Global Daily News

  • Hires see record jump in May while job separations see largest decrease

    The number of hires jumped in May by 60.3%, the largest month-over-month increase on record, according to seasonally adjusted numbers released today by the US Bureau of Labor Statistics. The accommodation and food services industry saw the greatest increase in hires with the number rising by 763,000 month over month.Meanwhile, the number of separations in May fell 58.4% from April, the largest decrease on record. Among separations, the number of layoffs and discharges fell by 5.9 million in May to a total of 1.8 million. Quits, where an employee voluntarily leaves a company, rose by 190,000 in May to 2.1 million.The improvements reflect a limited resumption of business activity following the shutdown prompted by the Covid-19 pandemic, the BLS noted.Job openings also rose by 9.0% in May to nearly 5.4 million, but that was still down 26.1% compared to May 2019.Click on chart to enlarge. […]

  • Employment Trends Index up in June, but the coronavirus’ recent resurgence threatens advance

    The Conference Board on Monday reported its Employment Trends Index rose in June to a reading of 49.05 (up from 45.27 in May) after sharp declines in previous months. But not all is rosy; the resurgence of Covid-19 may once again eat into job numbers.“The Employment Trends Index increased for the second consecutive month, but the virus’s recent proliferation threatens those gains and puts the US labor market’s future in an even more precarious position,” said Gad Levanon, head of The Conference Board Labor Markets Institute.“In response to this resurgence, many governments have delayed or reversed their re-opening plans, which could lead to lower hiring,” Levanon said. “Given the possibility of less recruiting and the fact that layoff rates remain high, the upward trend in the number of jobs may not continue. The unemployment rate may plateau or even increase in the coming months.&rdquo […]

  • Italy-based global staffing firm enters US with outplacement acquisition

    GI Group, one of the largest staffing firms in Italy and the 18th-largest in the world, is entering the US market with the acquisition of the outplacement operations of Los Angeles-based CareerArc.The deal closed June 30, the company announced today. CareerArc provides outplacement via a digital solution and has more than 100 career consultants.“With the acquisition of CareerArc Outplacement, we are entering, for the first time in our history, into a strategic market like the United States, the largest in the world for the HR sector,” said Stefano Colli-Lanzi, CEO of GI Group. “Entering into the North American market is in line with our development plan and further consolidates our role as a global player, aiming to reach €6 billion (US$6.8 billion) in turnover in 2023.”GI Group provides outplacement services in Europe with its Italian brand Intoo.Also, the GI Group reported today that 2019 revenue was €2.6 billion (US$2.9 billion), an increase of 13% from 2018.More than half its revenue, 52%, came from Italy, but 28% came from Western Europe and 10% came from China and India.GI Group operates in 29 countries; that number goes up to 57 when including partnerships. […]

  • Uber to acquire fellow human cloud firm Postmates in $2.65 billion deal

    Human cloud firm Uber Technologies Inc. (NYSE: UBER) announced Monday it is acquiring human cloud delivery firm Postmates Inc. for $2.65 billion in an all-stock transaction representing 84 million shares in common stock. The deal is set to close in the first quarter of 2021.“This acquisition is going to allow us to drive continued growth, improve our operating efficiency and accelerate our path to profitability through this combination of Uber and Postmates' scale, technology and complementary geographic strengths,” Uber CEO and Director Dara Khosrowshai said in a conference call.Uber will combine the Postmates business with its Uber Eats business led by Pierre-Dimitri Gore-Coty, VP of Uber’s delivery business. Postmates’ app will continue to run separately, the company plans to combine the merchant and delivery networks.The boards of both Uber and Postmates have approved the transaction, and Postmates shareholders representing more than 55% of outstanding shares have committed to approve the transaction.Postmates had $643 million in gross bookings in the first quarter.Uber CFO Nelson Juseuk Chai said Covid-19 has accelerated the push toward food delivery. […]

  • Covid-19 an opportunity to update social safety nets for nontraditional workers: WEC

    The Covid-19 crisis is an opportunity to update social safety nets in countries around the globe to better serve nontraditional workers such as the self-employed. That was one policy recommendation for world governments in the “Social Impact Report 2020” released Monday by the World Employment Confederation, the organization representing the staffing industry on a global level.Nontraditional workers are more vulnerable during the pandemic, but not all have access to social safety nets, the report said.Only an average 56% of self-employed workers globally have access to social safety net benefits such as unemployment, paid sick leave, general healthcare insurance, pensions and other programs, according to the report. In comparison, an average of 92% of staffing firm workers do and 93% of traditionally employed workers do.“The safety nets built for the 20th century labor market do not work any longer,” Annemarie Muntz, president of the World Employment Confederation, said in a statement. “The variety of work arrangements to choose from today is larger than ever before, providing choice and flexibility to both employers and workers. But security and protection are equally important.”The report cited three policy recommendations for world governments: Basic minimum levels of social protection need to be available and accessible to all workers irrespective of their work arrangement. The Covid-19 crisis provides an opportunity to speed up the innovation of safety nets to accommodate all and by sharing costs, benefits and risks proportionally. Through social dialogue, the private employment services industry has developed initiatives to provide protections for a dynamic workforce, offering inspiration on how safety nets can be reformed to cover workers moving between jobs and across sectors. The report, available online, includes data from 42 countries, including the US. […]

  • Italy – Gi Group reports 13% full year revenue increase and enters US market with acquisition of CareerArc Outplacement

    Italian staffing firm Gi Group announced today revenue of €2.6 billion for the full year 2019, an increase of 13% when compared to the previous year.The group also reported EBITDA of €71.7 million, an improvement of 19.4% compared with 2018.52% of GI Group’s turnover came from Italy, 28% from other Western European countries and 10% from China and India. Overall, countries outside Italy accounted for 48% of total turnover (compared with 45% in 2018).The Italian staffing firm also announced today that it is entering the US market with the acquisition of CareerArc Outplacement.The asset deal to acquire the outplacement arm of CareerArc was completed on 30 June 2020. With this acquisition, the Italian group is strengthening its presence in the career transition and development service sector.CareerArc Outplacement offers career transition and career coaching services, delivered digitally to employees at every level with a team of more than 100 career consultants specialising in different industries.The company, based in California, claims to have developed ‘very innovative proprietary technology’. “Through tech-based intelligence and the experienced support of world class career coaches, CareerArc Outplacement helps transitioning employees land their next job, faster,” CareerArc Outplacement states.“With the acquisition of CareerArc Outplacement, we are entering, for the first time in our history, into a strategic market like the United States, the largest in the world for the HR sector,” Stefano Colli-Lanzi, CEO and Founder of GI Group. “Entering into the North American market is in line with our development plan and further consolidates our role as a global player, aiming to reach €6 billion in turnover in 2023”“We are investing in a career transition service, like CareerArc,” Colli-Lanzi continued, “because in the current situation, with unemployment increasing as a result of the effects of the pandemic, it is becoming very important. We will assist people who are currently without employment to find new solutions, helping them return to the world of work and supporting them to achieve constant employability.”“This operation comes after the peak of the pandemic and represents for us the start of the rebound phase. I think this is a good reason why, right now, our role as labour intermediaries, if done correctly, will provide decisive impetus for recovery, responding to the needs of businesses and people,” Colli-Lanzi said.Financial details of the transaction were not disclosed.Gi Group has 5,000 employees spread over 500 branches worldwide and the group has supported a total of more than 20,000 companies around the world. It has a direct presence in 29 countries (57 via partnerships).Gi Group ranks fourth on Staffing Industry Analysts’ list of Largest Staffing Firms in Italy.&nbs […]

  • Netherlands – Temp workers’ hours down 22%, revenue falls 17%: ABU

    The total amount of hours worked by temporary workers in the Netherlands decreased by 22% in the sixth period (week 21-24, 18 May to 14 June) of 2020, compared to the same period last year, according to the Dutch Federation of Private Employment Agencies (ABU).Covid-19 lockdown measures were introduced in the Netherlands on 13 March. In May the Dutch government began easing its lockdown measures.Revenue in the sixth period decreased by 17% compared to the same period last year.In the administration sector, the number of hours decreased by 25% and turnover decreased by 19% compared to the same period last year.Within the industrial sector, the number of hours decreased by 17% and turnover decreased by 12% compared to the same period last year.In the technical sector, hours worked decreased by 36% and turnover decreased by 29% compared to the same period last year.The next ABU market monitor will be released on 4 August 2020. […]

  • World – May OECD unemployment rate edges down slightly, Q4 may exceed Great Depression levels

    The unemployment rate for countries within the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development edged down to 8.4% in May 2020, from 8.5% in April 2020 as economies around the world were hit by the coronavirus crisis.In February 2020, prior to the pandemic restrictions enacted by many countries, the OECD unemployment rate stood at 5.2%.The number of unemployed people in the OECD area stood at 54.5 million in May.The OECD stated that the lack of variation between April and May is the result of contrasting trends. On the one hand, in the US, as the economy started to re-open, many furloughed workers went back to work, even as other temporary layoffs became permanent. On the other hand, unemployment is increasing or risks becoming entrenched in many other countries.In May 2020, the highest rates were reported in Colombia (21.1%), Spain (14.5%), the US (13.3%) and Canada (13.7%).Looking ahead, the OECD Employment Outlook 2020 says that, even in the more optimistic scenario for the evolution of the pandemic, the OECD-wide unemployment rate may reach 9.4% in the fourth quarter of 2020, exceeding all the peaks since the Great Depression. Average employment in 2020 is projected to be between 4.1% and 5% lower than in 2019. The share of people in work is expected still to be below pre-crisis levels even at the end of 2021.The OECD added that initial public support has been unprecedented in scale and scope, notably through the expansion of job-retention schemes that allow employers to cut the hours their employees normally work while receiving financial support for these unworked hours.Meanwhile, total hours worked have plummeted, falling ten times faster in the first three months of the current crisis than they did in the first three months of the 2008 global financial crisis, in OECD countries for which data are available.José Luis Escrivá – OECD Secretary-General Angel Gurría said, “Building on the swift and decisive initial response to the Covid-19 crisis, countries now need to do everything they can to avoid this jobs crisis turning into a full-blown social crisis. Macroeconomic policies must remain supportive through the crisis to minimise the risk of a prolonged slump and a lost generation of young people whose labour market prospects are durably harmed. Meanwhile, reconstructing a better and more resilient labour market is an essential investment in the future of the next generations.”The OECD added that workers on low incomes are paying the highest price during the pandemic. Top-earning workers were on average 50% more likely to work from home than low earners during the lockdown. At the same time, low-income workers were twice as likely to have to stop working completely, compared to their higher-income peers.“Women have been hit harder than men, with many working in the most affected sectors and disproportionately holding precarious jobs,” the OECD stated. “The self-employed and people on temporary or part-time contracts have been particularly exposed to job and income losses. Young people leaving school or university will struggle to find work and face the risk of long-term damage to their earnings potential.”OECD’s outlook provides a series of recommendations for where countries should focus their efforts to help people and firms through the crisis and reduce the long-term impact.In the short term, continued support for some sectors still affected by containment measures remains vital to protect jobs and well-being.“As prospects of quickly finding new work will remain poor for many, some countries should extend unemployment benefit durations to prevent jobseekers from sliding too quickly into much less generous minimum income benefits,” the OECD stated. “Emergency support for the self-employed should also be re-assessed to improve targeting, restore incentives and ensure fairness.”In the medium term, the OECD stated that countries should address the structural gaps in social protection provisions that the crisis laid bare. “This will involve strengthening adequate income support for all workers, including the self-employed, part-time and other non-standard workers,” the OECD stated. “Firms must also repay the trust governments have invested in them during the emergency phase of the COVID-19 crisis by keeping their workers to the extent possible and investing in their skills. To ensure no one is left behind in the recovery, extending support for vocational education and training is crucial, as well as leveraging social dialogue and collective bargaining to enhance the resilience of the labour market.&rdquo […]

  • UK – Government announces pandemic rescue package to help arts industry including freelancers

    The UK government announced a £1.57 billion support package to help the arts, culture and heritage industries weather the impact of the coronavirus.Thousands of organisations across a range of sectors including the performing arts and theatres, heritage, historic palaces, museums, galleries, live music and independent cinema will be able to access emergency grants and loans.The money, which represents the biggest ever one-off investment in UK culture, will provide a lifeline to vital cultural and heritage organisations across the country hit hard by the pandemic. It will help them stay afloat while their doors are closed. Funding to restart paused projects will also help support employment, including freelancers working in these sectors.Many of the UK’s cultural and heritage institutions have already received unprecedented financial assistance to see them through the pandemic including loans, business rate holidays and participation in the coronavirus job retention scheme. More than 350,000 people in the recreation and leisure sector have been furloughed since the pandemic began.“This new package will be available across the country and ensure the future of these multi billion-pound industries are secured,” the government stated.Prime Minister Boris Johnson said, “This money will help safeguard the sector for future generations, ensuring arts groups and venues across the UK can stay afloat and support their staff whilst their doors remain closed and curtains remain down.”Rishi Sunak, Chancellor of the Exchequer said, “Our world-renowned galleries, museums, heritage sites, music venues and independent cinemas are not only critical to keeping our economy thriving, employing more than 700,000 people, they’re the lifeblood of British culture. That’s why we’re giving them the vital cash they need to safeguard their survival, helping to protect jobs and ensuring that they can continue to provide the sights and sounds that Britain is famous for.”According to the BBC, the arts industry has largely welcomed the government's support package announcement with qualifications.Equity, the performers' union, welcomed the support but its general secretary, Christine Payne, said it was important that the funding didn't just prop up venues."If this investment does not reach creative workers - the actors, dancers, stage management, singers, variety artists, directors, designers, choreographers and many other highly skilled workers in our talent base, we risk the diversity and success of the wider creative industries, worth £112 billion to the economy,” Payne said. "These workers have campaigned for this deal; they can't be left behind."The investment packages includes:·       £1.15 billion support pot for cultural organisations in England delivered through a mix of grants and loans. This will be made up of £270 million of repayable finance and £880 million grants.·       £100 million of targeted support for the national cultural institutions in England and the English Heritage Trust.·       £120 million capital investment to restart construction on cultural infrastructure and for heritage construction projects in England which was paused due to the coronavirus pandemic.·       The new funding will also mean an extra £188 million for the devolved administrations in Northern Ireland (£33 million), Scotland (£97 million) and Wales (£59 million). […]

  • Australia – Over a third of employers say they are hiring: Hays

    Over one third, 35%, of employers in Australia say they are currently hiring, according to a survey by Hays.Conducted in June 2020, the survey of over 1,100 employers also showed that 19% currently have a recruitment freeze in place.Meanwhile, the  survey also points to an increased focus on data and digital engagement. Since the coronavirus crisis first began, 49% of employers surveyed said they have increased their adoption of agile working practices, 38% have increased their focus on digital engagement with their customers, 35% have invested in infrastructure or applications to facilitate remote working and 21% have increased their use of data to analyse business performance.The survey also identified the soft skills employers are prioritising right now when they recruit. Topping the list is communication (45%), followed by adaptability (40%) and team work (39%).Nick Deligiannis, Managing Director of Hays in Australia and New Zealand, said, “Many industries remain active and we’re seeing an uptick in hiring in certain areas. The IT, life sciences, marketing, accountancy, HR and banking fields in particular are seeing jobs being added in key areas.”“While the coronavirus changed the job market almost overnight, there is now an increasing number of opportunities available,” Deligiannis said. “For those looking for their next opportunity, targeting jobs in these areas is a sensible strategy.&rdquo […]

  • Malaysia – Majority of employees willing to be re-trained to ensure their employability: Randstad

    The majority, 87%, of workers in Malaysia are willing to be re-trained to ensure their employability, according to survey data from Randstad.According to the survey, this sentiment is highest among more mature workers, with 92% of respondents aged from 35 to 44 years old feeling so.Meanwhile, 75% of respondents believe younger workers are more attractive to employers due to the “tech-savvy” skills they possess.Randstad stated that, although younger talents are seen to be more desirable for their digital knowledge, employers can’t expect them to drive the organisation’s digital agenda. Instead, companies should foster a workplace culture that embraces a lifelong learning attitude.“Employers should also step up to provide more dynamic and robust training programmes that can help their workforce get to where they want to be,” Randstad stated. “Companies that choose this time to create a learning culture at work and invest in their people will be able to enjoy the benefits of having a highly skilled workforce in driving productivity as well as improving profitability and reputation in the future.”According to Randstad, the Covid-19 pandemic has created an urgent need for employees and job seekers to sharpen their digital literacy skills to remain competitive.“This ‘wake-up call’ may heighten employees’ expectations not just of their employer to upskill them, but also of the government to provide relevant training programmes,” Randstad stated. “As such, companies that embrace technology to pivot their product and service offerings to their customers will emerge stronger from the pandemic.&rdquo […]

  • Australia – June job ads plunge 44.6%: ANZ Bank

    Job advertisements in Australia grew by 44.6% in June 2020 on a seasonally adjusted basis when compared to June 2019, according to data from ANZ Bank.ANZ Bank’s data is based on information provided by the operators of the following sites: Seek.com.au, and the Department of Education, Skills and Employment’s Australian JobSearch site (Jobsearch.gov.au).Overall, in June 2020 there was a total of 89,252 job ads.When compared to the previous month, job ads grew by a record 42.0% in June. ANZ noted week-to-week movements were positive as well, showing consistent improvement throughout the month amid the easing of Covid-19 restrictions across most of Australia during June.Despite the rebound in June, ANZ job ads were still 41% lower than they were in February 2020, before the pandemic began to impact the labour market.“After an initial bounce, we expect the recovery will be a lot slower,” ANZ Bank stated. “There have been a number of recent large-scale lay-offs announced across a wide range of sectors, including travel, retail, media, consulting, and education.&rdquo […]

  • Japan – Fujitsu announces permanent work-from-home plan amid pandemic (BBC)

    The BBC reports Japanese information and communication technology company Fujitsu said it will halve its office space in Japan as it adapts to the "new normal" of the coronavirus pandemic. The company says the "Work Life Shift" programme will offer unprecedented flexibility to its 80,000 workers in the country. Staff will be able to work flexible hours, and working from home will be standard wherever possible. Fujitsu told BBC it "will introduce a new way of working that promises a more empowering, productive, and creative experience for employees that will boost innovation and deliver new value to its customers and society". Under the plan employees will "begin to primarily work on a remote-basis to achieve a working style that allows them to flexibly use their time according to the contents of their work, business roles, and lifestyle". The company also said that the programme will allow staff to choose where they work, whether that is from home, a major corporate hub or a satellite office. Fujitsu said it believes that that the increased autonomy offered to its workers will help to improve the performance of teams and increase productivity. The announcement follows a similar move by tech companies including Twitter and Facebook. […]

Latest Research

  • North America Temporary Worker Survey 2020: Temporary worker interest in training

    Key Findings: Training is a relative weak spot in temp satisfaction with agencies. Survey respondents were queried on eight aspects of their experience with agencies -- issues such as politeness, trust, availability of assignments, etc. Training opportunities offered by staffing firms scored the lowest level of satisfaction. About half of temps say training would be a “huge benefit.” Temporary workers were asked: “If your staffing firm offered free training opportunities, to what degree (on a 0-6 scale) would that interest you?” Forty-seven percent of temporary workers -- nearly half -- selected “6,” the highest level of enthusiasm and another 10% selected “5.” Enthusiasm was moderately strong across all temporary worker age, pay, and occupation demographics. One in seven temps would go so far as to pay staffing firms for training. Respondents were particularly interested in training that would make them more marketable, in some cases specifically mentioning training in computer science and/or office skills. A few were looking for certifications as well. Temporary worker interest in training has also been a minor recurring theme across past SIA surveys. Lack of training was one of several issues cited by temps as a shortcoming in their preparation for given assignments. Buyer clients also don’t seem to excel at training. Inadequately trained temps are at risk of quitting jobs early. Staffing firms commonly fail to communicate the training options they do offer. When asked how temps thought the industry could improve its reputation, more training was one of the suggestions. To access the complete report, please select the link below: North America Temporary Worker Survey 2020 Temporary worker interest in training 20200707 - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • US Staffing Industry Forecast

    Key Findings After a tumultuous first half of the year, the US economy appears to be gradually recovering, even as coronavirus cases have risen in the last couple of weeks. While uncertainty and risk remains elevated from the pandemic, we present an updated forecast for the US staffing industry, with growth rates and market sizes displayed on the table on pages 9 and 10. Key assumptions of this July forecast update include: 1) masks, social distancing, and other measures provide enough containment of the virus such that widespread lockdowns do not recur; 2) federal unemployment benefits from the CARES Act are not extended beyond their July 31st expiration; and 3) a COVID-19 vaccine or treatment becomes available in 1H2021. Based on these assumptions, and the staffing firm data we have collected regarding 1H2020, we forecast a 17% decline in the US staffing industry this year, a modest upgrade from the 21% decline in our base case forecast from April. We project revenue growth in only two segments of the staffing industry this year: travel nurse (+5%) and life sciences (+3%). The temporary staffing segment seeing the most disruption is the industrial segment, which we forecast to decline 22% this year. We project a 14% decline in temporary staffing revenue this year, and a 36% decrease in the more cyclical place & search category (direct hire and retained search.)  As the US economy gradually recovers throughout 2021, we project 11% growth in temporary staffing revenue and 19% expansion in place & search. Based on additional data and analysis, we upgraded our 2019 growth estimate for healthcare staffing to 7%, from our 4% estimate published in April. This was driven by upgraded 2019 growth estimates for travel nurse (12% from 6%), per diem nurse (3% from 2%), and allied healthcare (8% from 4%). Summary tables of our US staffing industry market size and growth projections from 1995 to 2021P can be found on pages 9 to 12. To download the complete report, please select the following link:  US Staffing Industry Forecast 20200707 - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • Largest Direct Hire Firms Globally

    The global direct hire market accounted for $33.5 billion (€29.9 billion) in 2019, 6.7% of the global staffing market.  The Americas and Asia Pacific were the two largest regions for direct hire. The United States was the largest national market in 2019, with 40% of the global market. This report provides a ranking of the 30 largest providers of direct hire services globally, based on revenues generated in 2019. The largest global provider was Page Group, followed by The Adecco Group and Hays. Finally, we also provide an overview of the latest trends, based on data published by the largest publicly-listed providers in this space. We have ranked companies by revenue, according to industry custom, but this ranking should not be taken to imply that a firm with a higher rank provides better service or more value to its shareholders. The full top 30 ranking can be found on pages 7-8. Our definition of direct hire revenue and the methodology for this report can be found on page 9. Revenue figures above represent SIA’s best estimate based on available information at the time of publication. The accuracy of estimates may vary depending on multiple factors, including firms’ willingness to provide or confirm information about their operations. To download a full copy of this report, click below: Largest Direct Hire Firms Globally 20200702 - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • July US Jobs Report

    Event: In today’s generally favorable monthly jobs report from the US Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), total nonfarm employment rose by 4.8 million in June on a seasonally adjusted basis. This was the greatest monthly rise on record (going back to 1939), breaking the record set in May of 2.7 million (after a record loss of 20.8 million in April). Temporary help services also posted its largest gain on record (going back to 1990) of 149,000 jobs in June, two months after its record decline of 841,000 jobs. The temporary agency penetration rate rose from 1.58% in May to 1.63% in June, but still below its pre-COVID level of 1.9%. The national unemployment rate declined for the month, from 13.3% to 11.1%, even with a rise in the labor force.14 of the 15 major industry groups gained jobs for the month (the exception being natural resources/mining with a loss of 10,000 jobs. A majority of the 4.8 million total jobs gained came from just two categories: leisure & hospitality (+ 2.1 million) and retail trade (+ 740,000). Despite having the largest job gain for each of the last two months, leisure and hospitality still shows the steepest year-over-year (y/y) percentage decline (-27%). The second steepest is in temporary help (-24%). All of the fifteen major industry groups are down y/y, the closest to a complete rebound are financial activities (-1%) and construction (-4%).BLS Revisions: The change in total nonfarm payroll employment for May was revised from 2.5 million to 2.7 million. April was revised from -20.7 million to -20.8 million. With these revisions, total nonfarm employment change was 90,000 higher than previously reported. The change in temporary help services employment for May was unchanged; April was revised upward by 7,800 jobs.Staffing Industry Analysts’ Perspective: Despite a 6% rise over the last two months, total nonfarm employment stands 10% below its peak from February of this year. As long as recent rises in COVID-19 cases don’t force a return of shelter-in-place restrictions, we should continue to see recovery in the coming months. The number of unemployed persons on temporary layoff declined by 4.8 million (the reciprocal of job gains for the month), but 10.6 million remain, suggesting a large number of people returning to work in the coming months. However, the number of permanent job losers continued to rise, by 588,000 to 2.9 million in June. As businesses re-open after shelter-in-place regulations, we should continue to see substantial job increases, but some businesses will not re-open, or at least not to the same capacity. Thus, once we recover 60%-80% of the April losses, gains will likely come much slower as they may be driven more by new companies replacing old companies from the pre-COVID world, rather than by businesses re-opening. Temporary agency jobs will likely mirror this trend. Members may download our jobs report tool by selecting the link below:  Monthly Employment Situation July 2020 - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • Contingent Workforce Regulatory Environment in Italy

    Key Findings Temporary agency work was first regulated in Italy by Law 196 of 1997 but has seen significant growth in the past five years. While indefinite employment is still the norm in Italy, recent changes in the regulation of contingent labour have been driven by the need for flexibility in the labour market. This report gives an overview of the legal and regulatory environment for workforce solutions providers who supply or facilitate the supply and use of contingent labour; and for contingent workforce buyers who utilize temporary agency workers, independent contractors and statement of work providers in Italy. To download the full report, click below: Contingent Workforce Regulatory Environment in Italy 20200706 - You do not have permission to view this object. Legal Disclaimer: The information contained in this report is provided solely for the purposes of information and should not be considered legal advice. It is always recommended to seek the advice of qualified legal counsel before acting on any of the information contained in this report. […]

  • Largest Direct Hire Firms Globally

    The global direct hire market accounted for $33.5 billion (€29.9 billion) in 2019, 6.7% of the global staffing market.  The Americas and Asia Pacific were the two largest regions for direct hire. The United States was the largest national market in 2019, with 40% of the global market. This report provides a ranking of the 30 largest providers of direct hire services globally, based on revenues generated in 2019. The largest global provider was Page Group, followed by The Adecco Group and Hays. Finally, we also provide an overview of the latest trends, based on data published by the largest publicly-listed providers in this space. We have ranked companies by revenue, according to industry custom, but this ranking should not be taken to imply that a firm with a higher rank provides better service or more value to its shareholders. The full top 30 ranking can be found on pages 7-8. Our definition of direct hire revenue and the methodology for this report can be found on page 9. Revenue figures above represent SIA’s best estimate based on available information at the time of publication. The accuracy of estimates may vary depending on multiple factors, including firms’ willingness to provide or confirm information about their operations. To download a full copy of this report, click below: Largest Direct Hire Firms Globally 20200702 - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • EMEA Financial Results Q4 2019

    Revenue in the reported 36 publicly traded staffing firms in the EMEA region fell by a median of 5.4% during Q1 2020, compared to the same period in 2019. Among the companies included in this report, 22 reported a decrease in revenue. The Covid-19 outbreak negatively impacted the results of many staffing firms during Q1 2020. The subsequent lockdowns and restrictions led to many European countries entering a recession. While the majority of lockdown measures were enacted in March, first-quarter results for staffing firms were generally affected. The median gross margin fell slightly by 0.1% compared to last year. Median net income fell by -4.0%. Due to the varying nature of financial reporting styles across EMEA, some companies reported their revenue in only half years and other varying periods. Several firms had not yet announced their results for the period at the time of publication of this report. For more information about each company’s results, please click on the links provided or visit the companies’ websites. This report should be read in conjunction with the Coronavirus Playbook for UK Staffing Firms, which describes the cost reduction actions recently reported by publicly-held UK staffing firms. To download the full report, please click below: EMEA Financial Results Q1 2020 - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • IT Staffing Growth Assessment

    We estimate IT temporary staffing is a $70 billion global market. The Americas region represents half of the global market, while EMEA represents approximately one-third (33%). In terms of professional staffing mix by region, IT is most penetrated in the US (41%), compared to roughly one-third in both EMEA (33%) and APAC (35%). The impact of recession on IT employment has varied considerably in recent decades. For example, the recession of 2001, precipitated by the “dot-com bubble,” while rather mild for the overall economy, had a significant impact on IT employment. Conversely, the Great Recession of 2007–2009 hindered overall employment to a far greater degree than it did IT specifically. Again, IT is proving to be among the most resilient pockets of employment during the 2020 Covid-19 pandemic. The 11 sections of this 112 page report, as outlined in the table of contents below, explore dynamics in IT staffing and workforce solutions to inform industry stakeholders and support strategic planning initiatives. Table of contents:Introduction……………………………………………………………………….3Section 1: Shifting IT staffing demand drivers in a changed world.………..5Section 2: Target markets and skillsets………………………………………16Section 3: The war for talent persists in the face of disruption……............30Section 4: Market size and participants.……………………………..……….37Section 5: IT staffing industry verticals………………………………………..51Section 6: IT staffing mergers & acquisitions………………………………....60Section 7: Growth prospects and benchmarking data……………………….66Section 8: Gross margin trends………………………………………………...80Section 9: Evolving business models and the Human Cloud………………..86Section 10: IT staffing firms and statement-of-work engagements………....95Section 11: Navigating the new normal………………………………...……..105To download the complete report, please click the link below: IT Staffing Growth Assessment 20200624 - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • Largest Direct Hire Firms Globally

    The global direct hire market accounted for $33.5 billion (€29.9 billion) in 2019, 6.7% of the global staffing market.  The Americas and Asia Pacific were the two largest regions for direct hire. The United States was the largest national market in 2019, with 40% of the global market. This report provides a ranking of the 30 largest providers of direct hire services globally, based on revenues generated in 2019. The largest global provider was Page Group, followed by The Adecco Group and Hays. Finally, we also provide an overview of the latest trends, based on data published by the largest publicly-listed providers in this space. We have ranked companies by revenue, according to industry custom, but this ranking should not be taken to imply that a firm with a higher rank provides better service or more value to its shareholders. The full top 30 ranking can be found on pages 7-8. Our definition of direct hire revenue and the methodology for this report can be found on page 9. Revenue figures above represent SIA’s best estimate based on available information at the time of publication. The accuracy of estimates may vary depending on multiple factors, including firms’ willingness to provide or confirm information about their operations. To download a full copy of this report, click below: Largest Direct Hire Firms Globally 20200702 - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • IT Staffing Growth Assessment

    We estimate IT temporary staffing is a $70 billion global market. The Americas region represents half of the global market, while EMEA represents approximately one-third (33%). In terms of professional staffing mix by region, IT is most penetrated in the US (41%), compared to roughly one-third in both EMEA (33%) and APAC (35%). The impact of recession on IT employment has varied considerably in recent decades. For example, the recession of 2001, precipitated by the “dot-com bubble,” while rather mild for the overall economy, had a significant impact on IT employment. Conversely, the Great Recession of 2007–2009 hindered overall employment to a far greater degree than it did IT specifically. Again, IT is proving to be among the most resilient pockets of employment during the 2020 Covid-19 pandemic. The 11 sections of this 112 page report, as outlined in the table of contents below, explore dynamics in IT staffing and workforce solutions to inform industry stakeholders and support strategic planning initiatives. Table of contents:Introduction……………………………………………………………………….3Section 1: Shifting IT staffing demand drivers in a changed world.………..5Section 2: Target markets and skillsets………………………………………16Section 3: The war for talent persists in the face of disruption……............30Section 4: Market size and participants.……………………………..……….37Section 5: IT staffing industry verticals………………………………………..51Section 6: IT staffing mergers & acquisitions………………………………....60Section 7: Growth prospects and benchmarking data……………………….66Section 8: Gross margin trends………………………………………………...80Section 9: Evolving business models and the Human Cloud………………..86Section 10: IT staffing firms and statement-of-work engagements………....95Section 11: Navigating the new normal………………………………...……..105To download the complete report, please click the link below: IT Staffing Growth Assessment 20200624 - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • Most Attractive Staffing Segments in the UK

    We have split the UK staffing market between nine major occupational segments and analysed the relative merits of each segment. This report provides a framework to help staffing executives identify staffing segments that best fit their expansion strategy. The Marketing/Creative segment stands out as the most attractive overall, followed by Engineering and Healthcare. On the other hand, the least attractive occupational segments are Office/Clerical and Finance/Accounting, according to our analysis. However, the relative merits of each market and their strengths and weaknesses will likely differ depending on the reader’s own company culture and specific business case. With this in mind, we also provide a customisable tool, which allows for weighting of the ten sub-components used in this analysis to better suit the user’s specific requirements To download a full copy of the report, click below: Most Attractive Staffing Segments in the UK 20200624 - You do not have permission to view this object. To download a copy of the Sector Attractiveness Assessment Tool (SAAT), click below: Segment Attractiveness Assessment Tool 20200624 - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • The Global Gig Economy

    SIA estimates the global gig economy was worth USD 4.7 trillion in 2019. Within the broad definition of contingent/gig work, there are five principal categories:  Temporary agency workers (TAW) assigned through a staffing agency. Temporary employees sourced directly (no staffing agency). Independent contractors/self-employed with no employees. By far the largest category of contingent work responsible for 60% of the total. Statement of work (SOW) consultants employed by consulting firm.  Human cloud workers. In this insight, we present a global estimate divided by the 18 countries that represent approximately 90% of global TAW spend. The estimate for remaining nations is included under “Rest of World”. If your SIA membership covers the Americas region you should read this insight in conjunction with our US Gig Economy – 2020 report. To download the full report, please click below: The Global Gig Economy 20200613 APAC - You do not have permission to view this object. […]