market, the team is well positioned and motivated. It is about aligning our services to customer needs, offering employees perspectives, developing their potential and in this way successfully changing the market.”Orizon offers a comprehensive range of personnel services. The service portfolio includes personnel hiring and placement as well as the implementation of complex personnel projects. Orizon has been part of the Japanese group Outsourcing Inc., since 2017. […]

  • Europe – European Commission proposes €100 billion lending facility to help maintain jobs and businesses

    The European Commission is proposing to set up a €100 billion solidarity instrument to help workers keep their incomes and businesses stay afloat.The €100 billion initiative, called SURE, aims to cushion the economic blow in order for the EU economy to be ready to restart when the conditions are right.The Commission is also proposing to redirect all available structural funds to the response to the coronavirus.President of the European Commission Ursula von der Leyen said, “In this coronavirus crisis, only the strongest of responses will do. We must use every means at our disposal. Every available euro in the EU budget will be redirected to address it, every rule will be eased to enable the funding to flow rapidly and effectively. With a new solidarity instrument, we will mobilise €100 billion to keep people in jobs and businesses running. With this, we are joining forces with member states to save lives and protect livelihoods. This is European solidarity.”SURE will provide up to €100 billion in loans to countries that need it to ensure that workers receive an income and businesses keep their staff. This allows people to continue to pay their rent, bills and food shopping and helps provide much needed stability to the economy.The loans will be based on guarantees provided by member states and will be directed to where they are most urgently needed. All member states will be able to make use of this but it will be of particular importance to the hardest-hit.SURE will support short-time work schemes and similar measures to help ember states protect jobs, employees and self-employed against the risk of dismissal and loss of income. Firms will be able to temporarily reduce the hours of employees or suspend work altogether, with income support provided by the State for the hours not worked. The self-employed will receive income replacement for the current emergency. Farmers and fisherman will also be supported. […]

  • UK – REC says changes to coronavirus loans programme are helpful

    Chancellor Rishi Sunak has extended the government's Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan to small and medium businesses who have been hit by the crisis. The Recruitment and Employment Confederation has called the changes helpful.The programme was first announced in March and focused on large firms, increasing the amount businesses can borrow from £1.2 million to £5 million, and ensuring businesses can access the first six months of that finance interest free, as government will cover the first six  months of interest paymentsNeil Carberry, CEO of the Recruitment and Employment Confederation said, “These changes are helpful, and expand the scope of help the CBIL process offers. There is more to do to ensure that bank requests for guarantees from businesses are appropriate, where owners have already injected their cash into the business. Raising the £250,000 bar for lending without guarantees would help, or only asking for guarantees for the 20% of the loan value the government promise does not cover.”“But businesses in high cash-flow, thin-margin sectors ¬– like recruitment and staffing – need quicker support than CBILs is likely to be able to offer if they are to navigate this challenging time and look after their people,” Carberry said. “This is especially true for temporary agency work providers who pay their workers on a weekly basis, and cannot afford to furlough them unless there is far greater speed and clarity about when government support will be available – and access to those funds quickly.”Sunak’s said that changes to the CBIL programme mean that: Applications will not be limited to businesses that have been refused a loan on commercial terms, extending the number who benefit. However, the Treasury has not capped the interest rates banks can charge. Banks will be banned from asking company owners to guarantee loans with their own savings or property when borrowing up to £250,000 Larger firms with a turnover of up to £500 million will also be eligible for more help - with state-backed loans of up to £25 million available to firms with revenues of between £45 million-£500 million. […]

  • Japan – S-Pool first quarter revenue and profits soar

    Japanese staffing firm S-Pool (2471: JP) reported revenue yesterday for the first quarter ended 29 February 2020 of JPY 4.67 billion (USD 43.0 million), an increase of 20.3% compared with the same period last year.  (JPY millions) Q1 2020 Q1 2019 Change Q1 2020 (USD millions) Revenue 4,675 3,888 20.3% 43.0 Gross Profit 1,311 994 31.9% 12.0 Gross Margin 28.1% 25.6% - - Operating Profit 386 211 82.8% 3.5 Net Income 302 125 139.9% 2.7  Founded in 1999, S-Pool is headquartered in Tokyo and provides outsourcing services as well as temporary staffing services in the sales and marketing and office support/secretarial support sectors.The group reported an increase in profit for its mainstay staffing services and employment support services for persons with disabilities as well as an increase in sales of employment support services. The group also reported an increase in equipment sales revenue and management revenue of farms.S-Pool said the coronavirus crisis had a limited impact on its performance ‘at this time’.Looking ahead the group reported full year revenue of JPY 20.63 billion (USD 190.1 million) for the year ended November 2020.In trading today S-Pool shares closed at JPY 491.00 (USD 4.52), down 3.54% on the day and 18.60% above the 52 week low of JPY 414.00 (USD 3.81) set on 23 March 2020. Based on its current share price the company has a market value of JPY 40.21 billion (USD 370.4 million). […]

  • New Zealand – Consult Recruitment acquires IT recruitment firm Halo Consulting

    New Zealand-based recruitment firm Consult Recruitment announced that it has successfully acquired Halo Consulting, an IT recruitment agency based in New Zealand.The effective date of the acquisition was 31 March 2020. Financial details were not disclosed.Halo Consulting specialises in technology and digital recruitment. By joining Consult, the combined company is now able to service their clients across IT & digital, accounting & finance, sales, marketing, business support, legal, HR and risk roles.“This transaction puts the combined organisation as the most significant player in the New Zealand professional recruitment market,” Consult stated.The Halo team will continue to be led by directors and principal consultants Alastair Shorten and Richard Lloyd; and will be joining the wider Consult team once lockdown is over. Consult is led by CEO Angela Cameron.Cameron stated, “We are beyond excited to have successfully welcomed Halo Consulting to the Consult family. Over the years, we've had so many clients ask us to help them access talent in the IT and digital space - so it is wonderful to now have the Halo team to provide their expertise. Despite the challenging circumstances in the New Zealand (and global) economy right now, this move ensures Consult has strength and a capability unsurpassed in the New Zealand recruitment environment.”Consult’s Chair, and industry advisor Greg Savage said, "Despite the current economic circumstances, long-term growth strategies, including acquisitions, continue to be part of the Consult vision. Halo Consulting represents an excellent acquisition as they are a strong business, with an excellent reputation and an experienced team who are culturally aligned with the Consult business. Consult is well positioned to thrive despite the current economic challenges".Halo co-founders and principals Alastair Shorten and Richard Lloyd stated "We are rapt to have become part of the Consult business and to benefit from the support and opportunities that will be generated together. Our team is excited, our clients are happy that we can provide additional recruitment in specialist areas and we feel ambitious about the road ahead. In this current environment - technology has never been more important and our clients are indicating that the road ahead in technology recruitment will continue to be active.&rdquo […]

  • Australia – Pre-pandemic job vacancies slip in February

    The number of job vacancies in Australia decreased by 2.2% on a seasonally adjusted basis over the year to February 2020, according to data from the Australian Bureau of Statistics.Over the February quarter job vacancies fell by 0.1%. Bruce Hockman, Chief Economist at the Bureau, said "The quarterly decline in the seasonally adjusted data includes reduced vacancies for some of the businesses affected by the bushfires. The period since the February survey has been a difficult time for the Australian community,”The Bureau added that there was no notable impact of the Covid-19 virus on job vacancies for February 2020. The reference period for job vacancies fell at a point where there was only a relatively low number of confirmed Covid-19 cases within Australia and before it was declared a global pandemic. […]

Latest Research

  • Best Practices in Remote Working For Staffing Firms

    Key Findings: Why your firm will benefit from remote-enabled workers. There are many benefits to offering staff the flexibility to work remotely: improved employee satisfaction and retention, the ability to recruit homebound workers (parents of young children, the physically handicapped), the ability to recruit workers outside your local area, reduced employee illness, reduced rent, and potentially quieter work settings. Five recommendations for managing remote workers: Set expectations and get buy-in. Know what success looks like, get agreement on those terms, and monitor performance using metrics. Suggested metrics for fifteen internal staff occupations are included in this report. Encourage communication. Encourage virtual meetings, be available yourself, and invest in appropriate technology. Take appropriate action on legal issues. Remote work is perfectly legal, but does require some compliance on the part of employers, particularly with respect to non-exempt employees, data protection, workers’ compensation, and discrimination. Make sure staff have the right equipment. In addition to the obvious -- a computer, phone, etc. -- remote workers will benefit from video conferencing software, a VPN, file-share capability and a few other things. What to advise remote staff. Above all, it’s important that they establish a work schedule and a workspace and stay connected with coworkers. Be selective in who works remotely. Remote work requires a certain level of self-discipline and organization. It won’t work for everyone. Additional information is available in this report on trends in remote work at staffing firms. Usage is increasing and internal staff appreciate the flexibility. To access the complete report, please select the link below: Best Practices in Remote Work For Staffing Firms 20200403 - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • US Jobs Report: April 2020

    Event- On a seasonally adjusted basis, total nonfarm employment declined by 701,000 in March, according to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) in its monthly jobs report. Temporary help services lost 49,500 jobs for the month. These job losses are the worst since March 2009 and April 2009, respectively, but only partly account for the recent pandemic. According to BLS, workers who are paid by their employer for any part of the pay period including the 12th of the month are counted as employed in the establishment survey (the survey which BLS conducts to gather all information in this report except the unemployment rate). Across respondents to the establishment survey, 33% have a weekly pay period, about 40% a bi-weekly, about 20% semi-monthly, and a small amount monthly.Background and Analysis- On a year-over-year (y/y) basis (March 2020 over March 2019), total nonfarm employment was up 1.0%, and monthly job gains have averaged approximately 125,000 over the past 12 months. Temporary help employment was down 2.0% y/y, reflective an average decline of 4,900 jobs per month over the past 12 months.As is typical in the beginning of an economic crisis, a greater share of temporary staffing jobs than total jobs were lost in March, driving the temporary agency penetration rate (the share of total nonfarm employment made up by the temporary help industry) down from 1.93% in February to 1.91% in March.Of the 15 major industry groups, 3 added jobs in March: government (+12,000), information (+2,000), and wholesale trade (+900). The three biggest decliners for the month were leisure & hospitality (-459,000), healthcare & social assistance (-61,200) and temporary help (-49,500). The relatively large declines in healthcare & social assistance may be surprising, (a majority of the declines in this group were from child day care and offices of dentists). There was little change in employment at hospitals in March, likely reflecting cancellation of non-critical appointments in anticipation of COVID-related demand not yet in full swing during the reference week.The national unemployment rate rose from 3.5% in February to 4.4% in March, but the large increase only partly accounts for the recent pandemic. In the household survey, which BLS uses to determine the unemployment rate, individuals are classified as unemployed based on their answers to a series of questions during the survey reference week (March 8th through March 14th).BLS Revisions - The change in total nonfarm payroll employment for February was revised from +273,000 to +275,000. January was revised from +273,000 to +214,000. With these revisions, total nonfarm employment gains were 57,000 lower than previously reported.The change in temporary help services employment for February was revised from -3,300 to -3,900. January was revised from -2,600 to -3,900. With these revisions, temporary help employment growth was lower than previously reported by 1,900 jobs.Staffing Industry Analysts’ Perspective- Given the timing of the survey reference periods in this month’s jobs report, the magnitude of job losses for “March” only reflects the beginning of the pandemic. Economists in a Bloomberg article released today predict a decline in total nonfarm employment “in the vicinity of 20 million” in April, and that “unemployment will soar toward 15% next month.” During this challenging time, the temporary penetration rate will likely decline as temporary agency employment does what it is designed to do in a situation like this (absorb losses overall while responding to certain instances of growing demand). As far as what happens after April, we will be looking for a flattening in confirmed cases of COVID-19, the new key leading economic indicator. Members may download our jobs report tool by selecting the link below: Monthly Employment Situation April 2020 - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • What saved your business in the last recession?

    Introduction The term “Generals always fight the last war” is used to refer to the situation where business managers focus on using strategies that previously succeeded rather than coming up with new approaches according to the situation. That having been said, it is always useful to know what others have done before you. In 2011, we asked the 483 survey respondents to our Staffing Company Survey the open-ended question, “What was the smartest thing you did in the last downturn? What saved your business? Looking back, what would you do differently?” About half of respondents cited cost-related strategies as their firm’s key to surviving the recession; thirteen percent of firms took a revenue-related approach; and remaining responses included ‘narrowing focus’, ‘emphasizing flexibility’, and ‘focusing on the employee’. A common theme among responses--independent of strategy--was the need to act quickly. Particularly among those citing a cost-saving strategy, many wished they had responded to the downturn sooner. In addition to this report, we are documenting the approaches companies are starting to take as described in their quarterly reports and any changes in the law. We have curated and organized a list of relevant links on COVID-19. In addition, the articles in the Staffing Stream on recession planning are well worth reading, including those by Greg Savage. To download the full report, please click below: What saved your busines 20200403 - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • A Look At the Workforce Environment in the United States of America

    Key Points: The U.S. remains the World’s largest market in terms of revenue generated by temporary agency work. The US ranks 55th in the world for ease of starting a business but is 6th in terms of ease of doing business according to the World Bank rankings for 2020. The U.S. is one of the most liberal staffing markets in the world but the complex interplay between federal, state and local laws creates administrative burden for employers. Rules governing the use and provision of labor and temporary labor are found throughout U.S. federal and state legal sources. This report covers the commercial requirements for setting up and running a staffing business in the U.S., the different models of supplying contingent worker solutions, contingent worker rights and legal risks related to employee screening, data protection, health and safety etc. Legal Disclaimer: This report is provided solely for the purposes of information and should not be considered legal advice. It is recommended to seek the advice of qualified legal counsel before taking action.To download a pdf copy of this report, click below:  A Look at the Workforce Environment in the United States of America 20200331 - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • What saved your business ?

    Introduction The term “Generals always fight the last war” is used to refer to the situation where business managers focus on using strategies that previously succeeded rather than coming up with new approaches according to the situation. That having been said, it is always useful to know what others have done before you. In 2011, we asked the 483 survey respondents to our Staffing Company Survey the open-ended question, “What was the smartest thing you did in the last downturn? What saved your business? Looking back, what would you do differently?” About half of respondents cited cost-related strategies as their firm’s key to surviving the recession; thirteen per cent of firms took a revenue-related approach; and remaining responses included ‘narrowing focus’, ‘emphasizing flexibility’, and ‘focusing on the employee’. A common theme among responses--independent of strategy--was the need to act quickly. Particularly among those citing a cost-saving strategy, many wished they had responded to the downturn sooner. In addition to this report, we are documenting the approaches companies are starting to take as described in their quarterly reports and outlining the job retention schemes that are available and any changes in the law. We have curated and organized a list of relevant links on COVID-19. In addition, the articles in the Staffing Stream on recession planning are well worth reading, including those by Greg Savage. Lastly, we are very happy to discuss what approaches we see the market taking, so please don’t hesitate to reach out to me and we will arrange a call. To download the full report, please click below: What saved your business 20200402 - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • EMEA Financial Results Q4 2019

    Introduction Only 30 of the 37 publicly traded staffing firms in the EMEA region have reported so far this year. Due to the varying nature of financial reporting styles across EMEA, some these have reported their revenue in only half years and other varying periods. Revenue in the 30 firms rose by a median of 0.5% during 2019, compared to the same period in 2018. Among the companies included in this report, fourteen reported a decrease in revenue. The median gross margin did not increase compared to last year while the median net income fell by -15.2%. The nine UK-based staffing companies reported year-on-year median revenue growth of 2.0%. For the six listed Swedish staffing firms, it was down by -10.6% when compared to the previous year. In the Netherlands, revenue at Randstad and DPA fell while it increased for Brunel. The picture in France was mixed with four of the five firms up on last year. For the full results see page 4 and 5. The vast majority of these results were unaffected by the impact of COVID19. However there have been a slew of announcements  since then showing the impact of the virus. Those available appear from page six onwards in translation and paraphrased where necessary. Measures implemented include the cancellation of dividends, redundancies, workers placed on the various furlough schemes available around Europe and the reduction of working hours and salary. We have stopped coverage of two firms that where in our last report. The Polish listed staffing firm Work Service was acquired by GI Group of Italy. While Harvey Nash was acquired by DBAY Advisors. To download the full report, please click below: EMEA Financal Results Q4 2019 - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • Workforce Solutions Webinar – Best Practices for Successful Contingent Workforce Business Continuity Planning

    Sponsored by Beeline Covid-19 has given organizations a need to test and even operationalize their business continuity plans as they provide rapid response and action in safeguarding their workforce. As the number of contingent workers within your organization continues to grow, it is important to consider this significant population within your strategies to ensure a successful and comprehensive continuity response. Moderator:Adrianne Nelson, Sr. Director, Global Membership Products, Staffing Industry Analysts Speakers:Chris Paden, Director of Contingent Workforce Strategies & Research (The Americas), CCWP, Staffing Industry AnalystsAutumn Labadie Vaupel, Chief Operating Officer, BeelineDownload presentation (PDF)Watch webinar video below. […]

  • Market Snapshot Italy

    Our Market Snapshots provide an executive summary of the international staffing markets in EMEA and APAC.  They can be used as a barometer to assess the relative business environment within each market and are designed to help you whether you are a buyer or supplier of contingent labour; looking to move into a new market place or need to understand the different national factors you will encounter in managing your workforce internationally. You can download the entire report here:  Market Snapshot Italy - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • What saved your business ?

    Introduction The term “Generals always fight the last war” is used to refer to the situation where business managers focus on using strategies that previously succeeded rather than coming up with new approaches according to the situation. That having been said, it is always useful to know what others have done before you. In 2011, we asked the 483 survey respondents to our Staffing Company Survey the open-ended question, “What was the smartest thing you did in the last downturn? What saved your business? Looking back, what would you do differently?” About half of respondents cited cost-related strategies as their firm’s key to surviving the recession; thirteen per cent of firms took a revenue-related approach; and remaining responses included ‘narrowing focus’, ‘emphasizing flexibility’, and ‘focusing on the employee’. A common theme among responses--independent of strategy--was the need to act quickly. Particularly among those citing a cost-saving strategy, many wished they had responded to the downturn sooner. •In addition to this report, we are documenting the approaches companies are starting to take as described in their quarterly reports and any changes in the law. We have curated and organized a list of relevant links on COVID-19. In addition, the articles in the Staffing Stream on recession planning are well worth reading, including those by Greg Savage. Lastly, we are very happy to discuss what approaches we see the market taking, so please don’t hesitate to reach out to me and we will arrange a call. To download the full report, please click below: What saved your business ROW 20200402 - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • Workforce Solutions Webinar – Best Practices for Successful Contingent Workforce Business Continuity Planning

    Sponsored by Beeline Covid-19 has given organizations a need to test and even operationalize their business continuity plans as they provide rapid response and action in safeguarding their workforce. As the number of contingent workers within your organization continues to grow, it is important to consider this significant population within your strategies to ensure a successful and comprehensive continuity response. Moderator:Adrianne Nelson, Sr. Director, Global Membership Products, Staffing Industry Analysts Speakers:Chris Paden, Director of Contingent Workforce Strategies & Research (The Americas), CCWP, Staffing Industry AnalystsAutumn Labadie Vaupel, Chief Operating Officer, BeelineDownload presentation (PDF)Watch webinar video below. […]

  • Asia Pacific COVID-19 Legal Update

    In this report, we provide links to information and guidance for employers and workforce solutions providers across the Asia Pacific region. With the rapidly changing status of COVID-19 internationally, you should be aware that some of the advice and guidance in the links provided may have been superseded or updated:  General Guidance and Information Australia  China  Hong Kong  India  Japan  Malaysia New Zealand Singapore Legal Disclaimer: This update is provided solely for the purposes of information and should not be considered legal advice. It is always recommended to seek the advice of qualified legal counsel before taking action.To download a pdf copy of this update, click below: Asia Pacific_COVID19_Legal Update 20200330 - You do not have permission to view this object. General Guidance and InformationCoronavirus: What are an Employer’s Obligations in Various Asian Countries? Littler provides a chart giving a snapshot of the measures being taken in several Asian jurisdictions. Business ContinuityBusiness continuity can be defined as 'the processes, procedures, decisions and activities to ensure that an organization can continue to function through an operational interruption.’ContinuityCentral.com provides updates on business continuity, enterprise risk and resilienceSteps Companies Should Take to Protect Themselves from the Legal Fallout of the Coronavirus, Jones Day HealthWorld Health Organization (WHO) AustraliaEmployers are confronting difficult questions regarding how to handle safety and health rules, travel restrictions, leave and accommodation, immigration, and other employment issues.  Littler provides the answers to some Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) are designed to address some of the more common questions that employers with operations in Australia currently face.The two most common questions at this time according to King & Wood Mallesons are (1) can employees be stood down without pay because of COVID-19? and (2) what options are available to avoid redundancies (which inevitably also leads back to the first question). This article seeks to answer these questions.Australia’s Fair Work Ombudsman provides guidance to help employers and employees understand their rights and responsibilities at work during the coronavirus, outbreak with latest updates and government information. ChinaOn February 7, 2020 the PRC Ministry of Human Resources and Social Security released Twelve Opinions on Stabilizing Labor Relations and Supporting Enterprises’ Resumption of Work and Production. Harris Bracken’s China Law blog gives a short summary of the issues most relevant to foreign companies with employees in China and to expats in China.Employment law around the coronavirus outbreak in China In this article, Withers gives a high-level overview of some major employment issues to be considered by employers in China.Coronavirus: how are 'force majeure' events regulated under PRC laws? Whether your businesses are based in Mainland China or rely on raw materials from there, Withers highlights how the very different legal and regulatory regime in China may impact your business operations. Hong KongIn Hong Kong, COVID-19 has caused serious disruption to the economy and has had a considerable impact on the workforce. On 28 January 2020, the Hong Kong Government announced that its employees (except for staff of the departments providing emergency services and essential public services) were not required to return to their offices and were to work from home starting from 29 January 2020 in order to prevent the spread of COVID-19. The Government also called on institutions in the private sector to adopt similar measures to assist in minimising the threat of COVID-19 spreading in the wider community. Businesses in Hong Kong have adopted a range of measures, up to and including temporarily shutting down their operations.This article from Howse Williams sets out some of the key issues that employers should consider in dealing with the outbreak.Employment Spotlight: Redundancies in Hong Kong Employers may be making more redundancies than usual as Hong Kong finds itself facing a time of political and economic uncertainty. Whether you're an employer or employee, it pays to have a basic understanding of the law regarding redundancies.  Gall provides an overview of the law in Hong Kong. IndiaIndia announced on 26 March an economic stimulus package worth INR 1.7 trillion (approximately USD 22.6 billion) as part of measures to ease the economic impact of the coronavirus pandemic, as reported by SIA’s Daily News.While the government has ordered the temporary closure of educational institutions, gyms, and most other places, King Stubb & Kasiva reports on the measures several state governments have begun to prescribe for offices and other establishments. KSK also provides answers to some FAQs on employment issues around COVID-19. JapanLittler’s Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) are designed to address some of the more common questions that employers with operations in Japan currently face.Employers are also encouraged to consult relevant guidance and FAQs issued by the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare (English) and the Prime Minister’s Office of Japan (English).  MalaysiaMovement Control Order Due to COVID-19: Top 10 FAQS by Employers and Employees On 16 March 2020, the Prime Minister of Malaysia issued an announcement that the Government will implement a Movement Control Order (“MCO”) throughout Malaysia from 18 to 31 March 2020 (“the Controlled Period”) as a measure to curb the outbreak of COVID-19. Tay and Partners summarise the salient points of the Regulations which are relevant to employers and employees. New ZealandCOVID-19 employment update – Government support package and the impacts of Government directives on workplaces In this article, Buddle Findlay outlines the conditions attaching to the Government’s support package and discusses some of the impacts on workplaces of the Government’s recent and expected directives.Buddle Findlay also provides guidance for businesses in New Zealand on managing commercial contracts in the current crisis. SingaporeOn 7 February 2020, due to heightened risk, the Singapore government raised its outbreak alert to Disease Outbreak Response System Condition (“Doscorn”) orange. Employers need to be aware of their obligations and take necessary precautionary measures at the workplace to protect the safety and health of their employees. In this article, Bryan Cave Leighton Paisner discuss some frequently asked questions: COVID-19 (Coronavirus Disease 2019): Key Employment Law Issues.Employers and employees can refer to the FAQs on COVID-19 section on the MOM website, the Updates on COVID-19 (Coronavirus Disease 2019) section on the MOH website and Updates on the COVID-19 situation section on Gov.sg.Legal Disclaimer: This update is provided solely for the purposes of information and should not be considered legal advice. It is always recommended to seek the advice of qualified legal counsel before taking action. […]

  • Outplacement Landscape 2020

    SIA estimates the global outplacement market achieved revenue of USD 3.2 billion in 2019, an increase of 7% over the prior year. While there are a number of specialist providers, outplacement is more normally provided as part of a portfolio of services offered by staffing firms, executive search firms and HR consultants. The outplacement market comprises a small number of large global providers and a long tail of more than 140 small providers. Since the 1980’s, the outplacement market has seen a number of large acquisitions where staffing firms in particular have acquired outplacement expertise, and this has led to a much more consolidated market. Leading vendors include Mercer, LHH (Lee Hecht Harrison) and Right Management, which ManpowerGroup has recently bundled into its Talent Solutions brand alongside its MSP and RPO services. As more and more outplacement firms provide up-skilling and re-skilling solutions, outplacement will increasingly be seen as an important component of workforce planning and a useful tool to facilitate total talent solutions. Download the entire report here:  Outplacement Landscape Report - You do not have permission to view this object. […]