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  • A Look At the Workforce Environment in the United States of America

    Key Points: The U.S. remains the World’s largest market in terms of revenue generated by temporary agency work. The US ranks 55th in the world for ease of starting a business but is 6th in terms of ease of doing business according to the World Bank rankings for 2020. The U.S. is one of the most liberal staffing markets in the world but the complex interplay between federal, state and local laws creates administrative burden for employers. Rules governing the use and provision of labor and temporary labor are found throughout U.S. federal and state legal sources. This report covers the commercial requirements for setting up and running a staffing business in the U.S., the different models of supplying contingent worker solutions, contingent worker rights and legal risks related to employee screening, data protection, health and safety etc. Legal Disclaimer: This report is provided solely for the purposes of information and should not be considered legal advice. It is recommended to seek the advice of qualified legal counsel before taking action.To download a pdf copy of this report, click below:  A Look at the Workforce Environment in the United States of America 20200331 - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • By what metrics should staff be measured?

    Key Findings: Internal staff were asked: “Of the metrics currently used to measure your performance, are there any you would say are not very fair or meaningful? By what metrics do you think productivity for your role should be measured?” The questions were open-ended; staff could make any suggestions they deemed best. Over 11,000 internal staff answered these questions. Results from a randomized subset of these responses were analyzed to identify patterns for each of 15 separate occupations, revealing metrics recommendations for each. Recommendations were naturally different for different occupations, but some general observations may also be made. Roughly four-fifths of internal staff are satisfied with how their performance is being measured -- but one in five internal staff are either not satisfied with the metrics by which they are judged or simply have no idea what those metrics are. This suggests the need for more buy-in and communication. Call counts and call times were generally the least appreciated metric. Many commented that such metrics are out-of-date given that so much communication happens now via emails, texts, etc., and because many people will not answer a phone number unknown to them. Some respondents commented that metrics should be applied in hierarchical fashion, in particular that end-goal metrics (placements, revenue, gross margin, etc.) should be the primary measures, but that when employees (particularly new employees) failed to meet the end-goal metrics, then activity-type metrics (calls, meetings, interviews, submittals, etc.) were appropriate as a fallback. To access the complete report, please select the link below: North America Internal Staff Survey 2020 By what metrics should staff be measured 20200326 - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • Americas COVID-19 Legal Update

    In this report, we provide links to information and guidance for employers and workforce solutions providers across North and Latin America. With the rapidly changing status of COVID-19 internationally, you should be aware that some of the advice and guidance in the links provided may have been superseded or updated: General Guidance and Information North America Canada United States Latin America Brazil Colombia Costa Rica Mexico. Puerto Rico Legal Disclaimer: This update is provided solely for the purposes of information and should not be considered legal advice. It is always recommended to seek the advice of qualified legal counsel before taking action.To download a pdf copy of this update, click below: Americas_COVID19_Legal Update 20200325 - You do not have permission to view this object. General Guidance and Information Business ContinuityBusiness continuity can be defined as 'the processes, procedures, decisions and activities to ensure that an organization can continue to function through an operational interruption.’ContinuityCentral.com provides updates on business continuity, enterprise risk and resilienceSteps Companies Should Take to Protect Themselves from the Legal Fallout of the Coronavirus, Jones Day HealthWorld Health Organization (WHO) North America CanadaCOVID-19 and workplace government updates: Fasken provides a daily Workplace Wrap-up on COVID-19 measures across CanadaLittler’s Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) are designed to address some of the more common questions that employers with operations in Canada currently face.Employers are also encouraged to consult relevant guidance and FAQs issued by the Canadian government: Health information and advice Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) – Benefits and services Canadian Federal Government has made changes to Employment Insurance Sickness Benefits and the Work-Sharing Program. These are summarized by Littler here. Canada’s COVID-19 Economic Response Plan: On March 18, 2020, the Prime Minister announced a new set of economic measures to help stabilize the economy during this challenging period. These measures, delivered as part of the Government of Canada’s COVID-19 Economic Response Plan, will provide up to $27 billion in direct support to Canadian workers and businesses. United States Compliance issuesCOVID-19 and Immigration Updates: Form I-9 Guidance, Border Closures, and More This article briefly summarizes the recent governmental guidance on Form I-9 requirements, travel, and visa processing and services, among other matters, in response to the national emergency caused by the COVID-19 outbreak.  As this is a very fluid and rapidly changing situation, employers should monitor the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) websites and consult with their employment immigration counsel to ascertain whether the guidance has evolved, warranting a reassessment of business strategies.COVID-19: Q&A Specific to Staffing Seyfarth Shaw have produced a guide for staffing firms. Changes in employee roles, furloughs and layoffsEmployment Considerations for Responding to the Coronavirus (Michael Best) - This article addresses some of the Human Resources issues that the coronavirus epidemic presents to U.S. employers.Thinking It Through: Wage and Hour Implications of Employer Responses to the Coronavirus (Littler) This article describes some of the U.S. wage and hour implications resulting from employers’ measures addressing the COVID-19 outbreak, including compensation for employees who are quarantined or furloughed, business expense reimbursement, reporting time pay, and predictive scheduling laws.What You Should Know About the ADA, the Rehabilitation Act, and COVID-19 The EEOC enforces workplace anti-discrimination laws including the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and the Rehabilitation Act, including the requirement for reasonable accommodation and rules about medical examinations and inquiries. Working from home: health and safetyWhat Are Employers’ Legal Responsibilities for the Safety of an Employee’s Home Workplace? An employer who requires or permits employees to work from their homes has limited responsibilities for the safety and health of the employee’s working conditions. In this article from the National Law Review, Ogletree, Deakins, Nash, Smoak & Stewart, P.C. explain what they are.Is COVID-19 Recordable or Reportable to OSHA? In this article Jackson Lewis plc provide some answers to address employer concerns about recordkeeping and reporting to OSHA COVID-19 employee illnesses. SecurityCybersecurity, Data Privacy, and Compliance Issues Related to Remote Workers With this unexpected increase in remote workers, many companies are pushing the limits of their existing remote access technology or deploying ad hoc technology and access solutions as quickly as possible. Seyfarth set out some essential things to know about the security risks posed by remote or at-home workers, and a Technical Checklist for remote employees to make sure your corporate data is safe, and you do not risk compliance challenges with data privacy law and requirements. Sick leave, sick pay and benefitsOn March 18, 2020 President Trump signed the Families First Coronavirus Response Act providing $100 billion funding for those affected financially by COVID-19. It will go into effect on April 2, (15 days after enactment) and remains in force until December 31, 2020. On March 24, U.S. Department of Labor published guidance explaining paid sick leave and expanded family and medical leave under the Families First Coronavirus Response ActThe main points are as follows: Qualified need related to a public health emergency (reason) for leave: The employee is unable to work due to a need for leave to care for their child because the school or day care has been closed or the childcare provider is unavailable due to a public health emergency. A “public health emergency” here means an emergency with respect to COVID-19 declared by a federal, state, or local authority. Pay: Not less than two-thirds of the employee’s regular pay, up to $200/day and $10,000 over the benefit period. The first 10 days taken may be unpaid, but the employee may use other paid leave during that period, if available. Duration of leave: 12 weeks, which includes job protection as required in the Family and Medical Leave Act (including amendments to it made by this Act with regard to job protection requirements for an employer who employs fewer than 25 employees). Benefits are not retroactive. Eligible employees: Employee must have worked for the employer for at least 30 days. Employees shall provide the employer with such notice of leave as is practicable. An employer of an employee who is a health care provider or emergency responder may elect to exclude such an employee. Applicable employers: Private businesses with Authority given to the Secretary of Labor: To exclude certain health care providers or emergency responders from the definition of eligible employees and to exempt small businesses with fewer than 50 employees if compliance with the requirements would jeopardize the viability of the business as a going concern. In tandem, the Emergency Paid Sick Leave Act was enacted on March 18, 2020. It also goes into effect on April 2 and remains in force until December 31, 2020. This act applies to, and provides paid sick leave for, all employees (both full and part-time) of covered employers, regardless of the employee’s duration of employment, who are unable to work or telework because of the need to take emergency sick leave. It provides: Qualified reasons for emergency paid sick time leave: An employee is unable to work or telework due to a need for leave because the employee is: subject to quarantine or isolation order, has been advised by a health care provider to self-quarantine due to coronavirus concerns, or is experiencing symptoms of coronavirus and seeking a medical diagnosis. Pay: Employee’s regular pay, up to $511/day and $5,110 over the benefit period. Other qualified reasons for paid sick time leave: An employee is unable to work or telework due to a need for leave because the employee is: caring for an individual who is subject to quarantine or isolation order or has been advised by a health care provider to self-quarantine due to coronavirus concerns; caring for their child if their school or day care has been closed, or the child care provider is unavailable, due to coronavirus precautions; or is experiencing “any other substantially similar condition specified by” the Secretary of Health and Human Services in consultation with the Secretaries of the Treasury and Labor. Pay: Two-thirds of the employee’s regular pay, up to $200/day and $2,000 over the benefit period. Duration and use of leave: An employee shall be entitled to paid sick time of 80 hours for full-time employees and an amount equal to the average number of hours such employee works over a 2-week period for part-time employees. Paid sick leave is available for immediate use and does not require a waiting period or accrual. Benefits are not retroactive. An employer may require that after the first workday or portion thereof an employee receives such leave, an employee follow reasonable notice procedures in order to continue receiving such paid sick time. An employer may not require an employee to use other paid leave provided by the employer to the employee before the employee uses the paid sick time provided under this section for the reasons above. Paid sick time shall not carry over from 1 year to the next. Employers may not require, as a condition of providing such paid sick time, that the employee involved search for or find a replacement employee to cover the hours during which the employee is using paid sick time. Applicable employers: Private businesses with Authority given to the Secretary of Labor: To exclude certain health care providers or emergency responders from the definition of eligible employees and to exempt small businesses with fewer than 50 employees if compliance with the requirements would jeopardize the viability of the business as a going concern. U.S. businesses with fewer than 500 employees will be entitled to claim a series of refundable tax credits if they are required to provide the Emergency FMLA and paid sick leave. allowed against the employer portion of the Social Security taxes. To take advantage of the paid leave credits, businesses can keep and access funds they would otherwise pay to the IRS in payroll taxes. Employers will only be reimbursed if their costs for qualified sick leave or qualified family leave wages exceed the taxes they would owe. Equivalent credits are available to self-employed individuals based on similar circumstancesFurther details of the provisions for sick pay and leave and tax credits are set out in an article by Varnum LLP for the National Law Review.NOTE: The small business exemption for employers with under 50 employees does not apply to staffing firms with more than 50 employees including temporary staff. ASA is lobbying for the definition of a small staffing business to mirror that used by the Small Business Administration of annual revenue not exceeding $30 million.Coronavirus and Benefit Plan Offerings (Michael Best) - As a result of COVID-19, the markets have dropped precipitously and remain volatile – and 401(k) investors are reacting as may be anticipated – running for the hills. Moreover, employees may have heightened concerns about access to appropriate care and treatment if they and their loved ones are impacted. This article provides a few key points to consider from a benefit plan perspective. Supply Chain and Commercial IssuesManaging the Commercial Impact of the Coronavirus: What Claims In-House Counsel Should Expect in the Near Future At the center of the financial impact is the growing disruption to worldwide supply chains across many industries. Foley has put together guidance on some of the potential claims an in-house counsel might expect to see in the wake of the coronavirus outbreak.The Coronavirus: Protecting Your Business from a Sick Supply Chain Michael Best provides advice for manufacturers, distributors, dealers, and parts suppliers who want to avoid or minimize the business impacts and exposure to liability due to the impacts of the virus on the supply chain. Latin America BrazilBrazil declared a state of public disaster (Legislative Decree # 88/2020) on March 18, 2020, which will allow the government to spend beyond the annual budget to assist with health needs and to support employment. The day before, Brazil’s Minister of Economy, Paulo Guedes, announced several measures to mitigate the economic impacts of the coronavirus, which is estimated to have reached R$147 billion. Meanwhile, some large cities in Brazil have implemented their own restrictions to help limit the virus’ spread. Littler explains how the government is reacting to the crisis. ColombiaCOLOMBIA: COVID-19 (Coronavirus) – Employer FAQs Littler provides guidance to address some of the more common questions that employers with operations in Colombia currently face. Costa RicaCOSTA RICA: COVID-19 (Coronavirus) – Employer FAQs Littler provides guidance to address some of the more common questions that employers with operations in Costa Rica currently face. MexicoMinistries of Health and Labor Issue Action Guide for Workplaces against COVID-19 On March 20, 2020, Mexico Ministry of Labor issued an Action Guide for Workplaces against COVID-19 (the “Guide”), recommending steps for employers.MEXICO: COVID-19 (Coronavirus) – Employer FAQs Littler provides guidance to address some of the more common questions that employers with operations in Mexico currently face. Puerto RicoOn March 13, 2020, Puerto Rico’s Department of Labor and Human Resources’ Secretary, Hon. Briseida Torres Reyes, issued Opinion 2020-01 discussing statutory rights and other applicable measures in light of the coronavirus (COVID-19) emergency. Littler sets out the key takeaways from Opinion 2020-01. […]

  • Largest Staffing Firms in Mexico: 2020 Update

    Key Findings: We estimate that USD 2.2 billion in formal staffing revenue was generated in Mexico in 2019, an increase of 4.5% from 2018. There is also a great deal of revenue generated from informal staffing, in which companies are not fully in compliance with Mexican law and tax obligations. The Mexican government has initiated a campaign to combat illegal outsourcing, presenting a potential long-term growth opportunity for the formal staffing market, to the degree more staffing business becomes formalized. In our report, we list the twenty largest companies in terms of 2019 formal staffing revenue generated in Mexico. The list does not include providers of informal staffing. The two largest staffing companies on this list, ManpowerGroup and The Adecco Group, both based outside Mexico, make up 40% of the market by our estimates. Our list has been created using feedback directly from the firms, publicly available information, and information given by the official statistic institute (Instituto Nacional de Estadística y Geografía ). Before the COVID pandemic, we projected 2% revenue growth in the formal Mexican staffing market this year. At this time, we project a contraction in the range of 20%-40%, given the sudden impact of COVID on the economic backdrop. This projection assumes the economy recovers in the third quarter, though the duration of the pandemic, and thus the nature of the recovery, is uncertain. The full report can be downloaded by clicking the link below:  Largest Staffing Firms in Mexico 2020 20200322 - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • Market Snapshot Italy

    Our Market Snapshots provide an executive summary of the international staffing markets in EMEA and APAC.  They can be used as a barometer to assess the relative business environment within each market and are designed to help you whether you are a buyer or supplier of contingent labour; looking to move into a new market place or need to understand the different national factors you will encounter in managing your workforce internationally. You can download the entire report here:  Market Snapshot Italy - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • UK Job Retention Scheme

    Many staffing firms in the UK have seen their work drop dramatically. Leaving firms in financial difficulty as they try to keep their staff and pay their overheads. Under the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme, all UK employers with a PAYE scheme will be able to access support to continue paying part of their employees’ salary for those employees that would otherwise have been laid off during this crisis. This support can be backdated to 1st March and is due to run for the next three months but will be extended if necessary according to the Government.To take advantage of this scheme, you should consider the following steps: Step 1. Companies must designate affected employees as ‘furloughed workers,’ and notify these employees of this change preferably in writing setting out a) the date the furlough starts, b) when it will be reviewed and c) how to keep in contact during the furlough. Employees will remain employed while furloughed. However, to qualify for the scheme, they must not undertake any work for the employer while under this status.Please remember changing the status of employees remains subject to existing employment law and, depending on the employment contract, may be subject to negotiation. Step 2. Companies with furloughed workers should pay 80% of workers’ wages up to £2,500 a month, and they will retrospectively be able to claim for that amount. Employers can choose to pay the remaining 20% of the furloughed employees’ wages or top-up wages above the cap, but they will not be able to claim this back. The ICAEW has an workered illustration of how the scheme might work. Step 3. Currently, employers should use their normal payroll systems, deducting tax and national insurance under the pay as you earn (PAYE) system, although this may change. Step 4. If the company has limited cash flow to pay the wages, it will be expected to borrow the money until the scheme is fully up and running. Using in the first instance, the deferred VAT payments for the quarter until June 2020, which will not have to be paid until March 2021. Smaller firms need to remember to cancel any direct debits for VAT; otherwise, these will still be deducted automatically. Step 5. Firms who need to borrow further are being encouraged to look at the Government’s business interruption loans for smaller companies or the Bank of England’s commercial paper facility, which is suitable for the largest investment-grade companies. Step 6. Information should then be submitted to the HMRC about the employees that have been furloughed and their earnings. Through the planned online portal. This is expected to be up and running at the end of April/beginning of May. Compensation for the payments is expected at the end of May. Remember the scheme is a grant not a loan. Unfortunately, there is a great deal that is not clear yet about the system. For example, does the scheme include pension contributions and can employees who have already been made redundant be retrospectively included in the scheme? Most importantly, for our industry, exactly which employees will qualify? Does the programme include classic agency workers and what about those working with an umbrella company? This is a live document, and we will update you as soon as the answers to these question and any others become clear.What is clear is the Job Retention Scheme does not include self-employed workers. However, there is currently speculation that the Chancellor will introduce a similar scheme using earnings made in recent years as the measures of future payments. Zero hours workers appear to be included and you should assess their salary based on whatthey were paid in February.Please note this article is offered for guidance only. We have just produced our M&A Directory which includes a list of lawyers and financial advisors, and many of these can help through this difficult time. In addition, the UK scheme is just one of many around the world. For those firms with international employees, see the EMEA COVID-19 Legal Update, You may also want to have a look at our Coronavirus (COVID-19) Resource Center on our free resources page.If you have questions or comments about this briefing please use the comments box, we would love to hear from you. […]

  • EMEA COVID-19 Legal Update

    In this report, we provide links to information and guidance for employers and workforce solutions providers across Europe, Middle East & Africa. With the rapidly changing status of COVID-19 internationally, you should be aware that some of the advice and guidance in the links provided may have been superseded or updated: General Guidance and Information.  Europe Belgium France Germany Ireland Italy Luxembourg Netherlands Spain Turkey UK Middle East Africa Legal Disclaimer: This update is provided solely for the purposes of information and should not be considered legal advice. It is always recommended to seek the advice of qualified legal counsel before taking action.To download a pdf copy of this update, click below: EMEA_COVID19_Legal Update 20200325 - You do not have permission to view this object. General Guidance and Information Business ContinuityBusiness continuity can be defined as 'the processes, procedures, decisions and activities to ensure that an organization can continue to function through an operational interruption.’ContinuityCentral.com provides updates on business continuity, enterprise risk and resilienceSteps Companies Should Take to Protect Themselves from the Legal Fallout of the Coronavirus, Jones Day HealthWorld Health Organization (WHO) Europe Belgium Allen & Overy provides advice on many HR-related questions for employers in Belgium. France Employment All employers have a general obligation to take measures necessary to ensure the safety and protect the physical and mental health of their workers. Bird & Bird provide guidance for employers in France. Coronavirus and employer liability | the limits in France Osborne Clarke explains the measures that every employer needs to take to protect its employees and ensure business continuity. France’s Ministry of Labour also provides some information for employers and employees. France: A Guide to Prevent Collapse During Coronavirus Papaya Global provides information on what measures you can take as an employer in France to help preserve your employees while keeping your business intact. Data Protection CNIL, the French Data Protection Authority provides guidance on managing data in the current circumstances. Germany Employers are confronting difficult questions regarding how to handle safety and health rules, travel restrictions, compensation, immigration, and other employment issues. Littler’s Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) are designed to address some of the more common questions that employers with operations in Germany currently face. Germany: A Guide to Prevent Collapse During Coronavirus Papaya Global provides information on what measures you can take as an employer in Germany to help preserve your employees while keeping your business intact. Ireland Littler provides answers to some of the more common questions that employers with operations in Ireland currently face: Employer FAQs Italy Employers are confronting difficult questions regarding how to handle mandatory lockdowns, safety and health rules, travel restrictions, compensation, and other employment issues. Littler’s Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) are designed to address some of the more common questions that employers with operations in Italy currently face. Italy: A Guide to Prevent Collapse During Coronavirus Papaya Global provides information on what measures you can take as an employer in Italy to help preserve your employees while keeping your business intact. Luxembourg Update on information for employers Castegnaro provides information for employers with regard to the Government’s recommendations in the context of COVID-19. Recommendations by the CNPD on the processing of personal data in the context of a health crisis Castegnaro explains the recommendations of Luxembourg’s data protection commissioner regarding the collection of personal data in the context of the Coronavirus. Netherlands Emergency Fund Bridging Employment Replaces the Working Time Reduction Scheme An increasing number of employers in the Netherlands were applying to the Ministry of Social Affairs and Employment for permits to reduce their working hours (Werktijdverkorting, or WTV) arising from the coronavirus (COVID-19) and the resulting government measures. On 17 March 2020, the cabinet revoked the WTV program. The new temporary measure Emergency Fund Employment Bridging (“NOW”) replaces the WTV. In this article, Littler explains the changes. Coronavirus – information for companies in The Netherlands Osborne Clarke gives a brief overview of measures that employers may take as a result of this new situation. This includes both measures to prevent the further spread of the coronavirus and measures to reduce wage costs. Spain After the publication of Royal Decree-Law 8/2020 of 17 March, passing extraordinary urgent measures to face the economic and social impact of COVID-19, Clifford Chance has prepared a guide that includes the different measures to make performance of certain public sector, administrative or private contracts more flexible. Turkey The first case of coronavirus in Turkey was detected on 11 March 2020. The number of cases in Turkey had increased to 1236 in the following 13 days with 30 citizens losing their lives due to this virus. Turkey has taken several steps in order to mitigate the effects of the coronavirus in Turkey. Gün + Partners offer the following insights into the impact of the virus for businesses in Turkey: Coronavirus Support Package Announced on 18 March 2020 and Its Effects on Sectoral Basis Processing of Personal Data in COVID-19 Outbreak What Does Labour Law Say About COVID-19? Impact of Coronavirus on Contracts and Force Majeure UK Managing risk and compliance Gowling WLG has issued a guide which provides advice on the key considerations and actions businesses should take to respond to and manage the risk of COVID-19. Mishcon has also prepared some practical guidance that is available here. This includes guidance on workforce health and safety, insurance, contracts and business continuity. They also set out answers to some of the most frequently asked questions, taking into account the latest Government advice. Gender pay gap reporting: Due to the Coronavirus outbreak, the Government Equalities Office (GEO) and the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) have taken the decision to suspend enforcement of the gender pay gap deadlines for this reporting year (2019/20). Changes in employee roles, furloughs and layoffs Employee Retention Scheme: On Friday 20 March 2020 the Chancellor Rishi Sunak announced an "unprecedented" package of measures to protect millions of people's jobs and incomes as part of the national effort in response to coronavirus (COVID-19). Gowling WLG have summarised the measures. Putting employees on "furlough" to protect jobs – Taylor Wessing outlines the key features set out by the Government, and, where possible without having the published details, flags implications for employers and employees. Will the job retention scheme be available for agency workers? It is not yet clear to what extent various types of contingent worker will qualify under this scheme, writes Osborne Clarke. Immigration problems affecting employees - the most common questions being asked by employers – Fox Williams considers how employers sponsoring foreign workers to work in the UK should manage those workers in the current circumstances. Sick pay and benefits The UK government announced it would bring forward legislation to allow small-and medium-sized businesses and employers to reclaim Statutory Sick Pay (SSP) paid for sickness absence due to COVID-19. Proposed protection for the self-employed: how will Statutory Self-Employment Pay work for contractors and agency workers alongside the Job Retention Scheme? The House of Commons Public Bill Committee has proposed an amendment to the Coronavirus Bill, entitled Statutory Self-Employment Pay (SSEP). Osborne Clarke looks at the proposals. Working from home guidance Employers and employees should be practical, flexible and sensitive to each other's situation when working from home because of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. ACAS provides guidance on health and safety, technology, childcare and setting expectations for your workforce. Travel bans and quarantineGiven the spread of contagion around the world from COVID-19, international travel will be considered a risk for some time to come. Many employers whose employees have to travel for work, may want to require all staff returning from overseas trips to self-isolate for some time to come.If you ask an employee to self-isolate simply because you want to reduce the risk to your other staff, then ordinarily you should continue to pay them in the usual way. Some organisations may have a contractual right to reduce employees’ hours in various ways and it may be possible to serve notice on employees to take holiday if certain conditions are met. However, you should always take legal advice on implementing such policies or making amendments to your contracts. Data protection issues Data protection and coronavirus: what you need to know The UK’s Information Commissioner answers the questions businesses have about managing personal data and specifically health data during the pandemic. Middle East For legal advice on anything related to COVID-19, visit the Coronavirus Insight Centre from Middle East lawyers BSA Law. Can Employers Terminate Employees Due to COVID-19? Where businesses are unable to operate and employees are not working as a result of the COVID-19 outbreak, BSA provides guidance for employers and businesses on the issues and the resulting measures adopted by the UAE government. Africa South Africa Department of Employment and Labour unveil guidelines to deal with Covid-19 at workplaces Legal Disclaimer: This update is provided solely for the purposes of information and should not be considered legal advice. It is always recommended to seek the advice of qualified legal counsel before taking action. &nbs […]

  • Directory of Suppliers to Staffing Firms 2020 - March Update

    The Directory provides a comprehensive range of solutions and services that staffing firms may require to operate their businesses more efficiently and  effectively. 25 different categories ranging from advisors & consultants to payroll funding and back office technologies. Over 1,170 vendors spanning over 60 countries globally. New to this update the addition of the Online Staffing Enabling Technologies (OSET) category.   To download the complete report, please select the following link:  Directory of Suppliers to Staffing Firms 2020 - March Update - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • Asia Pacific COVID-19 Legal Update

    In this report, we provide links to information and guidance for employers and workforce solutions providers across the Asia Pacific region. With the rapidly changing status of COVID-19 internationally, you should be aware that some of the advice and guidance in the links provided may have been superseded or updated:  General Guidance and Information Australia  China  Hong Kong  India  Japan  Malaysia New Zealand Singapore Legal Disclaimer: This update is provided solely for the purposes of information and should not be considered legal advice. It is always recommended to seek the advice of qualified legal counsel before taking action.To download a pdf copy of this update, click below: Asia Pacific_COVID19_Legal Update 20200330 - You do not have permission to view this object. General Guidance and InformationCoronavirus: What are an Employer’s Obligations in Various Asian Countries? Littler provides a chart giving a snapshot of the measures being taken in several Asian jurisdictions. Business ContinuityBusiness continuity can be defined as 'the processes, procedures, decisions and activities to ensure that an organization can continue to function through an operational interruption.’ContinuityCentral.com provides updates on business continuity, enterprise risk and resilienceSteps Companies Should Take to Protect Themselves from the Legal Fallout of the Coronavirus, Jones Day HealthWorld Health Organization (WHO) AustraliaEmployers are confronting difficult questions regarding how to handle safety and health rules, travel restrictions, leave and accommodation, immigration, and other employment issues.  Littler provides the answers to some Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) are designed to address some of the more common questions that employers with operations in Australia currently face.The two most common questions at this time according to King & Wood Mallesons are (1) can employees be stood down without pay because of COVID-19? and (2) what options are available to avoid redundancies (which inevitably also leads back to the first question). This article seeks to answer these questions.Australia’s Fair Work Ombudsman provides guidance to help employers and employees understand their rights and responsibilities at work during the coronavirus, outbreak with latest updates and government information. ChinaOn February 7, 2020 the PRC Ministry of Human Resources and Social Security released Twelve Opinions on Stabilizing Labor Relations and Supporting Enterprises’ Resumption of Work and Production. Harris Bracken’s China Law blog gives a short summary of the issues most relevant to foreign companies with employees in China and to expats in China.Employment law around the coronavirus outbreak in China In this article, Withers gives a high-level overview of some major employment issues to be considered by employers in China.Coronavirus: how are 'force majeure' events regulated under PRC laws? Whether your businesses are based in Mainland China or rely on raw materials from there, Withers highlights how the very different legal and regulatory regime in China may impact your business operations. Hong KongIn Hong Kong, COVID-19 has caused serious disruption to the economy and has had a considerable impact on the workforce. On 28 January 2020, the Hong Kong Government announced that its employees (except for staff of the departments providing emergency services and essential public services) were not required to return to their offices and were to work from home starting from 29 January 2020 in order to prevent the spread of COVID-19. The Government also called on institutions in the private sector to adopt similar measures to assist in minimising the threat of COVID-19 spreading in the wider community. Businesses in Hong Kong have adopted a range of measures, up to and including temporarily shutting down their operations.This article from Howse Williams sets out some of the key issues that employers should consider in dealing with the outbreak.Employment Spotlight: Redundancies in Hong Kong Employers may be making more redundancies than usual as Hong Kong finds itself facing a time of political and economic uncertainty. Whether you're an employer or employee, it pays to have a basic understanding of the law regarding redundancies.  Gall provides an overview of the law in Hong Kong. IndiaIndia announced on 26 March an economic stimulus package worth INR 1.7 trillion (approximately USD 22.6 billion) as part of measures to ease the economic impact of the coronavirus pandemic, as reported by SIA’s Daily News.While the government has ordered the temporary closure of educational institutions, gyms, and most other places, King Stubb & Kasiva reports on the measures several state governments have begun to prescribe for offices and other establishments. KSK also provides answers to some FAQs on employment issues around COVID-19. JapanLittler’s Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) are designed to address some of the more common questions that employers with operations in Japan currently face.Employers are also encouraged to consult relevant guidance and FAQs issued by the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare (English) and the Prime Minister’s Office of Japan (English).  MalaysiaMovement Control Order Due to COVID-19: Top 10 FAQS by Employers and Employees On 16 March 2020, the Prime Minister of Malaysia issued an announcement that the Government will implement a Movement Control Order (“MCO”) throughout Malaysia from 18 to 31 March 2020 (“the Controlled Period”) as a measure to curb the outbreak of COVID-19. Tay and Partners summarise the salient points of the Regulations which are relevant to employers and employees. New ZealandCOVID-19 employment update – Government support package and the impacts of Government directives on workplaces In this article, Buddle Findlay outlines the conditions attaching to the Government’s support package and discusses some of the impacts on workplaces of the Government’s recent and expected directives.Buddle Findlay also provides guidance for businesses in New Zealand on managing commercial contracts in the current crisis. SingaporeOn 7 February 2020, due to heightened risk, the Singapore government raised its outbreak alert to Disease Outbreak Response System Condition (“Doscorn”) orange. Employers need to be aware of their obligations and take necessary precautionary measures at the workplace to protect the safety and health of their employees. In this article, Bryan Cave Leighton Paisner discuss some frequently asked questions: COVID-19 (Coronavirus Disease 2019): Key Employment Law Issues.Employers and employees can refer to the FAQs on COVID-19 section on the MOM website, the Updates on COVID-19 (Coronavirus Disease 2019) section on the MOH website and Updates on the COVID-19 situation section on Gov.sg.Legal Disclaimer: This update is provided solely for the purposes of information and should not be considered legal advice. It is always recommended to seek the advice of qualified legal counsel before taking action. […]

  • Directory of Suppliers to Staffing Firms 2020 - March Update

    The Directory provides a comprehensive range of solutions and services that staffing firms may require to operate their businesses more efficiently and  effectively. 25 different categories ranging from advisors & consultants to payroll funding and back office technologies. Over 1,170 vendors spanning over 60 countries globally. New to this update the addition of the Online Staffing Enabling Technologies (OSET) category.   To download the complete report, please select the following link:  Directory of Suppliers to Staffing Firms 2020 - March Update - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • MSP and VMS Provider Directory 2020

    The MSP and VMS Providers in this directory represent the providers of which SIA has visibility and include companies from all regions; Americas, EMEA and Asia Pacific.Users can apply filters based on whether they are interested in MSP providers, VMS providers, regional capability or a specific industry focus.Providers have shown capability based on the SIA definitions of MSP and VMS outlined below:Managed Service Provider (MSP)A service segment of the Process Outsourcing Industry, MSP is a service whereby a company takes on primary responsibility for managing an organization’s contingent workforce program. Typical responsibilities of an MSP include overall program management, reporting and tracking, supplier selection and management, order distribution and often consolidated billing. The vast majority of MSPs also provide their clients with either a proprietary or third party vendor management system (VMS) and may have a physical presence on the client’s site. An MSP can also be responsible for the client's direct sourcing, may offer MSP services in conjunction with Recruitment Process Outsourcing (RPO) and may or may not be independent of a staffing supplier.Vendor Management System (VMS)An application that acts as a mechanism for business to manage and procure staffing services through third party staffing suppliers (temporary help as well as, in some cases, permanent placement services) as well as outside contract or contingent labor. VMS systems now often include the management of Statement of Work (SOW) consultants and outsourced services within their scope of coverage as well as standard integrations to other talent and procurement applications. Typical features of a VMS include supplier management, order distribution, consolidated billing, risk mitigation, headcount tracking, workforce analytics and significant enhancements in reporting capability over manual systems and processes.Click below to download the directory: MSP AND VMS Provider Directory 20200317 - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • Funders and Advisors Directory

    This directory provides full records for over 30 companies operating in the M&A space around the world. Some firms provide services in just one market while others provide international and cross-border M&A advice and services in up to 40+ countries.An additional 110+ firms who have been identified as providing M&A services to the staffing industry are also shown. We have tried to make this report as exhaustive as possible, but if there are additional companies you believe should be listed, or if you would like to contribute a “full” entry within this directory, please contact the author, shown below.Please note that the information included herein is self-reported and then edited for consistency sake by SIA. We cannot vouch for the accuracy of each record, nor should inclusion in this directory be taken to imply any endorsement of the companies’ services. This copy of the report has been completed in February 2020.If you have any corrections or changes, please contact author listed on the right.To download the full report, please click below: M&A Funders and Advisors 20200318 - You do not have permission to view this object. […]