Global Daily News

  • Largest US healthcare staffing firms list includes 49 firms, $12.7 billion in revenue: SIA

    A total of 49 staffing firms generated at least $50 million each in US healthcare staffing revenue in 2018, according to Staffing Industry Analysts' estimates in its report, “Largest Healthcare Staffing Firms in the US: 2019 Update.” Combined, these firms generated $12.7 billion in such revenue and comprised 75% of the market.AMN Healthcare Services Inc. (NYSE: AHS) retained its place as the largest healthcare staffing firm in the US, followed by CHG Healthcare. Jackson Healthcare moved into the third spot following its acquisition of Avant Healthcare in the fourth quarter of 2017.Medical Solutions also moved into the top-five with revenue from its 2018 acquisition of PPR. The firm has also announced plans to acquire C&A Industries.AMN’s revenue does not include revenue from its acquisition of Advanced Medical Personnel Services in the second quarter of this year.The five largest healthcare staffing firms in the US and their estimated 2018 staffing revenue are: AMN Healthcare: $2.00 billion, 12% market share CHG Healthcare Services: $1.66 billion, 10% market share Jackson Healthcare: $1.00 billion, 6% market share Cross Country Healthcare: $807 million, 5% market share Medical Solutions: $506 million, 3% market share Five companies qualified for this year’s ranking that did not appear in last year’s list: AB Staffing Solutions, GrapeTree Medical Staffing, MAS Medical Staffing, MedPro Healthcare Staffing and OneStaff Medical.The report also provides four rankings of the largest firms in each healthcare subsegment: travel nurse, per diem nurse, locum tenens and allied healthcare.By sub-segment, AMN Healthcare also ranked as the largest travel nurse firm and the largest allied healthcare staffing firm.CHG Healthcare Services ranked as the largest locum tenens firm in the US, holding 37% market share in locum tenens by SIA estimates.HealthTrust Workforce Solutions ranked as the largest per diem nursing firm with $250 million in estimated 2018 US per diem nurse temporary staffing revenue, a 7% market share; Cross Country Healthcare also held 7% market share with $242 million in such revenue.Staffing Industry Analysts ranked companies by revenue, according to industry custom, but this ranking should not be taken to imply that a firm with a higher rank provides better service or more value to its shareholders.SIA corporate members can download the full report online. […]

  • Employees mostly agree that age diversity can strengthen workplaces, but 45% say policies favor millennials

    Despite media reports to the contrary, more than 90% of employees are satisfied with the diversity of age ranges in their workplace, according to a study released today by professional services firm Addison Group. Respondents agree that different ages in the workplace bring a variety of strengths within each generation.The report, titled “Age Is Just a Number: The Truth Behind Generational Stereotypes at Work,” found 86% of employees agreed that their colleagues within their age ranges are respected in the workplace. Further, 79% of respondents reported that they would take a job at a company where the makeup skewed older than them, and 75% would take a job at a company with a younger makeup.While many companies offer trendy perks to appeal to what they think young talent wants, the research found all generations generally want the same things: good pay, work-life balance, and enjoying the work they do. While trendy perks can elevate your work culture, the essentials bring in top talent, according to the report.“If employers invest in generous compensation, a healthy work culture and an engaging work experience, they reap the payoff across all demographics of their workforce,” it stated.However, 35% of respondents reported feeling that their workplace’s culture and processes favor one generation over others, with 45% reporting that it is mostly skewed toward millennials. Still, respondents agree that different ages in the workplace brings a variety of strengths within each generation“The age range of the current employment landscape is diverse as ever,” said Addison Group CEO Tom Moran. “With baby boomers working later in life and Gen Z just entering the workforce, the four generations are being forced to work in one shared environment for the first time ever. One might think that differences in work styles may clash, but the key to a harmonious workplace is understanding how each generation works together — their strengths, weaknesses and everything in between — and this report highlights just that.”Addison Group surveyed 1,000 full and part-time employees in May 2019. […]

  • Uber Freight gains share of trucking industry, invests $200 million in Chicago (PYMNTS)

    Human cloud firm Uber Technologies Inc. (NYSE: UBER) might finally turn a profit — but through its trucking division, not its rideshare program, PYMNTS reports. The trucking industry generated $796 billion in revenue last year, while the global ride-hailing market was valued at just $36 billion in 2017. And since its launch in 2017, Uber Freight now has a team of hundreds, with offices in San Francisco, Chicago and Amsterdam. The freight division also announced that it is investing $200 million to “put down roots” in Chicago. […]

  • Temporary workers at issue in UAW strike (Time)

    The United Auto Workers union is leading its first strike against General Motors in 12 years, digging in for a fight over jobs and benefits that could cost the carmaker about $50 million a day in earnings before interest and taxes due to lost production, Time reports. The union said GM’s most recent proposal fell short in key areas including use of temporary workers, healthcare and the length of time it takes for shorter-tenured members to get to top-scale pay.Temporary employees and those working their way up the pay scale are doing the same work for less compensation, said Ted Krumm, the head of the union’s bargaining committee. “We are fighting for the future of the middle class,” he said. […]

  • Ceridian acquires Australia-based enterprise workforce management solutions provider

    Ceridian, a US-based human capital management technology company, acquired Riteq, an Australia-based provider of enterprise workforce management solutions. The deal accelerates Ceridian’s momentum in the Australian and New Zealand markets.The acquisition, which closed Sept. 13, was completed pursuant to a share purchase agreement entered into with the shareholders of Lusworth Pty Limited, the parent company of Riteq. Financial terms of the transaction were not disclosed.Ceridian’s flagship cloud HCM platform is Dayforce, which provides human resources, payroll, benefits, workforce management and talent management functionality.Founded in 2001, Riteq has operations in Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane, Perth, New Zealand, and the UK.“Australia and New Zealand are highly attractive markets, and we believe the acquisition of Riteq, combined with Dayforce Payroll in Australia, truly positions Ceridian as a leading HCM provider in the region,” said Ceridian Chairman and CEO David Ossip.In 2016, Belgian HR service provider SD Worx acquired Ceridian UK and Ceridian Ireland in a full share acquisition. […]

  • Scotland – Permanent staff appointments down in August, but temp billings show growth

    Permanent staff appointments in Scotland fell for the second consecutive month during August, marking consecutive monthly falls for the first time in over two-and-a-half years, according to the latest Royal Bank of Scotland Report on Jobs.The Report on Jobs uses data from a panel of 100 recruitment agencies in Scotland, including members of the Recruitment and Employment Confederation, which published its Report on Jobs for the entire UK earlier this month.RBS said the rate of decline for permanent staff appointments was modest overall and weaker than seen for the UK as a whole.There were signs that firms were turning to short-term staff to fulfil jobs, as temporary billings rose at the fastest rate in five months. Overall, the rise was strong with temp billing growth in Scotland markedly outperforming that for the UK as a whole.Permanent vacancy growth in Scotland eased during August for the fifth consecutive month, registering the weakest expansion in over three-and-a-half years. The slowdown in Scotland was mirrored at the UK level, albeit with Scotland reporting stronger growth.Weaker growth in demand for permanent staff was in contrast to temporary vacancies, which increased at the fastest pace for ten months. Trends between Scotland and the UK as a whole diverged, however, with the latter observing the softest rise in temporary job openings since September 2009.The RBS also reported sustained pay pressures across Scotland during August. Starting salaries awarded to permanent new joiners rose solidly overall. Meanwhile permanent salary inflation was the slowest since January 2017. Temporary pay rates in Scotland increased at a faster rate in August. The rise was robust overall, and above the series average. As has been the case since March 2012, permanent candidate availability in Scotland continued to decline in August. The supply of temporary candidates also fell, although the rate of decline eased from July. In both cases, the supply of candidates in Scotland fell more quickly than across the UK as a whole. Sebastian Burnside, Chief Economist at Royal Bank of Scotland, commented, “Latest survey data reported a decline in permanent placements for the second month in a row, with the fall accelerating from July. Alongside easing demand for permanent staff, this indicates a softening of the Scottish labour market, albeit only moderate, and softer than across the UK as a whole.”“Moreover, data also appeared to highlight firms’ preference towards temporary staff over permanent employees, as slower permanent vacancy growth contrasted with strong demand for temporary workers. In addition, temporary billings continued to rise with Scotland markedly outperforming the UK as a whole,” Burnside said.REC data for the whole of the UK for August showed that recruitment activity was hampered by heightened political and economical uncertainty as ermanent placements fell in August at the quickest rate for over three years. […]

  • UK – 1 in 20 workers denied holiday pay, analysis finds

    Approximately one in twenty workers in the UK report not receiving any holiday entitlement, according to new analysis published today by think-tank Resolution Foundation.The analysis also showed that approximately one in ten workers do not receive a payslip.Workers in the UK are legally entitled to at least 28 days a year (pro-rated accordingly for part-time workers). The Foundation added that not receiving a payslip makes it hard for workers to calculate whether they’re receiving the right level of pay, pension and holiday entitlement and check for deductions.The research found that workers in small firms (employing fewer than 25 employees) are most likely to miss out on pay slips and holiday leave, as are workers on zero-hours and temporary contracts.The analysis was published to mark the start of the Resolution Foundation’s three-year investigation into labour market enforcement and is supported by grant-making foundation the Unbound Philanthropy. It aims to uncover the extent of unlawful working practises across the UK, and identifies where abuse is most common.The analysis also showed that HMRC identified a record 200,000 cases of workers not receiving the minimum wage as a result of its enforcement work last year, with the Foundation’s analysis finding that at least a quarter of those earning within 5p of the minimum wage are paid less than the legal minimum.The Foundation’s analysis shows that the likelihood of a worker being subject to labour market violations is closely connected to their personal characteristics, their type of employment contract, the firm they work for, and the industry they work in.Workers aged under 25 and over 65 are the most likely not to receive a payslip, according to the research.Around one in six workers aged 65+ report they have no paid holiday entitlement, more than any other age group, while workers aged 25 and under are almost twice as likely be underpaid the minimum wage as any other age group.Workers in the hotels and restaurants sector are the most likely to miss out on minimum legal workplace entitlements. Around one in seven workers in the sector report receiving no holiday entitlement, three times the rate across the rest of the economy, while around one in seven do not receive a pay slip (a rate 50% higher than the rest of the labour market).“The government has taken welcome steps to increase both the resources and powers of bodies such as HMRC and the GLAA (Gangmasters and Labour Abuse Agency) in recent years,” the Foundation stated. “However, the UK still largely relies on individuals to hold non-compliant firms to account, with the Employment Tribunal system receiving over 100,000 applications last year.”The Foundation says however that those workers who are most likely to require redress through the Tribunal system are the least likely to use it. It notes that young people are disproportionately likely to be subject to unlawful working practises, but make far fewer applications than any other age group. In contrast, managers are the least likely to be subject to labour market violations, but are among the most likely to make tribunal claims.The research comes as Labour party leader Jeremy Corbyn last week pledged to introduce the biggest ever extension to workers’ rights and create a ministry for employment rights and a workers’ protection agency if he secures a Labour majority.Lindsay Judge, senior economic analyst at the Resolution Foundation, commented, “The UK has a multitude of rules to govern its labour market – from maximum hours to minimum pay. But these rules can only become a reality if they are properly enforced. The government’s welcome proposal to create a new single enforcement agency should leave it better placed to tackle these labour market violations than the multiple bodies currently operating, as long as it’s properly empowered and resourced.”“Our analysis suggests that while violations take place across the labour market, the government should also prioritise investigations into sectors like hotels and restaurants, along with firms who make large use of atypical employment contracts, as that’s where abuse is most prevalent,” Judge said. […]

  • UK – Majority of workers do not expect their job to be eliminated by technology, study finds

    Most, or 80%, of UK workers said they do not expect their job to be eliminated within the next five years as a result of new technology, according to research from Gallup.Gallup’s data also found that 67% of UK employees feel that demand for their work will increase in the next three years due to technological changes.While a third of respondents strongly agree employers were ready to implement new technologies, over half, or 51%, in the UK feel that their employers do not help them broaden their skill set to make use of new digital technologies.According to the research, the feeling of being unprepared is driven by a lack of training. About one-third, or 36%, of UK employees, who strongly agree that they need training to build on their skills or learn new ones, say they did not participate in training in 2018. Approximately 60% of UK employees feel they need to develop their current skills and 57% need to develop new skills.Meanwhile, Gallup also found that 51% of UK workers expect better training to prepare them for a digital future.“How to navigate the changing workforce needs at a time of rapid digital disruption across many industries is a challenge facing employers everywhere,” Ghassan Khoury, Gallup EMEA Managing Partner, said. ‘’In an era of technological change, most employees are optimistic about the effects those changes will have on their work lives. This research shows that there is a keen workforce looking to upskill and improve, however, many are not given the opportunity to build on their current skills or to learn new skills due to a lack of training and development by employers.&rdquo […]

  • Russia – Government to discuss a 4-day workweek (Urdupoint)

    The Russian Trilateral Commission on the Regulation of Social and Labor Relations, which represents the government, employers and employees, will continue to discuss a potential transition to a four-day work week, reports Urdupoint, citing an announcement made by Russian Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev on Friday. Medvedev held a meeting with Chairman of the Federation of Independent Trade Unions of Russia Mikhail Shmakov, during which the prime minister suggested discussing the idea of a four-day work week. Shmakov said the Commission would establish a working group for this initiative. Shmakov agreed that the labor law should be more flexible, but noted that it should also protect the interests of the employee. He added that although new technologies reduce the amount of human labour, people should still receive at least the same amount of pay that they would for a five-day work week. Russia’s lower house will soon discuss the proposals for switching to a four-day workweek and prepare draft laws accordingly, based on discussions with the government, trade unions and employers. […]

  • Australia – Ceridian acquires workforce management solutions firm Riteq

    US-based Ceridian, a human capital management technology company, announced that it has completed the acquisition of Riteq, an Australia-based provider of enterprise workforce management solutions.The acquisition was previously announced on 5 September 2019 and closed and became effective last Friday. The acquisition was completed pursuant to a share purchase agreement entered into with the shareholders of Lusworth Pty Limited, the parent company of Riteq.Financial details of the transaction were not disclosed.Founded in 2001, Riteq has operations in Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane, Perth, New Zealand, and the UK. The company develops workforce management software designed to assist medium to large organisations leverage their workforce.Ceridian is a global human capital management software company. Dayforce, the company’s flagship cloud human capital management platform, provides human resources, payroll, benefits, workforce management, and talent management functionality.David Ossip, Chairman and CEO, Ceridian, commented, “Australia and New Zealand are highly attractive markets, and we believe the acquisition of R, combined with Dayforce Payroll in Australia, truly positions Ceridian as a leading human capital management provider in the region.”In 2016, Belgian HR service provider SD Worx acquired Ceridian UK and Ceridian Ireland in a full share acquisition. […]

  • Japan – Nisso Corporation enters joint venture with Nikon’s dispatch worker subsidiary

    Nisso Corporation, a Japanese human resources firm providing staffing services, announced that it has signed contracts regarding a collaboration on dispatch workers (term for temporary staffing) with electronics and camera giant Nikon’s subsidiary Nikon Staff Service Corporation (NSS).In January 2020, Nikon will transfer 49% of Nikon-owned NSS shares to Nisso, and NSS will become a joint venture company. The joint venture company will operate the worker dispatching undertaking previously operated by NSS.Nikon said that its contract manufacturing business which is presently operated by NSS will be operated by a newly established subsidiary of Nikon, Nikon Product Support Corporation, and will conduct business within Nikon group.The joint venture will be known as Nikon Nisso Prime Corporation.“As the labour force has been decreasing in tandem with the declining birthrate and aging population, it is anticipated that the demand for older workers and the demand for diversified employment formats will further increase,” Nikon and Nisso said in a joint statement.“NSS has provided excellent worker dispatching service mainly to Nikon group up until now,” the companies said in a statement. “Through the collaboration with Nisso, specifically by merging Nisso’s abundant experience, network and know-how about human resource development to the joint venture, Nikon Nisso Prime Corporation will further enhance the worker dispatching undertaking, promote the expanding and the securing of job opportunities for older employees of Nikon group.”No financial details of the transaction were disclosed. […]

  • Australia – Union takes Uber to court over unfair dismissal claim (Business Insider)

    Australia’s Transport Workers Union is taking Uber to court following a food delivery driver’s unfair dismissal case, reports Business Insider, citing a report from The Australian. The Union is appealing a decision by the Fair Work Commission which rejected an unfair dismissal claim by sacked Uber Eats driver Amita Gupta. In a tweet, the Union said, ‘the Federal Government doesn’t seem to care and we won’t stand by and let the abuse of workers continue.’ In the initial case, Gupta was a registered Uber Eats delivery driver who was assisted by her husband. She said she and her husband completed more than 2,200 deliveries between September 2017 and January 2019 before she was let go on 15 January 2019. The case states that the pair alleged they were at one point paid AUD 300 for 96 hours of logged work and when Amita was ten minutes late with a delivery, she was cut off from accessing the phone app entirely. After Amita lodged an unfair dismissal claim with the Fair Work Commission, Uber responded by saying she had no actual relationship with Uber Australia and was not an employee. The Court agreed with Uber and ruled that because she was not an employee then was not protected from unfair dismissal. The Union’s national secretary Michael Kaine said that Uber drivers don’t have control over their work as one would expect of a contractor sole trader in other circumstances. […]

  • India – Increase in IT flexi-staff hiring could lead to rising costs for companies (LiveMint)

    A move toward project-based work is prompting India-based IT services companies to adopt the flexi-staff model while hiring professionals in high-tech areas, spelling rising costs for companies, reports LiveMint. Clients are increasingly moving to project-based work instead of long-term contracts, wherever possible, however this also impacts the margins in the short-term due to the higher costs. Pankaj Khanna, VP of talent acquisition at IT consulting firm Mindtree, said the advantage of flexi hiring is that demand can be fulfilled faster and said that for short-term requirements, “it makes business sense to leverage the subcontracting/flexi hiring models without increasing the headcount.” However, subcontractors are said to be typically 15-20% more expensive with costs rising due to skills shortages and others costs such as visas. […]

Latest Research

  • Highest-Return Recruiting Tactics

    Key Findings: Temporary worker recruiting tactics. Staffing firms reported the temporary worker recruiting tactic with the highest bang-to-buck return on spend/effort to be recruiting from their existing candidate databases (44% reported it among top two tactics). A significant portion of respondents also selected: LinkedIn, other online job listings, and referral bonuses. Direct hire recruiting tactics. Staffing firms reported the direct hire recruiting tactic with the highest bang-to-buck return on spend/effort to be Linkedin (57% reported it among top two tactics). A significant portion of respondents also selected: recruit from existing candidate list, other online job listings, and referral bonuses. Changes since 2013. Comparisons between the current survey results and those of a similar survey in 2013 are slightly obscured by a change in the wording of the question, from (single) “top tactic” in 2013 to “top two tactics” in 2019. Nonetheless a change in relative values for one recruiting tactics was apparent. In 2013, referral bonuses were cited by just 7% as a top temp recruiting tactic and by just 3% as a top direct hire recruiting tactic. In 2019, referral bonuses were cited as among “top two tactics” by 32% for temp recruiting and by 22% for direct hire recruiting. To access the complete report, please select the link below: North America Staffing Company Survey 2019 Highest bang-to-buck temporary and direct hire 20190906 - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • Staffing Firm Survey 2019: Initial Results

    Key Findings: This report contains the initial findings of the 2019 Staffing Company Survey for staffing firms primarily operating in North America. It includes the complete survey questions and summary statistics. Additional detailed reports will follow this summary report. The survey was conducted in the summer of 2019 and reflects the opinions of 441 staffing firms. This sample is disproportionately composed of firms with greater than $10 million in revenue, so aggregate results reported are more reflective of these larger staffing firms. Where responses vary significantly by size, such differences will be noted in the analysis. Data includes: client contract terms; staffing company participation in online staffing; web and app enabled technology; internal staff benefits; sources of revenue; priorities and investments; referral bonuses; wages paid to temporary workers; and recruiting tactics. To access the complete report, please select the link below: North America Staffing Company Survey 2019 Initial Findings 20190906 - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • US Jobs Report: September 2019

    Event- On a seasonally adjusted basis, total nonfarm employment rose by 130,000 in August, according to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) in its monthly jobs report. Temporary help services gained 15,000 jobs for the month. The temporary staffing penetration rate remained at 2.00%. The national unemployment rate remained at 3.7%, as the labor force rose by over 500,000 over a record level in July.Background and Analysis- On a year-over-year (y/y) basis (August 2019 over August 2018), total nonfarm employment was up 1.4%, and monthly job gains have averaged approximately 173,000 over the past 12 months. Temporary help employment was up 0.7% y/y, with mild monthly job gains of approximately 1,700 over the past 12 months.Of the 15 major industry groups, 9 added jobs in August. The three that most drove total nonfarm employment growth (on a seasonally adjusted basis) were health & social assistance (+36,800), government (+34,000), and professional services excluding temporary help (+21,600). The three biggest decliners for the month were retail trade (-11,100), education (-5,400), and natural resources and mining (-5,000). The three biggest gainers in terms of y/y percentage growth were health & social assistance, construction, and professional services excluding temporary help (2.6%, 2.4% and 2.4%, respectively). Retail trade is the only category declining on a y/y basis (-0.5%).Y/y growth in average weekly earnings bounced back to 2.9% for August, from 2.7% in July, though still below the average of 3.2% from the prior twelve months.BLS Revisions- The change in total nonfarm payroll employment for July was revised from +164,000 to +159,000, and the change for June was revised from +193,000 to +178,000. With these revisions, total nonfarm employment gains were 20,000 lower than previously reported.The change in temporary help services employment for July was revised from +2,200 to -7,900 and the change for June was revised from -900 to -2,900. With these revisions, temporary help employment growth was lower than previously reported by 12,100 jobs. These downward revisions nearly offset the growth of 15,000 jobs for August (after three months in which downward revisions more than offset any growth in the current month).Staffing Industry Analysts’ Perspective- As the economic backdrop cools, we typically first see trends weaken among industrial jobs. After seeing weaker manufacturing trends from the Institute of Supply Management, it’s notable that industries heavy in industrial jobs such as natural resources/mining and transportation and warehousing declined for the month and have fallen out of the top 3 percentage gainers on a y/y basis, though construction seems to be holding up.We also typically see trends first weaken in temporary staffing. Despite the attractive headline of gaining 15,000 jobs in August, the rise was nearly offset by downward revisions, and the industry is still down year-to-date in terms of jobs.Members may download our jobs report tool by selecting the link below. Monthly Employment Situation September 2019 - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • MSP Part 1 Americas 2019

    Executive SummaryIn the period January - December 2018, the Managed Service Provider (MSP) market represented $141 billion of spend under management, with slower growth, estimated at 8% compared to 12% in 2017. The US continues to dominate the global MSP market, with 50% market share, although growth remains higher outside the US, with the EMEA region showing the greatest increase at 19%. Spend on global contracts covering three or more geographical regions continues to grow, as organizations expand program coverage, with approximately 30% of reported spend associated with global contracts. Market growth can be attributed to organic growth within programs, service expansion and net new clients, with 68% of reported net new clients adopting MSP for the first time. Financial Services endures as the dominant consumer of MSP, with a 21% share of spend, followed by Pharma/Biotech which, at 16%, has overtaken Technology/Telecom as the second largest client group. IT remains the most widely sourced occupational skill within MSP programs, with a 29% share of spend, up 4% from 2017.The largest MSPs globally (each with more than $6 billion of spend under management and unchanged from the previous year) are Allegis Global Solutions, KellyOCG, Pontoon, Randstad Sourceright and TAPFIN. Together they represent over 50% of the spend reported by the 26 participants in this study.Although the vendor-neutral model for sourcing temporary workers and independent contractors remains the most prevalent when measured by spend, the number of individual clients adopting alternative models is more evenly balanced, with only 33% of programs adopting a vendor-neutral model and a similar percentage adopting a master-supplier model.Proving that 2017’s blip was not the start of a reversal of the trend of previous years, there is once again more growth in SOW than temp/contract spend, with SOW/outsourcing spend representing 22% of reported spend under management.Although 23% of spend is attributed to programs with a value of $1 billion or more, 52% of individual programs manage spend of $10 million or less demonstrating that contrary to popular belief, the MSP model is not only the preserve of the large enterprise.There is emerging evidence that despite a slow start, ‘Total Talent’ solutions are finally beginning to gain traction, with 15% of MSP spend associated with a blended MSP/RPO service, (a y/y increase of 10%) and more providers actively promoting total talent services. Additionally, 19% of programs now include the provision of strategic workforce planning services.MSP providers are reporting a growth in the provision (and client adoption) of more sophisticated services beyond the core supplier management and billing proposition; direct sourcing services are provided in 31% of programs (up 25% y/y) and 12% offer a white-labeled service utilizing the client brand (up 4% y/y). MSP Global Landscape 2019 - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • Largest Staffing Firms in Italy

    We estimate that the Italian staffing market was worth €12.9 billion in 2018 and increased by +13% compared with 2017. Italy although not a particularly long established staffing market, due to periods of high sustained growth is now fifth largest national market in Europe and seventh globally. The market is highly consolidated, with Adecco as leader with a market share of 15%. Following their acquisition of Obiettivo Lavoro in 2016, Randstad is now the second largest staffing firm in Italy (13% of the market), followed by Manpower (11%) and GI Group in fourth with 9% of the market. The top three account for 39% of the market, however, the market share of this leading group has decreased slightly from 2017. Please note that we have ranked companies by revenue, according to industry custom, but this ranking should not be taken to imply that a firm with a higher rank provides a better service or more value to its shareholders. All currency amounts are in Euro (€). To download a full copy of this report, click below: Largest Staffing Firms in Italy - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • European Employment Barometer Q1 2019

       SIA is delighted to provide this interactive research tool in collaboration with the World Employment Confederation. Our European Employment Barometer provides users with the capability to interactively drill through various levels of data – filter, sort, and download.This tool provides an overview of key labour market indicators relevant to the staffing, recruitment and workforce solutions industry in Europe. The dashboard shows labour quarterly market trends in 33 different countries, from Q2 2016 until the latest data release.Data Sources and AnalysesData collated from Eurostat’s most recent labour market survey findings on Total Employment provide us with insights into various areas such as: Y/Y change in total employment Part-time workers as a percentage of total employment Employment rate Unemployment-to-employment transition We review Temporary Employment metrics by looking at the number of temporary employees per country and compared to a European average. Other areas we focus on are: Temporary employees as a percentage of total employees Temporary employees by length of contracts Temporary employees by education Temporary employees by occupation, and Temporary employees by economic activity The data in the Agency Work tab is provided directly by European staffing associations as part of our partnership with the World Employment Confederation. This data shows business trends in the temporary agency work sector in 12 countries, from Q2 2016 to the latest data release. We also provide a unique set of correlations between temporary agency work indicators and other economic factors to illustrate the impact, or not, of wider economic trends on temporary agency work.With the Gig economy and human cloud landscape playing an ever-increasing role in the workforce solutions ecosystem, new to this quarter, our Barometer will now include statistics regarding online freelance labour. The Online Labour Index (OLI) from the Oxford Internet Institute is the first economic indicator that provides an online gig economy equivalent of conventional labour market statistics. It measures the supply and demand of online freelance labour across countries and occupations by tracking the number of projects and tasks across platforms in real time.European Employment Barometer Interactive Too […]

  • MSP Part 1 EMEA 2019

    Executive SummaryIn the period January - December 2018, the Managed Service Provider (MSP) market represented $141 billion of spend under management, with slower growth, estimated at 8% compared to 12% in 2017. The US continues to dominate the global MSP market, with 50% market share, although growth remains higher outside the US, with the EMEA region showing the greatest increase at 19%. Spend on global contracts covering three or more geographical regions continues to grow, as organizations expand program coverage, with approximately 30% of reported spend associated with global contracts. Market growth can be attributed to organic growth within programs, service expansion and net new clients, with 68% of reported net new clients adopting MSP for the first time. Financial Services endures as the dominant consumer of MSP, with a 21% share of spend, followed by Pharma/Biotech which, at 16%, has overtaken Technology/Telecom as the second largest client group. IT remains the most widely sourced occupational skill within MSP programs, with a 29% share of spend, up 4% from 2017.The largest MSPs globally (each with more than $6 billion of spend under management and unchanged from the previous year) are Allegis Global Solutions, KellyOCG, Pontoon, Randstad Sourceright and TAPFIN. Together they represent over 50% of the spend reported by the 26 participants in this study.Although the vendor-neutral model for sourcing temporary workers and independent contractors remains the most prevalent when measured by spend, the number of individual clients adopting alternative models is more evenly balanced, with only 33% of programs adopting a vendor-neutral model and a similar percentage adopting a master-supplier model.Proving that 2017’s blip was not the start of a reversal of the trend of previous years, there is once again more growth in SOW than temp/contract spend, with SOW/outsourcing spend representing 22% of reported spend under management.Although 23% of spend is attributed to programs with a value of $1 billion or more, 52% of individual programs manage spend of $10 million or less demonstrating that contrary to popular belief, the MSP model is not only the preserve of the large enterprise.There is emerging evidence that despite a slow start, ‘Total Talent’ solutions are finally beginning to gain traction, with 15% of MSP spend associated with a blended MSP/RPO service, (a y/y increase of 10%) and more providers actively promoting total talent services. Additionally, 19% of programs now include the provision of strategic workforce planning services.MSP providers are reporting a growth in the provision (and client adoption) of more sophisticated services beyond the core supplier management and billing proposition; direct sourcing services are provided in 31% of programs (up 25% y/y) and 12% offer a white-labeled service utilizing the client brand (up 4% y/y). MSP Global Landscape 2019 - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • MSP Part 1 Americas 2019

    Executive SummaryIn the period January - December 2018, the Managed Service Provider (MSP) market represented $141 billion of spend under management, with slower growth, estimated at 8% compared to 12% in 2017. The US continues to dominate the global MSP market, with 50% market share, although growth remains higher outside the US, with the EMEA region showing the greatest increase at 19%. Spend on global contracts covering three or more geographical regions continues to grow, as organizations expand program coverage, with approximately 30% of reported spend associated with global contracts. Market growth can be attributed to organic growth within programs, service expansion and net new clients, with 68% of reported net new clients adopting MSP for the first time. Financial Services endures as the dominant consumer of MSP, with a 21% share of spend, followed by Pharma/Biotech which, at 16%, has overtaken Technology/Telecom as the second largest client group. IT remains the most widely sourced occupational skill within MSP programs, with a 29% share of spend, up 4% from 2017.The largest MSPs globally (each with more than $6 billion of spend under management and unchanged from the previous year) are Allegis Global Solutions, KellyOCG, Pontoon, Randstad Sourceright and TAPFIN. Together they represent over 50% of the spend reported by the 26 participants in this study.Although the vendor-neutral model for sourcing temporary workers and independent contractors remains the most prevalent when measured by spend, the number of individual clients adopting alternative models is more evenly balanced, with only 33% of programs adopting a vendor-neutral model and a similar percentage adopting a master-supplier model.Proving that 2017’s blip was not the start of a reversal of the trend of previous years, there is once again more growth in SOW than temp/contract spend, with SOW/outsourcing spend representing 22% of reported spend under management.Although 23% of spend is attributed to programs with a value of $1 billion or more, 52% of individual programs manage spend of $10 million or less demonstrating that contrary to popular belief, the MSP model is not only the preserve of the large enterprise.There is emerging evidence that despite a slow start, ‘Total Talent’ solutions are finally beginning to gain traction, with 15% of MSP spend associated with a blended MSP/RPO service, (a y/y increase of 10%) and more providers actively promoting total talent services. Additionally, 19% of programs now include the provision of strategic workforce planning services.MSP providers are reporting a growth in the provision (and client adoption) of more sophisticated services beyond the core supplier management and billing proposition; direct sourcing services are provided in 31% of programs (up 25% y/y) and 12% offer a white-labeled service utilizing the client brand (up 4% y/y). MSP Global Landscape 2019 - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • MSP Part 1 APAC 2019

    Executive SummaryIn the period January - December 2018, the Managed Service Provider (MSP) market represented $141 billion of spend under management, with slower growth, estimated at 8% compared to 12% in 2017. The US continues to dominate the global MSP market, with 50% market share, although growth remains higher outside the US, with the EMEA region showing the greatest increase at 19%. Spend on global contracts covering three or more geographical regions continues to grow, as organizations expand program coverage, with approximately 30% of reported spend associated with global contracts. Market growth can be attributed to organic growth within programs, service expansion and net new clients, with 68% of reported net new clients adopting MSP for the first time. Financial Services endures as the dominant consumer of MSP, with a 21% share of spend, followed by Pharma/Biotech which, at 16%, has overtaken Technology/Telecom as the second largest client group. IT remains the most widely sourced occupational skill within MSP programs, with a 29% share of spend, up 4% from 2017.The largest MSPs globally (each with more than $6 billion of spend under management and unchanged from the previous year) are Allegis Global Solutions, KellyOCG, Pontoon, Randstad Sourceright and TAPFIN. Together they represent over 50% of the spend reported by the 26 participants in this study.Although the vendor-neutral model for sourcing temporary workers and independent contractors remains the most prevalent when measured by spend, the number of individual clients adopting alternative models is more evenly balanced, with only 33% of programs adopting a vendor-neutral model and a similar percentage adopting a master-supplier model.Proving that 2017’s blip was not the start of a reversal of the trend of previous years, there is once again more growth in SOW than temp/contract spend, with SOW/outsourcing spend representing 22% of reported spend under management.Although 23% of spend is attributed to programs with a value of $1 billion or more, 52% of individual programs manage spend of $10 million or less demonstrating that contrary to popular belief, the MSP model is not only the preserve of the large enterprise.There is emerging evidence that despite a slow start, ‘Total Talent’ solutions are finally beginning to gain traction, with 15% of MSP spend associated with a blended MSP/RPO service, (a y/y increase of 10%) and more providers actively promoting total talent services. Additionally, 19% of programs now include the provision of strategic workforce planning services.MSP providers are reporting a growth in the provision (and client adoption) of more sophisticated services beyond the core supplier management and billing proposition; direct sourcing services are provided in 31% of programs (up 25% y/y) and 12% offer a white-labeled service utilizing the client brand (up 4% y/y). MSP Global Landscape 2019 - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • MSP Part 1 Americas 2019

    Executive SummaryIn the period January - December 2018, the Managed Service Provider (MSP) market represented $141 billion of spend under management, with slower growth, estimated at 8% compared to 12% in 2017. The US continues to dominate the global MSP market, with 50% market share, although growth remains higher outside the US, with the EMEA region showing the greatest increase at 19%. Spend on global contracts covering three or more geographical regions continues to grow, as organizations expand program coverage, with approximately 30% of reported spend associated with global contracts. Market growth can be attributed to organic growth within programs, service expansion and net new clients, with 68% of reported net new clients adopting MSP for the first time. Financial Services endures as the dominant consumer of MSP, with a 21% share of spend, followed by Pharma/Biotech which, at 16%, has overtaken Technology/Telecom as the second largest client group. IT remains the most widely sourced occupational skill within MSP programs, with a 29% share of spend, up 4% from 2017.The largest MSPs globally (each with more than $6 billion of spend under management and unchanged from the previous year) are Allegis Global Solutions, KellyOCG, Pontoon, Randstad Sourceright and TAPFIN. Together they represent over 50% of the spend reported by the 26 participants in this study.Although the vendor-neutral model for sourcing temporary workers and independent contractors remains the most prevalent when measured by spend, the number of individual clients adopting alternative models is more evenly balanced, with only 33% of programs adopting a vendor-neutral model and a similar percentage adopting a master-supplier model.Proving that 2017’s blip was not the start of a reversal of the trend of previous years, there is once again more growth in SOW than temp/contract spend, with SOW/outsourcing spend representing 22% of reported spend under management.Although 23% of spend is attributed to programs with a value of $1 billion or more, 52% of individual programs manage spend of $10 million or less demonstrating that contrary to popular belief, the MSP model is not only the preserve of the large enterprise.There is emerging evidence that despite a slow start, ‘Total Talent’ solutions are finally beginning to gain traction, with 15% of MSP spend associated with a blended MSP/RPO service, (a y/y increase of 10%) and more providers actively promoting total talent services. Additionally, 19% of programs now include the provision of strategic workforce planning services.MSP providers are reporting a growth in the provision (and client adoption) of more sophisticated services beyond the core supplier management and billing proposition; direct sourcing services are provided in 31% of programs (up 25% y/y) and 12% offer a white-labeled service utilizing the client brand (up 4% y/y). MSP Global Landscape 2019 - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • The Human Cloud Landscape: 2019 Update

    The “human cloud” is an emerging group of technology companies that connect workers to (typically contingent) work through a website or some other digital platform. SIA has defined three human cloud business models: online staffing, crowdsourcing and online work services. In 2018, firms processed $126.3 billion in global human cloud spend. Human cloud companies that primarily sell to consumers (B2C), such as Uber, Lyft, Postmates, or Instacart, accounted for the vast majority of human cloud spend, generating $118.6 billion in spend, by our estimates. Human cloud companies selling primarily to businesses (B2B) generated $7.8 billion. Total global human cloud revenue grew approximately 43% in 2018, driven primarily by the B2C segment (+45% y/y), which makes up well over 90% of human cloud spend. The B2B segment of the human cloud accelerated to 22% y/y growth, up from 19% y/y in 2017. About 75% of B2B human cloud transactions entail IT and creative job categories. Most B2B human cloud companies, while clearly internet-based technology companies, are also talent suppliers, many of which are increasingly adding more services layers. Other hybrid models, such as just-in-time staffing, have also thinned the line between online staffing and traditional temporary staffing. At the same time, more staffing firms are introducing technology platforms. Small to medium-sized businesses comprise the most demand in the B2B segment today, however the enterprise segment represents a significant growth opportunity. Vendor management systems are deepening more integrations with human cloud vendors as a competitive differentiator. Also, “direct sourcing” platforms are moving up the priority list for clients. A broad range of secular tailwinds are conducive for sustained double-digit growth for the B2B human cloud. However, we do not envision a rising tide raising all ships scenario to continue to persist, due in part to strong network effects of top performing platforms. The full report is available below: The Gig Economy and Human Cloud Landscape 2019 Update 20190903 - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • Performance of the Largest Staffing Firms in Australia

    • We estimate the Australian Staffing Market was worth AUD 20.4 billion in 2018 (USD 15.3 billion). This represents 3% of the global market and makes Australia the 8th largest market globally.• According to the IMF, the Australian economy grew by 2.8% in 2018, up from 2.4% in 2017. However, the rate of growth has slowed in Q1 2019 and was lower than forecast. The 1.8% annual expansion in Q1 2019 (vs Q1 2018) was the weakest since the global financial crisis.•The unemployment rate declined during 2018 reaching a low of 5.0% in the second half of the year. Despite this, there are signs of stress in the retail sector, residential building and motor vehicle sales.• The 26 staffing companies analysed in this report have combined revenues of AUD 13.4bn (USD 10.0 billion) and account for 66% of total market revenue.•Global players operating in the Australian market include Recruit, Persol, Manpower, Hays, Adecco, Randstad, Robert Walters, Robert Half, Michael Page, Brunel and Fircroft.• The local Australian companies covered in the report include Ignite, Finite, People Infrastructure (previously AWX), Rubicor, Ambition and Workpac.• The largest company in the Australian market is Hays with revenue of AUD 2.29 billion (USD 1.7 billion). Recruit (Chandler MacLeod plus Peoplebank) is second largest with revenue of AUD 1.78 billion (USD 1.3 billion). Revenue growth of the largest 26 firms for the latest year was 10.5%, above the previous year’s growth of 5.1%, and well above market growth. • Gross margin averaged 16.5% for the latest year, a reduction from the 16.8% achieved a year earlier. Gross margin ranged from a low of 6.1% for Fircroft to a high of 37.3% for Ambition.• The measure of profitability used in the review is EBITDA. The ratio of EBITDA to revenue averaged 2.4% in the latest year, the same as the previous year.To download a copy of the report please click below: Performance of the Largest Staffing Firms in Australia 20190830 - You do not have permission to view this object. […]