Global Daily News

  • Online staffing platform Jitjatjo raises $11 million

    Online staffing platform Jitjatjo raised $11 million in Series A funding led by Morningside Technology Ventures. Mick Sawka of Morningside Technology Advisory LLC will join Jitjatjo’s board.Founded in 2016, New York-based Jitjatjo is an on-demand staffing platform that connects hospitality business with temporary workers.The company launched in 2016 with an initial focus on New York City’s hospitality sector; it entered the Chicago market about four months ago. The company says it has filled “tens of thousands of shift assignments to a talent pool of several thousand.”The company will use the new financing for growth of its New York and Chicago staffing networks; geographic expansion to other US cities; advancing Jitjatjo’s machine learning capabilities to support the launch of an enterprise technology offering; and the establishment of an experiential headquarters in New York.VentureBeat reports Jitjatjo’s customers include Acme, Cosme, Barclays Center, Columbia University, Zuma and others. […]

  • Economists raise 2019 job growth forecast but expect slowdown in 2020

    Economists raised their estimate for job gains this year but expect a slowdown in 2020, according to the first-quarter Survey of Professional Forecasters released today by the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.The projections for the annual average level of nonfarm payroll employment now suggest job gains at a monthly rate of 191,800 in 2019, up from the previous estimate of 181,900. However, the forecast calls for new jobs added monthly in 2020 to fall to 123,200.A slightly weaker outlook for the unemployment rate for the next few quarters accompanies a weaker outlook for near-term GDP growth.The jobless rate forecasts for the second and third quarters of this year both edged up to 3.7% from 3.6%, and the new report forecasts the 3.7% unemployment rate to remain through the first quarter of 2020 as well.The Survey of Professional Forecasters is based on a poll of 38 economists.Click on chart to enlarge. […]

  • Department of Labor publishes new overtime rule; comment period ends May 21

    The Office of the Federal Register on Thursday published the US Department of Labor’s Notice of Proposed Rulemaking that would make more employees who work in an “executive, administrative and professional” capacity eligible for overtime.The US Department of Labor’s Wage and Hour Division proposed the new rule earlier this month. It would make more than a million more American workers eligible for overtime under the Fair Labor Standards Act, according to the department.Under the new rule, workers making up to $679 per week, or $35,308 per year, would automatically be eligible for overtime if they work more than 40 hours per week. Above this salary level, eligibility for overtime varies based on job duties. The level under the present rule is up to $455 per week, or $23,660 per year.The new rule also raises the total annual compensation requirement for a worker to be considered a “highly compensated employee” and exempt from overtime. The new level would be $147,414 per year, up from $100,000 per year.The official publication in the Federal Register marks the start of the proposal’s public comment period. comments must be received by May 21 to be considered. Members of the public may submit comments about the proposed rule electronically at www.regulations.gov, in the rulemaking docket RIN 1235-AA20. […]

  • Four states tie for lowest unemployment rate in February at 2.4%

    Iowa, New Hampshire, North Dakota and Vermont tied for the lowest unemployment rate among all states in February at 2.4% each, according to seasonally adjusted data released today by the US Bureau of Labor Statistics. Hawaii followed at 2.7%.On the other hand, Alaska recorded the highest jobless rate among all states at 6.5% in February.Unemployment rates fell in February in four states: Kentucky, North Dakota, Vermont and Wyoming all posted 0.1 percentage-point decreases. […]

  • Collaboration in the Gig Economy Europe conference is next week

    The Collaboration in the Gig Economy conference is next week in London. The event brings together technology suppliers, HR executives, procurement executives and others to discuss the latest trends in the human cloud and explore strategies for improving the performance of the talent supply chain.Industry leaders will discuss culture, data, technology, automation, legal issues and more.Next week’s Collaboration in the Gig Economy conference features thought leaders from across the workforce solutions ecosystem, including SIA President Barry Asin’s “The Gig Economy: Where We’ve Been and Where We Are Going” session; and leading suppliers and market intermediaries will share insights on the challenges and solutions facing the ecosystem in a keynote panel “Connecting and Optimizing the Talent Supply Chain,” moderated by John Nurthen, SIA’s executive director of global research.Other sessions in the spotlight at this year’s Collaboration in the Gig Economy include the keynote “GigE Talks,” where industry peers share their perspectives, and the “Gig Economy Dragons’ Den,” where gig economy technology companies compete for the second-annual Gig Economy Dragons’ Den Innovation Award.“The second annual Collaboration in the Gig Economy taps the rapid evolution in the industry over the past year, informing, connecting and elevating the ecosystem and bringing together staffing companies, technology companies, enterprise professionals and related industry partners alike to explore the tremendous shifts in ideology, technology and work models that are taking hold and creating tremendous opportunity,” said Ursula Williams, COO at SIA.Staffing suppliers, hundreds of workforce solutions buyers; VMS, MSP and RPO providers; suppliers to staffing; gig economy/human cloud companies; and others interested in the workforce solutions ecosystem are expected to attend the conference next Wednesday and Thursday at the Royal Lancaster Hotel. […]

  • UK – NHS report proposes new measures including ramping up overseas recruitment to stop workforce crisis

    A radical expansion of nurse training as well as overseas recruitment and a tripling in the number of people training as postgraduates are among the urgent measures needed to prevent the health and care workforce crisis from worsening in the UK, according to a report from Nuffield Trust, The King’s Fund and the Health Foundation.The report calculated that the solutions can only be fully implemented if there is a £900 million increase in the annual budget for training and developing healthcare workers in England by 2023-2024.On nursing, the report concluded that, even with grants and expansion of postgraduate training, bringing 5,000 more students onto nursing courses each year and actions to stop nurses leaving the NHS, the gap cannot be entirely filled domestically by 2023-24.The authors of the report say that to keep services functioning, 5,000 nurses a year must therefore also be ethically recruited from abroad, meaning the government will need to make wide exceptions to new salary restrictions in the Immigration White Paper and fund the visa costs incurred by NHS trusts.Projections for the report show that without actions like these being embraced in the upcoming NHS workforce plan, GP shortages in England will almost triple to 7,000 and nurse shortages double to 70,000 by 2023-24.On social care, the authors say the proposed migration system after Brexit is not appropriate, and the government will need to come up with a special new route into the UK for care workers. It called on a comprehensive overhaul of social care funding to stop poor pay and conditions continuing to drive staff away.The report also calls for £250 million a year in additional funding for developing workforce skills, as part of the overall £900 million, so that staff can keep up with changing technology and illnesses.Furthermore, it called on the government to legislate immediately to create a regulated profession of physician associates, so that these skilled staff can take on more tasks and reduce the pressure on doctors across England.Other measures included were nationally backed initiatives to close gender and ethnic pay gaps in the NHS, a call on the NHS to become a better employer so that fewer people want to leave and NHS pay to keep rising in real terms and not return to cuts or fall behind pay in the rest of the economy.The report follows the three organisations’ analysis last year assessing the scale of the problem, which warned that staffing shortages could top 250,000 without urgent action. It also comes ahead of the Workforce Implementation Plan expected next month, which will lay out how NHS leaders aim to address these issues.Richard Murray, Chief Executive of the King’s Fund, said, “NHS workforce shortages are mirrored in social care where poor pay and conditions continue to drive away staff. Social care is heavily reliant on overseas recruitment, but the government’s post-Brexit migration proposals risk limiting this vital source of workers. The government should go back to the drawing board to devise a route for care workers to enter the UK and develop a more sustainable funding model for social care.”Michael Johnson-Ellis, Managing Director at Healthier Recruitment, responded to the report, “With nearly a third of qualified nursing, midwifery and health visiting staff expected to retire in the next 10 years, and the proportion of GPs who have taken voluntary early retirement doubling since 2011, boosting retention is our first line of defence against a future skills crisis.”“Overreliance on temporary workforces continues to have a negative impact on both the experiences of substantiate staff and continuity of care – and this is something which must be addressed aggressively,” Johnson-Ellis said. “Through proactively working to improve employee engagement, seeking permanent employees rather than relying on agency staff and deploying existing workforces in a more efficient way, Trusts can work to mitigate against the crisis situation that this report forecasts.”   &nbs […]

  • UK – Majority of business leaders fear their organisation will become irrelevant if it fails to shift to human-AI workforce: Capita

    Business leaders in the UK believe that the transition to a hybrid ‘human-AI’ workforce will be their biggest strategic challenge over the next five years. The majority of them, or 67%, fear that their organisation will become irrelevant if it fails to shift to this hybrid workforce, according to a survey from Capita People Solutions.The survey of more than 2,000 company staff found that 72% of business leaders see the ‘human-to-hybrid’ transition as their most important priority, while 93% acknowledge that they need to start proactively managing the shift to a hybrid workforce this year.Capita’s study defines ‘human to hybrid’ as ‘the new dynamic where humans will work in a fully digitised and technologically-optimised environment, and increasingly work alongside robots and AI, over the next ten years’.Meanwhile, 51% of employees report that they will choose to leave their organisation if it doesn’t manage the transition to a hybrid workforce well and continue to offer opportunities to progress.The biggest worry for workers is that working within a hybrid workforce will result in a lack of human interaction at work (46%). Other concerns include reduced opportunities to progress (26%) and the possibility of a less inclusive and diverse workforce (23%). However, most workers are positive about the prospect of working within a hybrid workforce, believing that it will provide increased opportunities to learn new skills (44%), greater flexibility (40%), and more interesting and varied work (32%).“Investing in AI and automation is not enough to build a sustainable or productive hybrid workforce; organisations also need to ensure they have the skills, cultures and processes in place to work alongside this technology,” Erika Bannerman, Executive Officer at Capita People Solutions, said. “It has to be a people-first approach, where innovative technology is used to support, enable and empower a highly-skilled, motivated and agile human workforce to deliver higher value work.&rdquo […]

  • Europe – Job vacancy rates rise for both euro area and EU28 in Q4

    The job vacancy rates in the euro area (EA19) stood at 2.3% in the fourth quarter of 2018, an increase from 2.0% from the same period in 2017. At the same time, In the EU28, the job vacancy rate was also 2.3% and also up from 2.0% the previous year, according to the latest data from Eurostat, the statistical office of the European Union.In the euro area, the job vacancy rate in the fourth quarter of 2018 was 2.0% in industry and construction, and 2.6% in services. In the EU28, the rate was 2.1% in industry and construction, and 2.6% in services.Among the member states for which comparable data are available, the highest job vacancy rates in the fourth quarter of 2018 were recorded in Czech Republic (6.0%), Belgium and Germany (both 3.4%) and Austria (3.1%).The lowest rates were observed in Greece (0.4%), Bulgaria, Ireland, Spain and Portugal (all 0.9%).Meanwhile, when compared with the same quarter of the previous year, the job vacancy rate in the fourth quarter of 2018 rose in twenty member states, remained stable in Belgium, Cyprus, Finland and Sweden, but fell in Estonia, Ireland, Croatia (all of them -0.1%) and Lithuania (-0.2%).The largest increase was registered in the Czech Republic (1.6%). […]

  • People – SG Recruitment, Cobalt Recruitment

    SG Recruitment, a UK-based international recruitment firm focusing primarily on the healthcare sector, announced that Steve Howson will step down as CEO on 31 March 2019 in order to pursue new opportunities outside of the company. Howson will retain close links with the company and will remain a Board member, returning to his previous role as a Non-Executive Director. The company has begun the process to appoint a successor. Until an appointment is made, David Sumner, the underlying majority shareholder and previous CEO of the company, will take on the role of Interim CEO with effect from 1 April 2019.UK-based recruitment firm Cobalt Recruitment announced Miles Hunt as the company’s first ever Chairman. Hunt has previously served as Chairman for the Association of Professional Staffing Companies (APSCo) and was Chief Executive at Empresaria Group. He also served as Chairman at Darwin Recruitment, Oasis HR, Benula Capital, and Barclay Simpson. Cobalt also announced that it has appointed Daniel Bauer as Managing Director of European Growth. Bauer is currently managing director for Cobalt in Austria as well as a senior executive director for Cobalt in Germany. […]

  • India – Supreme Court allows appeal against regularising casual workers for the Border Roads Organisation

    The Supreme Court set aside an Uttarakhand High Court judgment directing India’s government to regularise the services of several casual labourers working for the Border Roads Organisation which develops and maintains road networks in India's border areas and friendly neighboring countries.The regularisation of all casual paid workers would grant them benefits similar to regular employees.The Deccan Herald reports that the Supreme Court has now allowed an appeal by India’s government against the Uttarakhand High Court’s judgement to regularise the casual workers.A single-judge high court bench had, on a petition from the All India Trade Union Congress (AITUC), directed the government in March 2015 to regularise the workers.The AITUC had argued that the casual labourers had worked for a long time on a single Border Roads Organisation project in Uttarakhand relating to a pilgrimage, but were being deprived of the salaries, perks and other benefits due to regular government employees.The Court then directed the government to frame a scheme within three months to regularise all those who had worked for more than five years continuously with the Border Roads Organisation or the allied organisation, the General Reserve Engineering Forces. The court also ordered the government to pay them under the minimum pay scale for the corresponding pay scale of government employees, with all the benefits included.According to the Telegraph India, the Supreme Court ruled that a “high court cannot frame a scheme for the government or direct it to frame one but only ask it to ‘consider’ framing a particular scheme.”A bench of justices set aside the high court's decision passed on 5 December 5, 2016, and said it is the sole prerogative of the government to frame schemes and that courts should stay out of governance.“All the High Court, in exercise of its extraordinary power under Article 226 of the Constitution, can do is to direct the government to consider for framing an appropriate scheme,” Justice Abhay Manohar Sapre, who wrote the judgment for the Bench, said.India’s Supreme Court stated, “Casual employment terminates when the same is discontinued, and merely because a temporary or casual worker has been engaged beyond the period of his employment, he would not be entitled to be absorbed in regular service or made permanent.&rdquo […]

  • World – Closing gender pay gap could improve OECD GDP by $2 trillion, study finds

    Improving female participation in work across OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development) countries could boost the OECD GDP by USD 6 trillion, while closing the gender pay gap could boost GDP by USD 2 trillion, according to a new report from PwC.The report, ‘Women in Work Index’, also ranked the OECD countries that are making the most progress for women in work.The rankings take into consideration the gender pay gap, female boardroom representation as well as employment data.Iceland and Sweden retained their place as the top two performing OECD countries, with New Zealand occupying third place.The UK saw its ranking improve from 14th to 13th position on the Index. Within the UK, Wales has made the most significant progress since 2000, primarily because of improvements in its female labour force participation rate. The East Midlands region has experienced the greatest fall over the same period due to a decline in the female full-time employment rate.Since 2000, Luxembourg and Poland have made the largest improvements on the Index while Portugal, the United States and Austria have experienced the greatest fall in the rankings over this period.The report also found that since 2000, India and China have added 167 million people to the global workforce, including 26 million women who now account for 35% of the global female workforce.If included in the PwC index, China would place between the Slovak Republic (26th) and Japan (27th) and India would occupy the last position, below Korea.PwC added that China could increase its GDP by USD 497 billion by matching its female employment rate to that of the report’s benchmark country, Sweden, and could increase female earnings by USD 2 trillion by closing the gender pay gap.Meanwhile, India would see a USD 245 billion boost to female earnings from closing the gender pay gap and a USD 7 trillion increase in GDP from increasing the female employment rate to the level of Sweden. […]

  • Australia – Seasonally adjusted unemployment rate falls to 4.9% in February

    The seasonally-adjusted unemployment rate in Australia fell to 4.9% in February 2019, down 0.6% when compared to the same period the previous year, according to data from the Australian Bureau of Statistics.The 4.9% rate is the lowest since 2011.The data from ABS also showed that the number of unemployed persons in Australia in February stood at 664,300, this is down 9.5% compared to the previous year.ABC News said the decrease in unemployment was largely driven by fewer people looking for work. Australia’s seasonally adjusted labour force participation rate fell by 0.1% in February 2019 to 65.6%.At the same time, the number of employed persons stood at 12.76 million in February 2019, an increase of 2.3% when compared to the same period in 2018.Monthly hours worked in all jobs increased by 3.1 million hours to 1.76 billion hours in February. […]

  • Taiwan – Seasonally adjusted jobless rate down slightly in February

    Taiwan’s seasonally unemployment rate stood at 3.71% in February 2019, down 0.01% from the previous month, according to the latest manpower survey results from the Directorate-General Budget, Accounting and Statistics.Pan Ning-hsin, deputy director of the DGBAS census department, told Focus Taiwan that the seasonally adjusted figure shows that the local job market remained stable, although the pace of domestic economic growth showed signs of slowing.On a non-seasonally adjusted basis, the unemployment rate was up by 0.08% to 3.72%  in February 2019.The number of unemployed persons stood at 443,000 in February 2019, which increased by 9,000 (2.07%) and 5,000 (1.15%) from the previous month and that of the previous year, respectively.The DGBAS added that the number of those who lost their jobs due to termination of seasonal and temporary job contracts rose 2,000 from a month earlier, while the number of those who quit to look for other jobs also rose 4,000.Total employment in February 2019 was 11.47 million, which decreased by 12,000 (-0.10%) from the previous month; however, it increased by 76,000 (0.67%) from that of the previous year.The labour force participation rate was 59.07% in February 2019, which declined by 0.02% from the previous month; however, it rose by 0.19% from that of the previous year. […]

Latest Research

  • Staffing Firm Internal Staff Career Plans

    Key Findings: Internal staff respondents were asked: “Looking forward in your career, where do you hope you will ultimately end up?” Over 15,000 internal staff answered this question. Overwhelmingly, internal staff plan either to rise to management at their current company (42%) or to just get better at what they currently do (37%). However, that result varies a great deal by age. “Rising to management at my current company” was a career option that declined with every increasing age increment, from 50% among those 25 and under to 15% among those 56 and over. Conversely, “just getting better and better at what I currently do” was chosen by increasing percentages at every age increment, rising from 24% among those 25 and under to 66% among those 56 and over. Additionally, administrative assistants, area/division heads, and IT specialists were typically less likely to hope to rise in the management ranks and more likely to plan to “just get better and better at what I currently do.” Of the remaining responses, a slight 4% hope to rise to management somewhere in the staffing industry, 3% to manage a contingent worker program as part of HR or procurement, 2% to start their own staffing business, and 12% to do “something else.” To access the complete report, please select the link below: North America Internal Staff Survey Career Plans 20190322 - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • Staff Ideas On How To Improve Your Firm

    Key Findings: Internal staff respondents were asked the open-ended question: “If you were running the staffing firm you currently work for, what would you change?” Over 9,000 internal staff answered this question. Results from a randomized subset of these responses were analyzed to identify patterns, revealing nine areas of potential improvement: Better compensation/benefits--staff want more generous compensation as well as commission plans that are fair and incentivize optimally Changes to operational policies/tactics--these varied a great deal, but a common theme was a desire to clarify and simplify More organized and open communication--addressing deficiencies in inter-departmental communication was the top suggestion Recommended new hires--most commonly staff wanted IT support hires and help with mundane tasks Streamline operational structure--staff often thought company integration and efficiency could be improved More flexible work schedules/option to work at home--better work/life balance was a common theme Improve technology--employees often had a sense that their staffing firm didn’t have the latest and greatest technology Changes to employee metrics and reviews--some felt that they were not measured fairly or reviewed sufficiently More training/mentoring--many staff thought their firm needed more training and mentoring especially for new employees The report includes sample quotes from internal staff detailing their thoughts on these suggestions. Responses were edited for clarity and brevity. To access the complete report, please select the link below: North America Internal Staff Survey Internal staff ideas on how to improve your staffing firm 20190320 - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • SI Report Webinar - March 2019

    In this webinar topics covered include: Legal & regulatory developments Internal staff survey results – working from home, tasks workers want automated Automation and AI musings M&A in staffing Marketing/creative staffing market And of course the latest updates on the state of the economy, employment trends and developments in the US staffing industry.Download presentation slides 190312 SI Report Webinar Presentation Slides - You do not have permission to view this object. Select the play button to begin viewing. […]

  • How To Develop Internal Staff

    Key Findings: Internal staff respondents were asked the open-ended question: “In the past year, what has been the most important part of your professional development or professional growth?” Nearly 9,000 internal staff answered this question. Results from a randomized subset of these responses were analyzed to identify patterns, revealing six work experiences that were important to staff professional development: New responsibilities/job challenges Formal training/on the job learning Coaching from management Developing management skills/being a good manager Just doing the best in my job and seeing success Learning the staffing industry Additionally, internal staff respondents were asked: “What types of development opportunities would you like to see more of at your organization? About 700 internal staff answered this question. Results from a randomized subset revealed three suggested areas for improvement in development opportunities: Clearer career paths/opportunities to move up More training More team building/group outings Sample quotes from internal staff detailing their thoughts on these suggestions are also provided in this report. To access the complete report, please select the link below: North America Internal Staff Survey Development Opportunities 20190315 - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • The Namibian Market

    Economy and EmploymentNamibia enjoys one of the most stable, peaceful political environments in Africa. The economy is mostly export driven. Mining, tourism, fishing and agriculture are Namibia’s key industries. The World Bank ranked Namibia 106 among 190 countries in its 2018 Doing Business Report.After experiencing negative growth over the last ten quarters, the Namibian economy is expected to recover in 2019, according to the Bank of Namibia. They are expecting a positive growth rate of 1.5% in 2019 following a contraction of 0.2% in 2018. This recovery is not certain, however, and is dependent on the country's trading partners including China and France, and international commodity prices, particularly for uranium.The country has a population of 2.4 million, but with the port of Walvis Bay under expansion, the country is positioning itself as a gateway to the more than 240 million people in the broader southern Africa market.The labour force in 2016 (the most recent numbers available from the government) was slightly over 1 million. This included 677,000 individuals in employment and 349,000 unemployed. The 2018 Labour Force Survey is not yet available, but it is estimated that with the latest closures and retrenchments, unemployment is now above 40%.There is a shortage of specialised skilled labour in Namibia. Employers often cite labour productivity and the shortage of skilled labour as the biggest obstacles to business growth. To combat this during 2018, the Namibian Training Authority (NTA) together with the Namibian Employers' Federation (NEF) and the Global Apprentices Network (GAN) Namibia have established a formal apprenticeship programme. During 2018, approximately. 21 companies enrolled 300 first year apprentices on three- year programmes. The 2019 intake will shortly commence, and the NEF are hoping to enrol 500 or more. Labour Broking and the LawSince the 1990s labour hire had increased rapidly in Namibia, without being regulated, according to the Supreme Court in Namibia: “The expression "labour hire" is loaded with substantive and emotive content extending well beyond its ordinary meaning. Considered in its historical context, it evokes powerful and painful memories of the abusive "contract labour system" which was part of the obnoxious practices inspired by policies of racial discrimination”.The problem with the system according to the NEF is that had it allowed unscrupulous employers to abdicate from giving the workers their normal employment rights. Many employees did not know who their employer was. It was these ‘fly-by-nights’ who damaged the reputation of Labour Broking, to the detriment of the established law-abiding companies.The 2007 Labor Act, which entered into force in November 2008, contained a provision that prohibited the hiring of temporary or contract workers (“labour hire”). At the time according to the Namibia Employers Federation (NEF), about 16,000 persons worked for the approximately twelve agencies. Africa Personnel Services was the largest. However, the provision was ruled unconstitutional by the Supreme Court (Africa Personnel Services v Government of the Republic of Namibia).Following from the decision of the Supreme Court, the Cabinet found itself in a stark position, that is to ban or impose strict regulation. It did the later in the Labor Amendment Act of 2012, under which temporary workers must generally receive equal compensation and benefits as non-temporary workers.Section 24 of the 2012 Act stipulates that a “private employment agency may not charge a fee directly or indirectly to any individual using its services” to be placed with a company in order to obtain work. Neither may a company withhold money form the salary of placed persons equalling the placement fee or parts of the fee.Under Section 128 a user company may from now on not employ people “placed by a private employment agency during a strike” or when permanent staff is contemplating a strike or a lockout. Additionally, no people may be employed via such an agency within six months after a user company has dismissed permanent employees “performing the same or similar work or work of equal value.”Section 128A of the 2012 amendments also gives clear conditions when a person is presumed to be employed.Another amendment (128C) stipulates that an “employee is presumed to be employed indefinitely, unless the employer can establish a justification for employment on a fixed term”.The amended law further specifies that a person placed to work for a user company also has the right to join a trade union and to bargain collectively with his or her employer.Fixed Term or temporary employment refers to the employment of employees for a fixed period – i.e. the employee knows that the employment period has a fixed start and end date or is linked to the completion of a well-defined assignment. It is recommended to have a clear agreement with the temporary employee in this regard to avoid any disputes.Remember that the temporary employee enjoys the same rights under the Labour Act as full time / permanent employees. Temporary employees, therefore, need to be registered, among other things, with the Social Security Commission, have the same leave benefits, etc. Regulating Private Employment AgenciesSeparately in 2011, the government introduced the Employment Services Act, which introduced the licencing of Private employment agencies. Under this law a “private employment agency” means any natural or juristic person, except the State, which provides one or more of the following labour market services (a) services for matching offers of and applications for employment, without the private employment agency becoming a party to the employment relationship which may arise therefrom; (b) services consisting of engaging individuals with a view to placing them to work for an employer, which assigns their tasks and supervises the execution of those tasks; or (c) other services relating to job-seeking that do not set out to match specific offers of and applications for employment, such as providing of information The Employment Services Bureau established under the Employment Service Act is responsible for their licensing as well as enforcement of the law. Currently, the Bureau has registered 44 private employment agencies licensed to operate. Although not all of these companies act strictly as an Employment Agency as it is generally understood.The Employment Services Act also introduced the Labour Market Information System where all relevant employers must report all vacancies. The bureau has a database of job seekers, and after evaluation of the job description selected candidates are referred to the potential employer. The NEF has received conflicting reports on the effectiveness of the system. Expert CommentarySpeaking to AllAfrica last year, Robert de Villiers, Managing Director of Africa Personnel Services (APS), said the labour brokerage industry employed about 4,000 people, with APS accounting for 3,600 of employees. He said APS workers received all statutory benefits, including social security.De Villiers does not believe that contract labour was on the rise in Namibia, saying from experience the need for labour-hire workers remained the “same over the years”. “There are certain industries with seasonal demands that require the service of a labour-hire broker,” he remarked.The APS boss noted that since 2013, when a recognition agreement with unions was signed, the gap between contract and ordinary employees became “insignificant”. “The law also requires same pay for work of equal value so that one is not more advantaged than the other,” he said, adding that the minimum rate payable to a labour-hire employee was N$10 per hour.More recently Tim Parkhouse of the NEF agreed with Robert de Villiers and stated that: there is no increase in the casualisation of the Namibian Labour Force. He believes “there is still and always will be the need for flexibility in employment, so if Labour Broking is not used, employers turn to time-bound contracts. There is nothing wrong with that as long as the employee understands the terms and conditions”.To download a list of all licenced employment agencies in Namibia, please click below: Namibia Company List - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • European Employment Barometer

                 SIA is delighted to provide this interactive research tool in collaboration with the World Employment Confederation. Our European Employment Barometer provides users with the capability to interactively drill through various levels of data – filter, sort, and download.This tool provides an overview of key labour market indicators relevant to the staffing, recruitment and workforce solutions industry in Europe. The dashboard shows labour quarterly market trends in 33 different countries, from Q2 2016 until the latest data release. Data Sources and AnalysesData collated from Eurostat’s most recent labour market survey findings on Total Employment provide us with insights into various areas such as: Y/Y change in total employment Part-time workers as a percentage of total employment Employment rate Unemployment-to-employment transition We review Temporary Employment metrics by looking at the number of temporary employees per country and compared to a European average. Other areas we focus on are: Temporary employees as a percentage of total employees Temporary employees by length of contracts Temporary employees by education Temporary employees by occupation, and Temporary employees by economic activity The data in the Agency Work tab is provided directly by European staffing associations as part of our partnership with the World Employment Confederation. This data shows business trends in the temporary agency work sector in 12 countries, from Q2 2016 to the latest data release. We also provide a unique set of correlations between temporary agency work indicators and other economic factors to illustrate the impact, or not, of wider economic trends on temporary agency work.European Employment Barometer Interactive Too […]

  • UK Professional Recruitment Trends Jan/Feb 2019

    Placements growth—perm placements up in IT and Engineering, while flexible placements up in Social work and Finance. Vacancies trends—perm vacancies up in Social work and Engineering and flexible vacancies up in Finance and IT. Salaries for January increased in five major industries–Social Care, Financial services, Engineering, Marketing and IT. To download a copy of the report, please click on the link below: ProRecruitmentTrends_January_February_2019 - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • Most Attractive Staffing Markets Globally

    This report provides comparative insights over 60 different staffing markets assessed across six Continents. We analysed their merits and how the attractiveness of each of these markets has changed when compared to our last analysis published in 2018. This global analysis is also broken down by region: Americas, Europe, Middle East and Africa, Asia-Pacific. Ireland stands out by some way as the most attractive market globally, according to our analysis, regaining the top position from Italy, last year’s lead. The Irish market’s most attractive traits are highlighted in this report. Our 2019 analysis shows market attractiveness scores increased in 15 markets. But, as a whole, the markets highlighted in this report are become less attractive: a total of 30 markets saw their score decline, when compared to our 2018 ranking. Compared to our 2018 analysis, the most improved markets are China and Japan The least attractive markets in our analysis are Nigeria, Algeria, Venezuela and Saudi Arabia. To download a copy of the full report, click below: Most Attractive Staffing Markets 20190306 - You do not have permission to view this object. To download the interactive Market Attractiveness Assessment Tool (MAAT), click below: Market Attractiveness Assessment Tool 20190306 - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • Japan Market Snapshot

    Our Market Snapshots provide an executive summary of the international staffing markets in EMEA and APAC.  They can be used as a barometer to assess the relative business environment within each market and are designed to help you whether you are a buyer or supplier of contingent labour; looking to move into a new market place or need to understand the different national factors you will encounter in managing your workforce internationally. Japan Market Snapshot - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • China Market Snapshot

    Our Market Snapshots provide an executive summary of the international staffing markets in EMEA and APAC.  They can be used as a barometer to assess the relative business environment within each market and are designed to help you whether you are a buyer or supplier of contingent labour; looking to move into a new market place or need to understand the different national factors you will encounter in managing your workforce internationally. To download the full report, click below: China Market Snapshot - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • European Employment Barometer

                 SIA is delighted to provide this interactive research tool in collaboration with the World Employment Confederation. Our European Employment Barometer provides users with the capability to interactively drill through various levels of data – filter, sort, and download.This tool provides an overview of key labour market indicators relevant to the staffing, recruitment and workforce solutions industry in Europe. The dashboard shows labour quarterly market trends in 33 different countries, from Q2 2016 until the latest data release. Data Sources and AnalysesData collated from Eurostat’s most recent labour market survey findings on Total Employment provide us with insights into various areas such as: Y/Y change in total employment Part-time workers as a percentage of total employment Employment rate Unemployment-to-employment transition We review Temporary Employment metrics by looking at the number of temporary employees per country and compared to a European average. Other areas we focus on are: Temporary employees as a percentage of total employees Temporary employees by length of contracts Temporary employees by education Temporary employees by occupation, and Temporary employees by economic activity The data in the Agency Work tab is provided directly by European staffing associations as part of our partnership with the World Employment Confederation. This data shows business trends in the temporary agency work sector in 12 countries, from Q2 2016 to the latest data release. We also provide a unique set of correlations between temporary agency work indicators and other economic factors to illustrate the impact, or not, of wider economic trends on temporary agency work.European Employment Barometer Interactive Too […]

  • Most Attractive Staffing Markets Globally

    This report provides comparative insights over 60 different staffing markets assessed across six Continents. We analysed their merits and how the attractiveness of each of these markets has changed when compared to our last analysis published in 2018. This global analysis is also broken down by region: Americas, Europe, Middle East and Africa, Asia-Pacific. Ireland stands out by some way as the most attractive market globally, according to our analysis, regaining the top position from Italy, last year’s lead. The Irish market’s most attractive traits are highlighted in this report. Our 2019 analysis shows market attractiveness scores increased in 15 markets. But, as a whole, the markets highlighted in this report are become less attractive: a total of 30 markets saw their score decline, when compared to our 2018 ranking. Compared to our 2018 analysis, the most improved markets are China and Japan The least attractive markets in our analysis are Nigeria, Algeria, Venezuela and Saudi Arabia. To download a copy of the full report, click below: Most Attractive Staffing Markets 20190306 - You do not have permission to view this object. To download the interactive Market Attractiveness Assessment Tool (MAAT), click below: Market Attractiveness Assessment Tool 20190306 - You do not have permission to view this object. […]