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  • Gross Margin and Bill Rate Trends

    This report lists gross margin for 16 publicly traded staffing companies that do business in the United States. Among these 16 companies, 2017 gross margin ranged from 15.7% to 41.1%, with an average of 25.3%. Unless stated otherwise, gross margin was based on the entire company’s business; companies with more direct hire business were likely to have higher gross margins. Only seven of the 16 companies reported their greatest annual gross margin after 2008, over the period tracked in our table (2004-2017) on page 4. Only four companies reported their greatest gross margin after 2010. One reason annual gross margins have not fully returned to pre-recession levels (2007) is that the direct hire market (unlike the temporary staffing market) has still not recovered to pre-recession levels. However, there has been improvement in recent years. 2017 represents the fourth consecutive year of average gross margin expansion for publicly held staffing companies, after three years of contraction from 2011-2013. This growth trajectory has remained intact through 1H18 with average gross margin expanding by approximately 10 bps y/y. Based on findings from our Staffing Industry Benchmarking Consortium (SIBC) survey, the aggregate gross margin for professional temporary staffing has expanded 660bps over our 7-year tracking period, reaching a high in our 1H17 survey of 25.9%. This is in stark contrast to its commercial counterpart, which expanded just 180bps over the same period to 16.3%. Contributing factors to this  bifurcation include demand for professional staffing generally outpacing commercial staffing and a mix shift within professional staffing, where higher margin segments, such as healthcare and marketing/creative, have outpaced the broader group. There has been a slight convergence in professional and commercial margins more recently however, from a peak differential of 10.6% in 2H15 to 9.4% in 2H17, our most recent survey. Click below to download the full report: Gross Margin and Bill Rate Trends August 20180816 - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • Staffing Firm Use of Process Automation

    Key Findings:Human cloud/online staffing Fourteen percent -- one in seven -- of staffing firms are either “currently partnering with a human cloud service” (5%) or “currently own or have invested in such a service” (9%). Forty-eight percent of staffing firms said they were “aware of such services, but not interested in pursuing.” Another 30% were “considering building, acquiring, or partnering over the next 2 years.” Only 9% are not aware of such services. Those staffing firms invested in the human cloud typically reported investments to be small, in a mid-range of $300,000 to $1 million, representing between 20% and 100% ownership of the respective human cloud companies, and generating between “ Process automation Although the share of traditional staffing firms involved in human cloud services is still limited, most have been automating elements of the staffing process, particularly on the worker side. Across all the individual worker functions queried, a median 53% of staffing firms reported automation; by contrast, across buyer functions a median 26% reported automation. A comparison of functions automated in 2018 vs. 2017 showed only a slight increase for the industry as a whole, but large staffing firms were notable for greater increases in automation activity. There was no consensus that automation would reduce internal staff jobs in the long run, as many thought business expansion would offset automation-related job cuts. To access the complete report, please select the link below: North America Staffing Company Survey 2018 Human cloud online staffing, and use of 20180814 - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • Buyer Survey 2018 Full Report

    This report comprises both the 2018 Workforce Solutions Buyer Survey results and information from previous editions of this survey, going back to 2009. A few examples of the research findings you will find in our latest survey are: Contingent share of workforce: Respondents reported a median 20% and average (mean) 22% contingent share of their total workforce. The average of 22% for 2018 is roughly similar to levels in 2017 (21%) and 2016 (22%). Use of supplier management strategies: Of the supplier management strategies listed in our survey, the most common by far was use of a VMS (vendor management system) with 87% of respondents noting they have one in place. Use of an MSP (managed service provider) was second, at 68%. Over the past several years, the share of respondents using a VMS has continued to climb while the share using an MSP has slightly regressed. Satisfaction with suppliers: On a scale from 0 to 10 (with 10 equal to “very likely”), we asked organizations whether they would recommend their various workforce solutions suppliers. The average scores for staffing supplier, VMS and MSP were favorable, with 7.56, 7.32 and 7.27, respectively. The average scores for ATS (applicant tracking system), job board and RPO (recruitment process outsourcing) were less than favorable, with 5.88, 6.32 and 6.17, respectively. Assignment limits: The share of respondents noting they have assignment limits for contingent workers was 71%, up from 64% in 2015, (the last time asked in our survey). Among those indicating they have assignment limits, the median assignment length was 18 months. The 25th and 75th percentiles were 1 year and 2 years, respectively. MSP features for statement-of-work projects: Of the features listed in the survey, the three most commonly indicated were “on/offboarding SOW workers” (33%), “invoicing and bill-pay services” (31%) and “tracking milestones and deliverables” (18%). The full report can be downloaded by clicking the link below: WF Solutions Buyer Survey 2018 Americas Full Report 20180812 - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • Largest IT Staffing Firms in the United States: 2018 Update

    Key Findings We estimate that 47 firms generated at least $100 million in US information technology temporary staffing revenue in 2017. Added together, these firms generated $19.1 billion in such revenue, accounting for 64% of the market, by our estimates. The complete list of 47 firms can be found starting on page three of this report. In this market share report, we have ranked companies in order of revenue size, according to industry custom, but this ranking should not be taken to imply that a firm with a higher rank provides better service or more value to its shareholders. Staffing firms varied in degree of financial transparency, and even when forthcoming with information, in some cases data provided was adjusted for greater accuracy and consistency. Therefore, for all firms in this report, revenue shown should be considered an estimation by Staffing Industry Analysts. Market share percentages in this report were calculated by dividing each company’s revenue figure by our estimate of $29.9 billion for the US IT temporary staffing market in 2017. Overall, we believe that this list is accurate and can be used appropriately to get a “big picture” reading of the US IT temporary staffing industry landscape. However, as transparency and availability of information from staffing companies can vary from one year to the next, this year’s estimates may not be comparable to those of previous years in all cases. For that reason, we did not display prior year revenue estimates in this report. Seven firms are included on this year’s ranking that did not appear in last year’s report: ALKU, BG Staffing, Compunnel Software Group, Mindlance, Rose International, System One and VACO. Additional details on the methodology of this report are provided on page seven. Please select the following link to download the full report: Largest IT Staffing Firms in the US 20180808 - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • Office Clerical Staffing in the UK

    This report provides an overview of the UK Office Clerical staffing market.The broad outlook for the UK office clerical staffing industry is mostly negative due to technology advancement and computerisation.Nevertheless, some higher-level roles are creating recruiting and retention challenges.This report includes a ranking of the largest Office Clerical staffing providers in the UK by revenue.It also includes a definition of the sector, a profile of the UK Office Clerical staffing market and future trends and analytics.This report should be read in conjunction with our Largest Staffing Firms in the UK and Most Attractive Staffing Sectors in the UK report.To download the full report, click below: UK Office Clerical 20180816 - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • UK Staffing Firm Process Automation

    Key Findings:Human cloud/online staffing Thirteen percent -- nearly one in seven -- of staffing firms reported they are either “currently partnering with a human cloud service” (3%) or “currently own or have invested in such a service” (10%). Another 59% said they “considering building, acquiring, or partnering over the next two years.” Twenty-four percent are “aware of such services, but not interested in pursuing.” Only 3% of staffing firms were not aware of such services. Process automation Although the share of traditional staffing firms involved in human cloud services is still limited, most have been automating elements of the staffing process. Across all the individual worker functions queried, a median 28% of staffing firms reported automation; across buyer functions a median 29% reported automation. To access the complete report, please select the link below: UK Staffing Company Survey 2018 Human cloud online staffing, and use of 20180814 - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • Europe Staffing Firm Process Automation

    Key Findings:Human cloud/online staffing Roughly a third of staffing firms reported they are either “currently partnering with a human cloud service” (6%) or “currently own or have invested in such a service” (27%). Another 24% were “considering building, acquiring, or partnering over the next 2 years.” Thirty-six percent of staffing firms said they were “aware of such services, but not interested in pursuing.” Only 6% are not aware of such services. Process automation Although the share of traditional staffing firms involved in human cloud services is still limited, most have been automating elements of the staffing process. Across all the individual worker functions queried, a median 31% of staffing firms reported automation; across buyer functions a median 29% reported automation. To access the complete report, please select the link below: Europe Staffing Company Survey 2018 Human cloud online staffing, and use of 20180814 - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • Building an Effective Staffing Website

    • Your website provides you with an opportunity to showcase your business on a relatively equal basis to your competitors. With the right approach, there is no reason why smaller staffing firms can’t develop a very effective online presence to rival their larger peers.• Displaying, searching and applying for jobs has to be the core functionality for any staffing website. Those that get this wrong are simply wasting the opportunities available to them from having a presence on the Internet. Google for Jobs is a total game changer for online recruitment and no staffing websites can afford to ignore it.• Staffing firms where relations between the heads of marketing and IT are poor will struggle to develop an effective website strategy.• Putting information on a website once you have purchased the domain and found somewhere to host your content is free so economy of information is not a virtue.• Search Engine Optimisation is mostly about maintaining your website in a consistent fashion and using some basic principles to ensure visibility is continually maximised. Many SEO initiatives fail because the effort put in at the beginning is not followed through on a day-to-day basis.• Gone are the days when websites existed in isolated splendour and many staffing firms will integrate their website with their front and/or back office, as well as other systems. There are clear efficiencies to be gained from creating such smooth workflows.• Given anticipated growth in website traffic from mobile users, the smart approach today is to design and optimize your website for mobile devices first and only then adapt for the desktop.• A very recent addendum to the job application process is the use of recruitment chatbots. Over the past 12 months we have seen the launch of a number of chatbots that can automate a large portion of the recruitment process and ease administrative burdens for staffing firms.• The world is going through a new wave of automation and recruitment is a prime area for disruption. The evolution of Web 3.0 built on new technologies is heralding yet another period of upheaval.To download a copy of the report, click blow: Building an Effective Staffing Website 20180807 - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • Building an Effective Staffing Website

    • Your website provides you with an opportunity to showcase your business on a relatively equal basis to your competitors. With the right approach, there is no reason why smaller staffing firms can’t develop a very effective online presence to rival their larger peers.• Displaying, searching and applying for jobs has to be the core functionality for any staffing website. Those that get this wrong are simply wasting the opportunities available to them from having a presence on the Internet. Google for Jobs is a total game changer for online recruitment and no staffing websites can afford to ignore it.• Staffing firms where relations between the heads of marketing and IT are poor will struggle to develop an effective website strategy.• Putting information on a website once you have purchased the domain and found somewhere to host your content is free so economy of information is not a virtue.• Search Engine Optimisation is mostly about maintaining your website in a consistent fashion and using some basic principles to ensure visibility is continually maximised. Many SEO initiatives fail because the effort put in at the beginning is not followed through on a day-to-day basis.• Gone are the days when websites existed in isolated splendour and many staffing firms will integrate their website with their front and/or back office, as well as other systems. There are clear efficiencies to be gained from creating such smooth workflows.• Given anticipated growth in website traffic from mobile users, the smart approach today is to design and optimize your website for mobile devices first and only then adapt for the desktop.• A very recent addendum to the job application process is the use of recruitment chatbots. Over the past 12 months we have seen the launch of a number of chatbots that can automate a large portion of the recruitment process and ease administrative burdens for staffing firms.• The world is going through a new wave of automation and recruitment is a prime area for disruption. The evolution of Web 3.0 built on new technologies is heralding yet another period of upheaval.To download a copy of the report, click blow: Building an Effective Staffing Website 20180807 - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • APAC Financial Calendar 2018/2019

    See how your competitors or suppliers are faring. Get a spreadsheet you can upload into Outlook. Remember most of the events listed will be covered in the Daily News.The spreadsheet below is formatted to be uploaded into the Outlook Calendar.  Save the file to your desktop without opening it  Open Outlook if necessary Create a new calendar (right click on the existing calendar icon) in the folder view. Go to File – Open & Export – Import/Export Select Import from another program or file. Select Comma Separated Values (DOS) Select the file to import from your desktop Allow duplicates to be created Select the new calendar created in step three. Hit the finish button. The instructions are for Outlook 2013.To download the spreadsheet, click below: Financial Calendar APAC 20180725 - You do not have permission to view this object. If you have any updates, changes or new information, or a problem with the process above please don’t hesitate to contact me via the email address to the right. […]

  • Asia Pacific Legal Update Q2 2018

    In this report, we round up the legal developments affecting the workforce solutions ecosystem across the Asia Pacific region in Q2 2018:Australia: Minimum Wage Increase 1 July 2018; South Australia Postpones Labour Hire Licensing Scheme; New Long Service Leave and Portable Benefits for Victoria Employees Hong Kong: Amended Rules on Employment AgenciesJapan: Government Passes Reform on Overtime and Atypical Working ConditionsNew Zealand: Labour Hire Contractors Found to be Employees of the End-UserPhilippines: Bill Proposes Limiting Fixed-Term Employment and Labour-Only SubcontractingSingapore: Employment Act Changes from 1 July 2018; Tripartite Standard on Contracting with Self-Employed Legal Disclaimer: This update is provided solely for the purposes of information, and should not be considered legal advice. It is always recommended to seek the advice of qualified legal counsel before taking action.To download a pdf copy of this update click below: AsiaPacific_LegalUpdate_Q2_20180716 - You do not have permission to view this object. Australia 1. Minimum Wage Increase 1 July 2018On 1 June 2018, the Fair Work Commission increased the minimum wage by 3.5 percent or AUD 24.30 (USD 18.11) per week. The new weekly minimum wage will be AUD 719.20 per week (USD 536.23) or AUD 18.93 per hour (USD 14.11). The changes will come into effect on 1 July 2018. 2. South Australia Postpones Labour Hire Licensing SchemeThe new labour hire licensing law in South Australia commenced on 1 March 2018 and requires all providers to apply for a licence before 31 August 2018 to be compliant with the new scheme. However, the State Government received submissions from stakeholders raising various issues in relation to the labour hire licensing scheme. To enable proper consideration of the submissions received and to allow sufficient time for the issues raised to be appropriately addressed, the Government has advised that the Consumer and Business Services (CBS) department will not enforce the licensing requirements prior to 1 February 2019. To obtain a licence in South Australia, businesses must show that they are fit and proper to be a licence holder; and have sufficient financial resources to carry on the business properly under the licence. In addition to the application fee, businesses must pay an annual fee of AUD 1,200 (USD 895).The maximum penalty for a business providing or engaging in unlicensed labour hire services is AUD 400,000 (USD 300,000). Penalties may also apply where businesses attempt to enter into arrangements designed to circumvent the obligations; or provide officials with false or misleading information about their contracting arrangements.Labour hire businesses in South Australia are advised to postpone seeking a licence until further information is available from CBS.Herbert Smith Freehills provides an update on some of the other developments in Australia’s labour hire licensing laws. 3. New Long Service Leave and Portable Benefits for Victoria EmployeesOn 8 May 2018 the Victorian Parliament passed the Long Service Leave Bill 2017 (Vic) which will commence by 1 November 2018.The Long Service Leave Act 2018 (Vic) will allow employees to apply to take long service leave after seven years’ service. Any period of paid parental leave, and up to 12 months of unpaid parental leave, will count towards an employee’s length of continuous service, and no amount of parental leave will break continuity of service. However, the rate at which long service leave accrues under the new Act will not change.These changes will impact all employees in Victoria, unless they are specifically excluded from the operation of the Act. The changes will apply to any requests to take long service leave after the commencement of the Act (being no later than 1 November 2018).In addition, the Victorian Government introduced the Long Service Benefits Portability Bill 2018 (Vic) on 27 March 2018. The Bill passed the Legislative Assembly and was debated in the Legislative Council on 9 May 2018. The proposed commencement date is 1 April 2019.The Bill seeks to provide long service leave entitlements to workers in the contract cleaning, community services and securities industries, who perform essentially the same role under various contracts after working for seven years, irrespective of the number of employers that the individual works for over that time.Employers in these industries will be required to register themselves and their employees and contractors with a new Portable Long Service Benefits Authority, which will manage the scheme. Employers will pay a levy based on the ‘ordinary pay’ of each employee to finance the payment of entitlements.Herbert Smith Freehills provides further information on these developments. Hong Kong Amended Rules on Employment AgenciesOn 9 February 2018, the government amended Part 12 of the Employment Ordinance on Employment Agencies and the Employment Agency Regulations. The amendments increase the maximum penalty for overcharging commission from job-seekers and for operating an unlicensed employment agency from HKD 50,000 (USD 6,370) to HKD 350,000 (USD 44,590) and imprisonment for three years. The offence of overcharging is not only limited to the licensee, but also includes the recruitment agency’s associates (including any director, manager, or employee of a licensee).The amendment introduces new grounds for the Commissioner for Labour to refuse an issuance or renewal, or to revoke a licence where the licensee has been non-compliant with the Code of Practice for Employment Agencies. Japan Government Passes Reform on Overtime and Atypical Working ConditionsThe Japanese government has passed a Bill for Legislation for Promotion of Work Style Reform. the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare will prepare the draft legislation. Some of the key provisions are as follows: Limits on Overtime: In principle, overtime will be limited to 45 hours per month and 360 hours per year. Even in special circumstances where certain exceptions apply, overtime must be less than 100 hours a month, the monthly overtime average over multiple months may not exceed 80 hours, and annual overtime must not exceed 720 hours. Establishing a Sophisticated Professional System: This system would exempt individuals engaged in specialised work from regulations on working hours, and would strengthen measures for the protection of employee health. For example, this would provide employees with at least 104 days of holiday.  Securing Fair Working Conditions Regardless of Employment Type: This will aim to further eliminate some of the “unreasonable” differences of benefits offered in the terms and conditions of regular employees and those of part-time employees, fixed-term employees, and dispatched employees. On this last proposal, two recent cases illustrate the disparity that often exists between regular employees and these atypical workers. On 1 June 2018, the Supreme Court ruled that Article 20 of Japan’s Labour Contract Law prohibits irrational or unreasonable discrimination based on employment status, i.e., against those on fixed-term rather than permanent employment contracts. Article 20 does not require equal treatment but prohibits irrational disparity that is not related to the type of work, the level of responsibility or other reasonable circumstances.It is anticipated that some provisions of the legislation will be effective from 1 April 2019. New Zealand  Labour Hire Contractors Found to be Employees of the End-UserIn Prasad v LSG Sky Chefs New Zealand Limited, the Auckland Employment Court addressed a claim that two workers engaged as independent contractors through a labour hire agency were actually employed by the end-user company.The Court concluded that the workers were employed by the end-user, on the basis that there was non-existent or unclear contractual documentation about the relationship between the parties, there was a significant degree of control by the end-user company over the workers, and the work was for an indefinite period. In deciding this issue, the Court looked at the “real nature” of the relationship between the workers and end-user company and how this operated in practice. The Court concluded that the contracts were poorly drafted, and the workers were “steam-rolled into signing a document which they had no real understanding of”. The Court also found that the relationship was more analogous with an employer-employee relationship than independent contractors. For example, the workers worked solely for the end-user company, had little control over when, how or what work they did, wore the uniforms of the end-user company, and complied with the end-user’s practice of filling out time sheets. The Court compared the workers with employees directly employed by the end-user company, and found little distinction between the two in practice.The Court, in its judgement stated: “A labour-hire agreement does not represent an impenetrable shield to a claim that the “host” is engaging the worker under a contract of service. Much will depend on the facts of the individual case and an analysis of the real nature of the relationship, including how it operated in practice. That is, of course, nothing more than a simple statement of the way in which s 6 [Employment Relations Act 2000] is intended by the Legislature to operate.”In line with the current trend in other countries, the New Zealand Employment Court took a “substance over form” approach in this decision and demonstrated that workers will not automatically be considered independent contractors because of the label given to them. Instead, this depends on the merits of each case and will be highly factual. This decision also emphasises the importance of ensuring an unambiguous and properly drafted agreement is in place between the workers and the agency employer, to clearly document the agreement between all the parties. Philippines Bill Proposes Limiting Fixed-Term Employment and Labour-Only SubcontractingEarlier this year the House of Representatives approved a bill that would amend the existing Labour Code to ban fixed-term contracts aimed at stopping the abuse of workers’ rights. House Bill 6908, entitled "An Act Strengthening the Security of Tenure of Workers, Amending for the Purpose Presidential Decree No. 442, as amended, otherwise known as the Labour Code of the Philippines" would also restrict the use of labour-only subcontracting. The bill is yet to be approved by the Senate.If passed into law, the measure would ban the use of fixed-term contracts to end a practice known as “endo” or “end-of-contract”. This is where an employer hires an employee on successive five-month contracts to bypass the law which deems employment to be regular after six months’ probation. Fixed-term employment would be prohibited, except in the cases of employing overseas Filipino workers, workers on probation, temporary replacements of permanent employees who are absent, seasonal workers and workers engaged for a specific project to be determined by the employer upon hiring.It provides that the rights and benefits of such fixed-term employees shall be on a par with regular employees. A probationary employee who has rendered at least one month of service would be entitled to a termination payment of 1/2 month's salary.Among the key provisions of HB 6908 is a prohibition on labour-only subcontracting under Article 106 of the Labor Code. This is defined as being the provision of labour by a contractor when any of the following is present: the contractor does not have substantial capital or investment in the form of tools, equipment, machineries, work premises etc.; the contractor has no control over the workers' methods and means of accomplishing their work; the contractor's workers are performing activities which are directly related to the principal business of the employer. The legal framework for this already exists but has not been fully implemented before now.In addition, the bill would require all persons or entities operating as job contractors to obtain a license from the Department of Labour and Employment. The amendments would also impose heavier penalties on employers who violate their workers' right to security of tenure: PHP 30,000 (USD 600) for a person or entity operating as a job contractor without a license, as long as the person or entity does not commit other violations in the code; A fine of PHP 30,000 (USD 600) for those unlicensed contractors who practice labour-only contracting per employee, with the fine not exceeding PHP 5 million (USD 93,250). The person or entity shall also be barred from applying for future licenses; A PHP 30,000 (USD 600) fine per employee for licensed contractors practicing labour-only contracting. Their license will also be revoked; A PHP 30,000 (USD 600) fine per employee for persons or entities that engages fixed-term employees, with the fine not exceeding PHP 5 million (USD 93,250). The measure would deem illegal dismissal "without just or authorized cause or without observance of procedural due process." A worker is entitled to reinstatement pending appeal and should not lose existing seniority rights and privileges, benefits, back wages, and the like.It has been said that a ban on fixed-term contracts to cure the abuse of these contracts by employers is like “curing a headache by lopping off the head”. There is resistance from employers and some have argued there should be better enforcement of existing rules. The bill is yet to be passed by the Senate so it is unclear whether this measure will be passed in its proposed form. If it is, employers and staffing agencies should take legal advice as to the impact of these two provisions on existing and future staffing arrangements. Singapore 1. Employment Act Changes from 1 July 2018Singapore’s Employment Act (“EA”) has undergone its first comprehensive review since 2012 providing a significant overhaul to Singapore’s employment law landscape.The key changes include: Widening the scope of the EA to apply to all employees regardless of salary levels. It is expected the EA will offer protection to professionals, managers and executives who have not previously been covered giving rights to paid sick leave, overtime and other benefits. An increase in the salary cap for non-workmen i.e. white-collar workers, from SGD 2,500 (USD 1,835) to SGD 2,600 (USD 1,910). This will mean more workers are entitled to protection over hours of work and rest days. An extension of the right to annual leave to all employees. Extending the Fair Consideration Framework (i.e. guidelines governing the fair consideration of Singaporeans for all job opportunities) which applies to all companies in Singapore. At present, employers with more than 25 employees and jobs which pay a fixed salary of more than SGD 12,000 (USD 8,816) per month are exempt from the framework. With effect from 1 July 2018, the Fair Consideration Framework will apply to all employers with at least 10 workers and for jobs paying less than SGD 15,000 (USD 11,000) per month. Increase in minimum qualifying salary for S Pass holders (mid-level skilled foreigners) – There will be an increase in the minimum qualifying monthly salary for S Pass Holders from SGD 2,200 (USD 1,616) to SGD 2,400 (USD 1,763) in two (2) phases: increase to SGD 2,300 (USD 1,690) (effective 1 January 2019) increase to SGD 2,400 (effective 1 January 2020). The majority of these changes are expected to come into force on 1 April 2019. 2. Tripartite Standard on Contracting with Self-EmployedIn February 2018, the Tripartite Workgroup (TWG), formed in 2017 to identify common challenges faced by self-employed persons (SEPs) and develop recommendations to address these challenges, submitted its report to the Government. As a result of its recommendations a Tripartite Standard on Contracting with Self-Employed Persons has been developed.SEPs refer to persons who operate their own trade or business. Those who do not employ any paid workers and are not contributing family members are also known as “own account workers”, “freelancers” or “independent contractors”.The Tripartite Standard is aimed at providing a non-binding set of guidelines or best practices for businesses to engage SEPs or freelance services. For example, specific key terms of engagement are to be agreed with any SEPs and set out in writing before any production or services are delivered.Businesses that adopt the Tripartite Standard can use its logomark in their corporate and marketing collateral to distinguish themselves and allow SEPs to easily identify service-buyers and intermediaries that follow best practice. Legal Disclaimer: This update is provided solely for the purposes of information, and should not be considered legal advice. It is always recommended to seek the advice of qualified legal counsel before taking action. […]

  • Buyer Survey APAC IF 2018

    Key Findings: This report contains initial findings of the 2018 Workforce Solutions Buyer Survey, including survey questions and unanalyzed summary statistics. These findings are based on a survey conducted in May-June 2018, and reflect the opinions of respondents from 50 companies with contingent workforce programs or workforce solutions providers operating in the APAC (Asia/Pacific) region. A map defining the different regions appears on page 13. (Programs may or may not operate in other regions as well, but all programs included in this report have operations in the APAC region.) To qualify for the survey, companies were required to have 1,000 or more employees (not including contingent workers). Only one respondent per company was used. More detailed analyses of these survey responses will be released in separate reports. The full report can be downloaded by clicking the link below: WF Solutions Buyer Survey 2018 APAC Initial Findings 20180705 - You do not have permission to view this object. […]