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Global Daily News

  • Kelly Services names chief marketing officer

    Kelly Services (NASD: KELYA) announced Pete Boland will take on the role of chief marketing officer effective Jan. 1.Boland replaces Carolyn Palmer, who retired earlier this year; he will report to executive VP Teresa Carroll. Boland's appointment follows the recent promotion of Kristin Supancich to chief human resources officer and the naming of Hannah Lim-Johnson as chief legal officer.Boland has more than 20 years of brand management experience and most recently was a managing partner at BHC Consulting, guiding C-suite leaders on how to build brands that reflect customers' needs and stand out from the competition. Prior to BHC, he spent five years as head of brand at Charles Schwab. He has also held marketing leadership roles with BlackRock, Microsoft, Visa International and Procter & Gamble.“Pete brings real passion for his craft, powerful insight from the market, and a proven ability to lead high-performing marketing teams that deliver winning results for the business,” Carroll said. “Marketing is a fast-moving profession and Pete has been on the leading edge throughout his career. He’s able to leverage big data, media, creative, social/digital, and sponsorship to develop clear, compelling strategies that connect with target audiences in alignment with a company’s purpose.” In 2010, Boland joined Red Tricycle as a marketing advisor and board member, a volunteer position he continues to hold at the venture-backed platform that connects parents with curated content on family activities. He has also served as an adjunct marketing professor at the San Francisco campus of the Hult International Business School; been a guest lecturer at the University of California, Berkeley; and taught brand strategy and advertising courses for the Association for National Advertisers.&nbs […]

  • MSP use plateaus in latest SIA staffing buyer survey; CW programs moving in-house?

    Use of managed service providers has been increasing, but that use appears to have plateaued for now, according to research by Staffing Industry Analysts.The three-year moving average of large firms that use an MSP was 63% this year, according to the new report “Workforce Solutions Buyers Survey: Trends in management strategies and priorities.” That’s unchanged from the three-year moving average taken last year, but down from the 66% recorded in 2015.The three-year moving average had grown from just 42% in 2009.It’s thought that some of the deceleration recorded this year in MSP use may be due to the trend of bringing contingent workforce programs in-house. The research found 13% had taken their contingent workforce program in house and 14% planned to do so in the next several years.Use of vendor management systems, on the other hand, grew this year to a three-year moving average of 73%, up from 71% last year. Its three-year average was just 16% in 2006.The report included 145 large firms in the Americas that use contingent labor. The full report is available to corporate members of Staffing Industry Analysts. […]

  • Addison Group acquires Texas-based management consulting firm

    Chicago-based professional staffing firm Addison Group acquired Bridgepoint Consulting, a Texas-based management consulting firm.The deal closed Nov. 16; terms of the transaction were not announced. Bridgepoint Consulting will now operate as Bridgepoint Consulting, an Addison Group company. The company brand and service lines will remain separate and distinct, with little change in the near term. Bridgepoint Consulting will continue to maintain its headquarters in Austin, Texas, and the company’s principals and team will retain their roles within the expanded organization.Bridgepoint Consulting provides a range of finance, technology and risk/compliance services. It does not offer staffing services and instead focuses primarily on consulting. Bridgepoint’s revenue has grown five-fold since 2010. The company has a team of 140 employees and Texas offices in Austin, Dallas and Houston.“We saw a clear opportunity to leverage Addison Group’s high-caliber team, proven performance, and industry-leading growth with a well-established firm offering a full suite of management consulting services and similar growth strategy,” Addison Group CEO Thomas Moran said.Addison Group in April acquired AIM Consulting, a technology consulting firm with headquarters in Seattle and branch offices in both Denver and Minneapolis. The addition of Bridgepoint Consulting brings Addison Group’s employee count to approximately 950 across 22 offices.Last December, private equity investment firm Odyssey Investment Partners LLC made an investment in Addison Group to support Addison’s organic and acquisition growth strategy. Odyssey is now the majority owner of Addison. […]

  • NACE reports employers plan 4% increase in recent grad hiring

    US employers plan to hire 4% more college grads from the class of 2018 than they did from the prior year’s class, according to a fall survey by the National Association of Colleges and Employers. While this is a deceleration from similar surveys in recent years — last year, employers said they planned to hire 5.8% more 2017 grads — results still to point to a positive job market for new college graduates, according to NACE.This year, the percentage of responding organizations that plan to increase their hires increased to 43.7% from 36.3% in the year-ago survey, while those maintaining their numbers dropped to 46.7% from 52.1%. And only 9.6% plan to cut their number of hires, down from 11.6%.Among those employers planning to increase their hires, company growth, retirements and the need for entry-level talent were the primary drivers behind hiring plans.The employers surveyed were members of NACE. The survey is conducted in two parts: fall and spring. This release is based on data collected from Aug. 9 through Oct. 2, 2017. A total of 201 NACE-member organizations participated. […]

  • Denmark – Jobindex reports third quarter turnover up 4%

    Danish job board Jobindex A/S (JOBNDX: CPH) reported net sales for the third quarter of DKK 68 million (€9.1 million), an increase of 4% compared to last year. (DKK millions) Q3 2017 Q3 2016 Change Q3 2017 (€ millions) Net Sales 68 65 4% 9.1 EBITDA (excluding special items) 25 23 8% 3.3 Operating Profit (before interest and tax) 22 15 46% 2.9 Jobindex reported that its advertising products saw a turnover of DKK 47 million (€6.3 million), an increase of 8% compared to DKK 44 million (€5.9 million) last year.Jobindex's recruitment products generated sales of DKK 5.7 million (€0.7 million) in the third quarter, the same as last year.Meanwhile Jobindex’s core job board, Jobbsafari generated sales of 2.7 million (€0.3 million), up 58% from DKK 1.7 million (€0.2 million) last year.Jobindex also operates media company Computerworld, which it acquired in May 2013, and job boards, StepStone and IT job bank, both of which were acquired on 1 March 2014.Computerworld reported a turnover of DKK 4.8 million (€0.6 million) against DKK 5.0 million (€0.6 million) last year.IT job bank had a turnover of 4.4 million (€0.5 million) in Q3 2017 against 4.2 million (€0.5 million) last year.StepStone reported a turnover of 3.3 million (€0.4 million) in the third quarter, steady from last year.Looking ahead Jobindex stated that it expects the growth from the first three quarters to continue onward and expects a turnover of DKK 300 million (40.3 million) for the year.In trading today Jobindex traded at DKK 1,620.00 (€217.66), down 4.71% on the day and 4.71% below its 52-week high of DKK 1,700.00 (€228.46), set on 17 November 2017. Based on its current share price the company has a market value of DKK 1.53 billion (€205.5 million). […]

  • UK – Politicians call for crackdown on gig economy firms that exploit employment law loopholes

    Commons committees are calling on the government to close loopholes that allow firms to underpay workers.The Work and Pensions and Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy Committees today published a joint report and draft bill to close the loopholes that allow companies to use bogus "self-employment" status as a route to cheap labour and tax avoidance.Frank Field, MP and Chair of the Work and Pensions Committee, said, "The two Committees are today presenting the Prime Minister with an opportunity to fulfil the promise she made on the steps of Downing Street on her first day in office, with a draft Bill that would end the mass exploitation of ordinary, hard-working people in the gig economy. The bill would put good business on a level playing field, not being undercut by bad business. It is time to close the loopholes that allow irresponsible companies to underpay workers, avoid taxes and free ride on our welfare system."The report added that new laws and tougher enforcement are needed to protect workers.“Uber, Deliveroo and others like to bang the drum for the benefits of flexibility for their workforce but currently all the burden of this flexibility is picked up by taxpayers and workers,” Rachel Reeves MP, Chair of the Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy Committee, said. “This must change.”“We say that companies should pay higher wages when they are asking people to work extra hours or on zero-hours contracts,” Reeves said. “Recent cases demonstrate a need for greater clarity in the law to protect workers. Responsible businesses deserve a level-playing field to compete, not a system which rewards unscrupulous businesses. We need new laws but also much tougher enforcement, to weed out those businesses seeking to exploit complex labour laws, and workers, for their competitive advantage."The Taylor Review, published in July, made a number of recommendations to employment practices and called for a new category of worker to be created called ‘Dependent contractors’.Matthew Taylor commented on the report, “This excellent report shows that whatever concerns the government has about my recommendations, parliamentary support is no longer a reason not to pursue them.”The Committees also stated in the bill that the current situation in the gig economy puts an unacceptable burden on workers to address poor practice through an expensive and risky court case while the companies themselves operate with relative impunity. Earlier this year gig economy firms Uber and Deliveroo have been brought to court over the issue of self-employment. Earlier this month Uber lost an appeal against a tribunal ruling over the employment rights of its drivers. Last week, Deliveroo won in a case that ruled its riders are self-employed and not employees.The bill also called for loopholes that enables agency workers to be paid less than permanent employees doing the same job to be closed. Julia Kermode, chief executive of The Freelancer & Contractor Services Association, commented on the bill, “As the gig economy is on the rise we need to act to protect the vulnerable and precarious whilst not unfairly penalising genuinely self-employed people.  Introducing fines for falsely classifying workers as self-employed could be an effective deterrent and go some way towards preventing exploitation of those in precarious roles, but care is needed because employment status is complex and experts don’t always agree, so fines could unfairly penalise companies that have simply made a mistake rather than deliberately set out to exploit their workforce.&rdquo […]

  • Netherlands – Deliveroo rider launches suit against courier firm over employment status

    A Deliveroo bicycle courier based in the Netherlands is launching a lawsuit against the company’s decision to replace all of its employed couriers in the Netherlands with freelancers (known as zzp’ers in the Netherlands).The Deliveroo rider, Sytze Ferwerda, will be financially backed by FNV (the Netherlands Trade Union Confederation) and the Dutch Labour Party. Ferwerda told Rtlz.nl that Deliveroo’s contracts are disguised employment contracts. "I am a student, I am not my own company", Ferwerda said. Ferwerda added that working in the gig economy should be done on the basis of an employment contract.Last week, more than 50 Deliveroo bicycle couriers protested through the center of Amsterdam against Deliveroo’s plans to work only with freelancers, which is set to take effect from February 2018.Deliveroo has stated that most of its deliverers want more flexibility and that the freelancer zzp model is the best way to do this.&nbs […]

  • UK – Firms failing to tackle unconscious bias, finds Adecco

    More than a third, or 39%, of UK hiring managers have not received training in unconscious bias best-practice as part of the recruitment process in their current company, according to research from Adecco.The research, which was carried out by Opinion Matters, surveyed more than 500 hiring managers. It also showed that two years since then prime minister, David Cameron, launched a pledge to tackle discrimination by recruiting on a ‘name blind’ basis, 65% of UK organisations are still not using blind CVs.Meanwhile, 26% think that having regular training would be the most effective way to eliminate unconscious bias as part of the recruitment process, followed by 17% who think that removing age from CVs would have the biggest impact. Furthermore, the research showed that if forced to remove one piece of information from CVs, 23% would remove hobbies rather than names (8%) to tackle unconscious bias and 10% of respondents think that removing pictures on CVs would help people to make unbiased decisions in the recruitment process.“Despite unconscious bias being as big an issue as ever, too many organisations are still not taking active steps to tackle the problem,” Alex Fleming, President of General Staffing, The Adecco Group UK and Ireland, said. “Training hiring managers in unconscious bias practice and using blind CVs are relatively easy actions for organisations to take, so it’s concerning that their deployment remains relatively low.”The research added that 20% of companies are using AI or technology to help eliminate unconscious bias. A further 25% are not currently using AI or technology but are looking to introduce it as part of the recruitment process. […]

  • Singapore – Advancer Global partners with TEE International to acquire Chiang Kiong Group

    Advancer Global, an integrated services provider offering workforce solutions and services in Singapore, announced that it has entered into a joint venture with Singapore-based construction engineering company TEE International and an unnamed investor to acquire Chiang Kiong Group for SGD 18.5 million (USD 13.6 million).The Chiang Kiong Group is a waste management solutions firm and owns subsidiaries Chiang Kiong Resources (Paper) Pte. Ltd.) and Envotek Engineering Pte. Ltd.A joint venture company will be formed by TEE’s wholly-owned subsidiary, TEE Infrastructure Private Limited, which will hold a majority stake of 50.1%; Advancer Global’s wholly-owned subsidiary, Advancer Global Facility Pte. Ltd., which will own 20.1%; and the unnamed independent third party investor, which will own 29.8%.“We are excited with our participation in this strategic acquisition as it marks our inaugural collaboration with TEE Group and leapfrogs Advancer Global Group into waste management, which is a natural integration to our existing cleaning and stewarding services segment,” Gary Chin, CEO & ExecutiveDirector of Advancer Global, said. “We are confident that this acquisition will not only strengthen but also create synergies within our Building Management Services division that aims to offer a holistic suite of solutions and services to industrial, commercial and residential properties in the realm of facilities management.”“We are elated to have Advancer Global Group partake in this joint venture to cement our strategic alliance,” Edwin Neo, Head of Infrastructure for TEE said. “This acquisition complements TEE Infrastructure’s business strategy of building capabilities within the Water, Power and Environmental value chain. We firmly believe that both TEE and Advancer Global will be able to value-add to Chiang Kiong Group, in turn growing and expanding its business in the industrial and commercial environmental service space.&rdquo […]

  • APAC – More than half of jobseekers frustrated by lengthy recruitment process

    One in two job seekers (53%) across Singapore, Hong Kong and Malaysia say that they develop a negative impression of the prospective employer if the hiring process takes longer than expected, according to a survey from Randstad.The Randstad Candidate Expectations survey reported that an efficient hiring process is more important to job seekers as compared to other factors such as the company’s reputation and workplace environment. Furthermore, 89% of job seekers are more likely to reject an offer if the process takes more than four weeks across Singapore, Hong Kong and Malaysia.“Job seekers prioritise their own career development during the search process,” Managing Director for Randstad Singapore, Hong Kong and Malaysia, Michael Smith said. “As such, employers should adopt a needs-based approach towards recruitment by placing the job seekers’ career objectives and goals first.”Across the three countries, communication levels, degree of personal interaction and the recruiter or hiring manager are important elements to at least one-third of job seekers during the recruitment process. The bottom three considerations that impact the job seeker’s experience are workplace environment, online presence and the use of innovative, emerging technologies.The results were broken down as follows:“Which of the following are most likely to create a negative impression of a prospective employer during your job search?&rdquo […]

  • APAC – Employees' poor health and sleep habits cause loss of workplace productivity

    The poor health and sleep habits of workers are causing loss of workplace productivity according to a study from AIA Vitality.The survey, Healthiest Workplace Survey 2018, polled employees in Malaysia, Australia, Singapore and Hong Kong and reported that employee absenteeism can cost a business billions of dollars per year.In Malaysia, productivity loss was measured at 67 days a year lost due to poor sleep habits, as well as employees being overworked, stressed, and leading unhealthy lifestyles. Meanwhile, 56% of Malaysians sleep less than 7 hours a night and 53% say they have at least one case of work-related stress.In Australia productivity loss stood at 45 days per year while 25.9% slept less than 7 hours per night and 50% said they have at least one case of work-related stress.In Singapore, the survey showed that 73% of employees’ health had deteriorated while the average Singapore adult sleep 6.4 hours a night. In Hong Kong, the average sleep duration was 6.5 hours a night while the survey showed that 74% of adults’ health has deteriorated.They study surveyed more than 10,000 employees across the four countries. […]

  • Japan – More than half of SME companies are dealing with staff shortages (Sora News)

    More than half, or 60%, of small and medium-sized companies in Japan are understaffed reports Sora News with data from Japan Chamber of Commerce and Industry. Akio Mimura, Chairman of JCCI, has appealed to the government to relax job requirements for foreigners to help combat the staff shortages. Akio proposed for the government to accept and integrate low and non-skilled foreigners into construction and transportation industries. Currently, the Japanese government has a points-based preferential immigration system in place, one which essentially excludes the large majority of workers due to its strict requirements. […]

Latest Research

  • Global Laws on Co-employment, Deemed Employment and Joint Liability in Staffing Relationships

    This report looks at the differences between joint employment, joint liability and deemed employment and highlights some of the countries where these risks arise in relation to the use of contingent agency labor. Various US laws impose joint and several liability for employer obligations by finding both the client hirer of a temporary worker, and the staffing agency that supplies the worker, to be joint employers in certain circumstances. Outside of the US, many jurisdictions impose joint liability on the users of contingent workers supplied by a third-party staffing firm for specific obligations in the event that such obligations are not complied with by the staffing supplier. In some countries, the law goes further and provides that the worker is deemed to be the employee of the hirer, in place of the staffing supplier. Legal Disclaimer: This report is provided solely for the purposes of information, and should not be considered legal advice. It is always recommended to seek the advice of qualified legal counsel before taking action.To download a pdf copy of this report click below: Global Laws on CoEmployment, Deemed Employment and Joint Liability in Staffing Relationships_CWS_20171113 - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • Workforce Solutions Webinar – VMS/MSP Landscape

    Sponsored by DCR Workforce Vendor Management Systems (VMS) and Managed Service Provider (MSP) offerings are continually expanding. Key integrations are underway as these programs no longer work in silos in the workforce solutions business. In this complimentary annual webinar, we explored how these products and services can best be integrated in your business to deliver the greatest value. Learn how to find the right solution for your program and hear the latest findings from SIA’s leading market research on the VMS and MSP landscape. Speakers: Bryan Peña, SVP, Contingent Workforce Strategies, CCWP, Staffing Industry AnalystsElizabeth Rennie, Global Workforce Solutions Research Director, CCWP, Staffing Industry AnalystsRichard Snider, VP - Channel Partnerships, DCR WorkforceDownload presentation (PDF)Watch webinar video below. […]

  • Workforce Solutions Buyers Survey 2017 - Trends in management strategies and priorities

    Key Findings We asked companies about their use of 21 workforce solutions strategies. The five most used strategies are VMS (78% of respondents), use of domestic outsourcing (76%), consolidation of staffing suppliers (70%), use of offshoring (69%) and program for diversity suppliers (64%). We also asked respondents about which of the 21 strategies were planned for exploration during the next two years. The strategies most mentioned include total talent acquisition (48%), inclusion of contingent workforce as part of strategic planning (48%), trying out new staffing suppliers (42%) and global management of CW program (42%). Buyers of primarily professional contingent workers were significantly more likely to use offshoring (75% vs. 39%), a vendor for independent contractor (IC) compliance (61% vs. 30%), and global management of their contingent workforce program (38% vs.17%) then buyers of primarily commercial contingent workers. Buyers with larger contingent spend were significantly more likely than buyers with smaller contingent spend to use global management of their contingent workforce (46% vs. 20%), supplier tiering (for example, establishing tier 1 and tier 2 suppliers) (70% vs. 50%), consolidation of staffing suppliers (81% vs. 62%), and VMS (86% vs. 71%). The three-year-average percent of companies using VMS rose dramatically from 16% in 2006 to 64% in 2010. Since then, this figure has grown more slowly, reaching a level of 73% in 2017. After growing from 42% to 66% between 2009 and 2015, the three-year-average percent of companies using MSP has declined slightly to 63% during the last two years. Some of the decline may be due to the trend of bringing a contingent workforce program“in house”, as mentioned on page nine. 13% of companies indicated that they had brought management of their contingent workforce program “in house” in the last year,and another 14% of companies plan to do so in the next several years. The top contingent workforce program priorities most commonly reported among respondents were reducing/controlling costs(22%), providing excellent customer service to internal stakeholders (18%) and globally integrating their contingent workforce program (11%). Nearly three fourths of respondents spend half or more of their time on contingent workforce responsibilities. The increasing trend over time may in part be due to the increasing size and complexity of contingent workforce programs, as well as the emerging role of contingent workforce managers as a profession. To download the report, please click on the link below. WS Buyers Survey 2017 - Americas - Trends in management strategies and priorities 20171110 - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • SI Report Webinar - November 2017

    In this webinar topics covered include: An update on sourcing and automation technology Trends in supplier management strategies, priorities, & contingent labor share from our Contingent Buyer Survey Training, executive compensation, participation in online staffing & automation from our Staffing Company Survey North America legal and regulatory updates And of course the latest updates on the state of the economy, employment trends and developments in the U.S. staffing industry.Download the presentation slides.Select the play button to begin viewing. […]

  • Global Laws on Co-employment, Deemed Employment and Joint Liability in Staffing Relationships

    This report looks at the differences between joint employment, joint liability and deemed employment and highlights some of the countries where these risks arise in relation to the use of contingent agency labour. Various US laws impose joint and several liability for employer obligations by finding both the client hirer of a temporary worker, and the staffing agency that supplies the worker, to be joint employers in certain circumstances. Outside of the US, many jurisdictions impose joint liability on the users of contingent workers supplied by a third-party staffing firm for specific obligations in the event that such obligations are not complied with by the staffing supplier. In some countries, the law goes further and provides that the worker is deemed to be the employee of the hirer, in place of the staffing supplier. Legal Disclaimer: This report is provided solely for the purposes of information, and should not be considered legal advice. It is always recommended to seek the advice of qualified legal counsel before taking action.To download a pdf copy of this report click below: Global Laws on CoEmployment, Deemed Employment and Joint Liability in Staffing Relationships_CWS_20171113 - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • Workforce Solutions Webinar – VMS/MSP Landscape

    Sponsored by DCR Workforce Vendor Management Systems (VMS) and Managed Service Provider (MSP) offerings are continually expanding. Key integrations are underway as these programs no longer work in silos in the workforce solutions business. In this complimentary annual webinar, we explored how these products and services can best be integrated in your business to deliver the greatest value. Learn how to find the right solution for your program and hear the latest findings from SIA’s leading market research on the VMS and MSP landscape. Speakers: Bryan Peña, SVP, Contingent Workforce Strategies, CCWP, Staffing Industry AnalystsElizabeth Rennie, Global Workforce Solutions Research Director, CCWP, Staffing Industry AnalystsRichard Snider, VP - Channel Partnerships, DCR WorkforceDownload presentation (PDF)Watch webinar video below. […]

  • Europeans and their Languages

    When you need to access talent around in Europe, don’t let borders get in the way of finding exceptional candidates. Research from the EU can help you identify those pockets of candidates who speak your language or the languages that you need.Within the European Union, there are 24 officially recognised languages, more than 60 indigenous regional and minority languages, and many non-indigenous languages spoken by migrant communities, notably Arabic, Turkish, Urdu, Hindi and Chinese.In accordance with the EU population, the most widely spoken mother tongue is German (16%), followed by Italian and English (13% each), French (12%), then Spanish and Polish (8% each).The five most widely spoken foreign languages are English (38%), French (12%), German (11%), Spanish (7%) and Russian (5%).Just over half of Europeans (54%) can hold a conversation in at least one additional language, a quarter (25%) can speak at least two additional languages, and one in ten (10%) are conversant in at least three.Data for the three most widely known languages that nationals can speak well enough to have a conversation are shown in chart below below. The full data set for the study can be found here. We have adapted this work to be used staffing firm and buyers of contingent labour and this can be downloaded below: European Languages - You do not have permission to view this object. The spreadsheet also includes date on the level of skill in English, French, Germany, Spanish and Russian by country.In the EU study, two-thirds of Europeans (67%) consider English as one of the most useful languages for themselves, followed by German (17%), French (16%), Spanish (14%) and Chinese (6%).The most useful languages for the UK as judged by British Council in their survey Languages for the Future are in order: Spanish (1), Arabic (2), French (3), Mandarin Chinese (4), German (5), Portuguese (6), Italian (7), Russian (=8), Turkish (=8) and Japanese (10).As schools and other educational institutions provide the main opportunity for the vast majority of people to learn languages, you may find data for the class of 2014 useful. In brief this shows that over 95% of students in general upper secondary education in Luxembourg, Finland, Romania, Slovakia, France, Liechtenstein, Estonia and Slovenia are learning two of more foreign languages. While the number is under 10% in Portugal, Ireland, United Kingdom and Greece. The most studied  languages are English (94%), French (23%), Spanish (19%), German (19%), Italian (3%) and Russian (3%).Data for the countries where various languages are studied most is in the chart below: On the demand side data from Top Languages Jobs shows the following picture. Across the four largest staffing markets in Europe (France, Germany, Netherlands and the UK) English is in most demand followed by German the requirement for speakers of all other languages shown in the chart below fall under 10%. […]

  • Largest Healthcare Staffing firms

    We believe the European Healthcare staffing market was worth €6 billion in 2016, with sales increasing by 3% compared to 2015. This is the second largest professional staffing market in Europe in terms of revenue. Independent Clinical Services is the clear market leader. The private equity-backed group has grown aggressively through acquisitions since 2010. Randstad Care holds the runner-up seat, followed by Medacs Global Group. In 2016, the UK represented over 40% of the Healthcare staffing market in Europe. Four of the five fastest-growing firms in our ranking are all UK based and part of the select group of suppliers to the National Health Service (NHS). Swedish suppliers also performed strongly in 2016. There are a number of drivers that the Healthcare staffing segment benefits from, including short-term ones, such as acute staff shortages; and long-term drivers, such as the ageing of the European population and the demand for personalised health care services. To download a full copy of the report, click below: Largest Healthcare Staffing Firms in Europe 20171109 - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • Global Laws on Co-employment, Deemed Employment and Joint Liability in Staffing Relationships

    This report looks at the differences between joint employment, joint liability and deemed employment and highlights some of the countries where these risks arise in relation to the use of contingent agency labour. Various US laws impose joint and several liability for employer obligations by finding both the client hirer of a temporary worker, and the staffing agency that supplies the worker, to be joint employers in certain circumstances. Outside of the US, many jurisdictions impose joint liability on the users of contingent workers supplied by a third-party staffing firm for specific obligations in the event that such obligations are not complied with by the staffing supplier. In some countries, the law goes further and provides that the worker is deemed to be the employee of the hirer, in place of the staffing supplier. Legal Disclaimer: This report is provided solely for the purposes of information, and should not be considered legal advice. It is always recommended to seek the advice of qualified legal counsel before taking action.To download a pdf copy of this report click below: Global Laws on CoEmployment, Deemed Employment and Joint Liability in Staffing Relationships_CWS_20171113 - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • Workforce Solutions Webinar – VMS/MSP Landscape

    Sponsored by DCR Workforce Vendor Management Systems (VMS) and Managed Service Provider (MSP) offerings are continually expanding. Key integrations are underway as these programs no longer work in silos in the workforce solutions business. In this complimentary annual webinar, we explored how these products and services can best be integrated in your business to deliver the greatest value. Learn how to find the right solution for your program and hear the latest findings from SIA’s leading market research on the VMS and MSP landscape. Speakers: Bryan Peña, SVP, Contingent Workforce Strategies, CCWP, Staffing Industry AnalystsElizabeth Rennie, Global Workforce Solutions Research Director, CCWP, Staffing Industry AnalystsRichard Snider, VP - Channel Partnerships, DCR WorkforceDownload presentation (PDF)Watch webinar video below. […]

  • Largest Global Engineering Firms

    • We estimate the global engineering temporary staffing revenue market in 2016 to be worth $28.3 billion. Added together, the top 20 firms generated $9.9 billion in revenue, accounting for 35% of the market, by our estimates. The complete list of 20 firms can be found on page five of this report.• In this market share report, we have ranked companies in order of revenue size, according to industry custom, but this ranking should not be taken to imply that a firm with a higher rank provides better service or more value to its shareholders.• Staffing firms varied in degree of financial transparency, and even when forthcoming with information, we reserve the right to adjust data for the sake of consistency. Therefore, for all firms in this report, revenue shown should be considered an estimation by Staffing Industry Analysts.• Market share percentages in this report were calculated by dividing each company’s revenue figure by our estimate of $28.3 billion for the global engineering temporary staffing market in 2016.• Overall, we believe that this list is accurate and can be used appropriately to get a “big picture” reading of the global engineering temporary staffing industry landscape. However, as transparency and availability of information from staffing companies can vary from one year to the next, this year’s estimates may not be comparable to those of previous years in all cases. For that reason, we did not display prior year revenue estimates in this report.• Additional details on the methodology of this report are provided on page eight.• This report should be read in conjunction with our ‘Global Engineering Report 2017’ report.To download a copy of the report click below:  Largest Global Engineering Firms 110717 - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • Workforce Solutions Buyers Survey 2017 - Contingent share of workforce

    Key Findings Each year, we ask large (1,000+ employees) companies: “Estimate the percent of your organization's workforce that is contingent.” We define contingent workers as all non-permanent workers including agency temporary workers, internal temporary workers/interns/seasonal workers, freelancers, independent contractors and statement-of work (SOW) consultants, but excluding part-time regular employees. In 2017, companies reported that contingent workers comprised a median 17% of their workforce and an average (mean) of 18%. On average, survey respondents project that their contingent share will be higher in two years and even higher in ten years. In ten years, the median contingent share is projected to increase from 16% today to 22%, and the average contingent share is projected to increase from 17% today to 24%. When asked about their mix of types of workers, companies reported that regular full-time and part-time employees comprised 65% and 4% of their workforce on average. Agency temporary workers, statement-of-work (SOW) consultants and workers from outsourced vendors constituted 9%, 9% and 7%, respectively.In looking at the distribution of responses regarding agency temporary workers as a percentage of workforce, survey respondents were most likely (41%) to indicate that agency temporary workers constituted 6-10% of their total workforce. 23% of respondents reported that agency temporary workers comprised more than 10% of their total workforce. Among survey respondents who reported use of freelancers, nearly all indicated that freelancers constituted 1-5% of their total workforce. In looking at the net percent of firms expecting an increasing share (percent expecting an increasing share minus the percent expecting a decreasing share) for each category of workers, agency temporary workers (net 33%) and freelancers (net 32%) are the categories with the broadest expectation for increasing share of the workforce. The projected growth for freelancers may be due in part to their current low use. Other categories with a bullish outlook include temporary workers internally sourced (net 26%) and statement-of-work (SOW) consultants (net 22%). To download the full report, please select the link below: WS Buyers Survey 2017 - APAC - Contingent share of workforce 20171103 - You do not have permission to view this object. […]