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Global Daily News

  • Staffing website demos increase workers' use of them: SIA research

    About a quarter of temporary workers barely look at their staffing firm’s website or app, and many more are just slightly aware of the features such as viewing payroll information or available jobs, according to a recent report released by Staffing Industry Analysts. Only 20% said such tools have been a huge help, despite staffing firm investments in these technologies.However, website demonstrations markedly increase temp usage. Those who had been walked through the features of their staffing firm’s websites and apps were both far more aware of the features and much more likely to make use of them. Only 40% of temporary workers reported their firm had given them such a demo.“Website demos look like a best practice to me,” said the author of the report, Jon Osborne, VP strategic research. “The more temps self-serve through a staffing firm’s technology, the less help they need from internal staff. If you’re going to invest in technology, it makes sense to go the extra mile and spend some time making sure your target users know what is available to them.”The survey asked temp workers, “Of those features that your staffing firm’s website or app does not offer, which two do you most want?” The ability to “rate client” garnered the most responses; however, this is also the feature respondents said was least frequently offered to them. The top-five selected features that are desired but not currently offered are: Rate client: 23% View available jobs: 22% Be pre-qualified and select and confirm specific assignments or shifts at will: 18% Apply for available jobs: 17% Indicate desired job type and be automatically accepted for temporary assignments: 15% In an open-ended question, temporary workers most commonly suggested these four improvements in websites and apps: add more capability, improve the technology, organize the website/app better, and demonstrate the website/app.The 2018 Temporary Worker Survey was implemented in conjunction with Staffing Industry Analysts’ “Best Staffing Companies to Work For” competition. The survey was conducted in late 2017 and reflects the opinions of 3,975 temporary worker respondents from 37 staffing firms; no single firm accounted for more than 13% of respondents. […]

  • American gig workers’ earnings total $1.4 trillion: index

    Collective annual earnings of American gig workers total $1.4 trillion, and 59% use digital marketplaces to find new opportunities, according to the Gig Economy Index released today by PYMNTS and Hyperwallet.Those aged 18 to 34 rely on digital marketplaces the most, with the arts, design, entertainment, sports and media space being the most prevalent. More than 55% of gig workers rely on a single entity to help them find gigs, and nearly half are very or extremely satisfied with the service. Research respondents listed real-time client identification as the most important benefit of using a digital marketplace such as Upwork or Elance, and the attractiveness of immediate payment availability correlates as well.As many as 60% of the gig workers surveyed reported they would neither want nor need regular employment, and only 4% of them joined the gig economy workforce to expand their skill set. Higher-income individuals with higher education levels are more aware of the gig economy compared to lower-income, less-educated subsets of the population, and slightly more than half of gig workers work on projects requiring a very specific skillset such as engineering and architecture.The research also found 37% of gig workers receive at least 40% of their income from gig economy jobs, and 55% maintain regular, full-time jobs.The survey included 10,044 US respondents, 65% of whom do not work in the gig economy and 35% who are now working in the gig economy or have worked in it in the past year. […]

  • San Francisco adds 4,375 tech jobs, New York and Boston also increase digital jobs: report

    The San Francisco Bay Area increased at a rapid pace in the first quarter, with more than 4,375 new jobs added for a 2.1% employment gain, according to the Digital Jobs Index for the first quarter of 2018 released today by executive search firm ON Partners. New York City showed a 1.8% gain and added almost 1,280 jobs. Boston’s headcount growth was slower at 1.1%, with an increase in headcount of 650 people.ON Partners’ report looked at tech jobs in the San Francisco, New York and Boston areas.Bay Area growth was mainly driven by the success of its largest employers, which added extensively to their payrolls. New York growth was driven by broad hiring across the software and internet sectors, with 70% of companies increasing headcount. However, Boston’s largest companies were relatively slow to add to their payrolls and the hiring scene was mixed, with only 52% of companies adding jobs while the remaining 48% either decreased headcount or remained flat.“The bottom line is that big Bay Area companies clearly won the jobs race in Q1,” said John Barrett, partner at ON Partners. “A possible explanation for Boston’s relatively low growth in hiring is that much of the venture capital dollars are flowing into the city’s biotech sector, which is muting employment growth in software and internet companies.”The top 10 companies showing the largest headcount gains in the Bay Area: Google Facebook Apple Amazon Workday Uber Lyft eBay PayPal ServiceNow The top 10 companies showing the largest headcount gains in New York: Amazon WeWork Google Compass Facebook Uber IBM Squarespace FreeWheel Indeed.com The top 10 companies showing the largest headcount gains in Boston: Wayfair Amazon HubSpot ezCater EverQuote Salsify LogMeIn Mathworks Facebook Intralinks The Digital Jobs Index tracks three key areas: headcount growth among the leading 100 software and internet companies in each city; headcount growth driven by the top 10 companies (an indication of breadth and depth of hiring); and the percentage of companies that increased their headcount.&nbs […]

  • Professionals increasingly check in with office while on vacation: Accountemps

    Professionals plan to take an average of nine vacation days this summer but most will still check in with the office, according to a survey by Accountemps, a division of Robert Half International Inc. (NYSE: RHI).The survey found 44% of respondents said they typically don't check in at all with the office, down from 47% in a similar survey last year and 59% in 2016. Seventy percent of this year’s respondents ages 18 to 34 will maintain some contact with work, compared with only 39% of those ages 55 and older.The frequency of office check-ins varied by market. Never out of office: Nashville, Dallas and Los Angeles lead in terms of the number of workers who plan to take no summer vacation. Checking in constantly: Employees in New York, Charlotte, Los Angeles, Miami and Seattle are most likely to connect with the office at least several times a week. Leaving town and never looking back: Professionals in Cleveland, Minneapolis, Denver, Philadelphia and Salt Lake City are best at disconnecting from work while out of office. “Employees need time away from work to rest, relax and recharge,” said Michael Steinitz, executive director for Accountemps. “Yet for an increasing number of people, totally disconnecting from the office can have the reverse effect and add stress.”Steinitz noted that some workers enjoy greater peace of mind when they allow themselves to check in a few times — but not much more than that — while on vacation. “Doing so confirms that all is well, which allows them to stop worrying and focus on relaxing instead,” he said.The survey was developed by Accountemps and conducted by an independent research firm. It includes responses from more than 2,800 workers in 28 US markets. […]

  • Airline mechanic staffing companies’ exec gets 12-month sentence in immigration case

    The former VP of operations for two separate airline mechanic staffing companies was sentenced Thursday to 12 months in prison for making false statements in support of legal permanent resident petitions for dozens of mechanics, US Citizenship and Immigration Services announced.The companies’ staff performed heavy maintenance on aircraft at a variety of airfields nationwide; Eleno Quinteros, Jr., of Chula Vista, Calif., was responsible for recruiting aircraft mechanics from Mexico to work in the US for the companies, and for helping recruits to obtain work visas such as TN or H-2B visas. According to the indictment, after assisting his recruits in obtaining work visas to come to the US, Quinteros then agreed to help at least 85 of them pursue legal permanent residency in exchange for unlawful fees. According to the plea agreement, he collected as much as $567,480 from approximately 85 foreign labor workers in connection with the charged applications. Less than half of the money Quinteros collected was actually paid to immigration attorneys assisting with the applications, while Quinteros himself kept an estimated $372,715, according to court filings. Employers are prohibited by law from demanding payment for their fees, including attorneys’ fees.Quinteros on Aug. 10, 2017, pleaded guilty to a single count of making a false claim in support of an immigration application. He admitted in his plea that the underlying scheme involved more than 25 immigration documents. Quinteros was previously ordered to pay back $292,526 in illegal fees collected from 52 of the identifiable mechanics. […]

  • UK – HMRC IR35 consultation for the private sector to hit end users and staffing firms

    HMRC published an IR35 consultation covering off-payroll working in the private sector on Friday which aims to address compliance with off-payroll working rules in the private sector. The consultation will close on 10 August 2018.Last April, HMRC implemented reforms of off-payroll working rules for the public sector. HMRC added that “evidence suggests that the public sector reform has been effective in increasing compliance.” HMRC has provided research on the impact of ‘Off-Payroll Reform in the Public Sector’ which might indicate how such rules could impact the private sector. Legal firm, Osborne Clarke have also published a useful insight detailing their predictions on the likely impact.Kevin Barrow, Partner at Osborne Clarke, commented on the publication of the consultation. Barrow addressed status assessments, stating, "The government is aware that some suppliers to the public sector have decided to ignore the end user assessment/HMRC tool and instead carry out their own assessments. In some instances these suppliers sit below the staffing company in the public sector supply chain and as such may be deemed, under the 2017 public sector IR35 arrangements, to be the "Fee Payer" with liability for IR35 (thus, they claim, exonerating staffing companies and end users). Whether this is currently effective will depend on exactly how the arrangements have been set up – there are many who consider some versions of this arrangement NOT to be effective. And some public sector end users have prohibited use of an extended supply chain such that someone other than the staffing company is the liable Fee Payer.""In any event the government seems to be considering taking action to prevent, or very significantly reduce, the use of this sort of approach in the new consultation but we predict there will be a battle over that with the probability that proper assessments by persons other than the end user and other than using the HMRC tool will still be permissible under any new legislation," Barrow said. "However people using that approach may find themselves constantly challenged by HMRC so care will need to be taken."The most significant outcome of the consultation is the likelihood that, just like the public sector rules, end-users and staffing companies will be held liable for tax and social charges in respect of Personal Service Company contractors who “fail” IR35 various penalties. Companies found to have unlawful tax schemes in their supply chains, could face civil and criminal liability under various new legislation such as the Criminal Finance Act 2017 and other new measures suggested.Then in last year’s Autumn Budget, the government announced that it would consult on how to tackle non-compliance with the off-payroll working rules in the private sector.HMRC’s IR35 consultation for 'off-payroll' working in the private sector states that it is looking at “improving the rules around 'off-payroll' working so contractors who work through their own company pay the right tax."It also states, "the consultation will specifically look at how to increase compliance with the existing 'off-payroll' working rules. These rules mean that contractors such as IT and management consultants who work through their own company but are in practice employed by a third party, pay the right tax as employees."In the consultation document, it is stated that current legislation is not working effectively and the cost of non-compliance in the private sector is high and growing and projected to increase from £700 million in 2017/18 to £1.2 billion in 2022/23. The consultation document also claimed that the genuinely self-employed will not be affected.Financial Secretary to the Treasury, Mel Stride, commented, "It's very important that we recognise the hard work of contractors across all sectors, who contribute to our growing economy. But it's also right that we have a fair tax system that balances efficiency and simplicity for taxpayers, while also supporting our vital public services. That's why we're consulting carefully and welcome a wide range of opinions and evidence on how to tackle non-compliance."Whatever reforms are eventually put in place, there remain concerns that HMRC does not have the right resources to enforce IR35 rules. Last week, an IT contractor working through an agency on a government contract won an IR35 case against the HMRC.Barrow commented, "There will be a lot of discussion about this in the next few months and it will be interesting to see the government's response, and whether the final legislation can stem this rising tide of independent assessments."Dave Chaplin, CEO of ContractorCalculator, commented on the consultation, "The audacity of HMRC to release this consultation within days of being heavily defeated on IR35 by a contractor in court is incredulous. How can HMRC be expected or trusted to educate the private sector to assess the employment status of workers when they cannot even get it right themselves. If this goes ahead it will be a complete car crash.Seb Maley, Qdos Contractor CEO, commented, “This consultation is an opportunity for the Government to thoroughly and honestly review the impact private sector reform could have on contractors, engagers and the many other parties in the supply chain.The Recruitment and Employment Confederation also commented on the consultation with REC Director of Policy Tom Hadley stating, “We support the government’s efforts to improve compliance and ensure everyone pays the right amount of tax but are concerned that the government wants to proceed with reforms which would cause significant upheaval to private sector employers and recruiters. This consultation is a good opportunity to rectify issues such as those with the CEST (check employment status for tax) tool which have been flagged by recruiters.”“We are pleased to see the government acknowledge that the public sector needed more time to prepare and adapt to the public sector changes,” Hadley said. “The government needs to learn from this and ensure that there is sufficient time for the implementation of any reforms, introducing changes in April 2019 would be premature. We do not want to see a repeat of the public sector chaos. We look forward to gathering members views and representing our industry on this issue over the coming months.”Barrow added, "We believe that, on balance, it is more likely than not that the new regime will come into force in April 2019, and that it will be modelled in large part on the existing public sector regime. Yes there are defects in the current public sector regime but we think it more likely than not that  the government will press on, and hope to iron out the problems by slightly amending relevant provisions of the existing regime and adding some extra powers for HMRC (and perhaps extra penalties for end users)." […]

  • UK – Healthcare staffing provider Independent Clinical Services acquires ProClinical

    UK-based healthcare staffing provider Independent Clinical Services announced that it has acquired ProClinical Limited, a pharmaceutical and life science recruitment agency based out of London.No financial details of the transaction were disclosed. ProClinical states that it supplies highly qualified specialist professionals in both contract and permanent roles to a wide range of customers across the life sciences sector. The group operates across the US, Europe and Asia and is a member of the Association of Professional Staffing Companies, Swiss Staffing and the American Staffing Association. ProClinical CEO Daniel Smart commented, "ProClinical has successfully expanded our high-quality services to life sciences customers across the world. We are excited about the future investment and support that ICS will bring which will enable us to build on this track record to develop new services on a truly global scale.”Richard MacMillan, CEO of ICS, also commented, “There is ever-growing demand for professionals with highly sought-after skills across the life sciences sector. With a network of seven offices across five countries, ProClinical complements the ICS life sciences staffing brand, Hobson Prior. The combination of two strong organisations will give ICS an excellent platform to invest and grow in the global life science staffing market. Through Hobson Prior and ProClinical, ICS is now operating in the US, China, Singapore, Australia, Switzerland, Continental Europe and the UK.”ICS ranks number one on SIA’s list of the Largest Healthcare Staffing Firms in Europe. […]

  • UK – Permanent placements up by 9% in April, while contractor vacancies drop 9%

    Professional recruitment firms in the UK reported that the number of candidates securing permanent roles in April 2018 increased by 9% year-on-year, according to new survey data from the Association of Professional Staffing Companies.APSCo’s research found notable variations between the trade association’s core sector groups in terms of hiring activity. While permanent placements within financial services and IT increased by 19% and 10% respectively over the 12-month period, the number of marketing professionals securing permanent roles during this time slipped by 10%.Meanwhile, vacancies for permanent staff, fell by 2%, year-on-year, in April.APSCo’s data also showed that the number of contract professionals out on assignment in the finance sector rose 1% over the same period.Vacancies for permanent finance professionals during this time grew by 10% while demand for contractors within financial services rose 20%.Placements within the engineering sector, meanwhile, remained steady, increasing by 0.2% year-on-year. Demand for engineering professionals to work on both a permanent and contract basis dipped by 7% in the year to April 2018 while the number of contractors out on assignment in the sector also decreased by 7% during this period.John Nurthen, Staffing Industry Analysts’ Executive Director of Global Research commented on APSCo’s data, “The continued improvement in permanent hiring for professional staff is unsurprising set against a positive UK employment rate of 1.2% for the first quarter of 2018. While this is good news, it does mask some challenges in the labour market such as declining public sector employment and severe skills shortages for highly skilled professionals.” Despite ongoing demand for finance interims, overall contract vacancies dipped by 9% year-on-year in April 2018. The overall number of contractors out on assignment, meanwhile, dipped by 17% during the same period. APSCo stated that this can largely be attributed to a 35% year-on-year fall in IT professionals working on a contract basis during this time.  APSCo’s figures also found that median salaries across all professional sectors dipped by 1.1% year-on-year. The IT and insurance recorded uplifts of 3.4% and 2.9%, respectively.Ann Swain, Chief Executive of APSCo commented, “While permanent professional hiring activity remains strong across the board, there is no escaping the influence that Brexit uncertainty continues to hold over the sectors our members recruit into. While financial services is clearly emerging from the period of hesitancy it found itself in post-referendum, it now seems the engineering sector may be putting the brakes on hiring until there is more clarity around trade borders.”“The strength in permanent recruitment levels is also offset against a significant dip in contractor demand,” Swain said. “And, with the publication of the long-awaited consultation on off-payroll working in the private sector just published, this trend looks set to continue.&rdquo […]

  • Middle East – Monster Employment Index: Jobs in technology sector report increase in online recruitment

    The UAE's software, hardware and telecom occupations recorded an increase of 20% in April when compared to the same period last year, according to the latest Monster Employment Index.The index is a monthly gauge of online job hiring activity by Monster.com, which records the industries and occupations that show the highest and lowest growth.According to Monster Gulf, this increase in online recruitment within the tech sector is in line with the digital transformation which is currently dominating the UAE.“With the significant advancements of technology, growth of the e-commerce market, and demand for other digital services, there has, in turn, been an increase in demand for specialised professionals who can support this fast-paced development,” the report stated.Abhijeet Mukherjee, Chief Executive Officer, Monster.com, APAC & Middle East, commented, “Digital transformation is taking over the majority of disciplines in the emirates, revolutionising most industries as they implement technology into everyday operations and their reliance on technology grows heavier. As this path continues, and we are faced with changes in demand brought on by the Fourth Revolution, we will undoubtedly see a growing need for more talent in these fields.”Among the occupations to register a decline in online recruitment in April include HR & Admin Occupations (-45%), and Sales and business development (-36%).Meanwhile, in Saudi Arabia, the Software, Hardware and Telecom occupations recorded a 36% increase in online recruitment in April when compared to last year. Monster Gulf added that the rise in occupations in these areas is in line with the nation-wide digital transformation initiative as part of the Vision 2030.“With digital transformation being a key pillar of the Kingdom’s Vision 2030, it’s no surprise that the results of the index have shown an increase in occupations related to the industry. Digitisation is impacting every sector from health care to tourism and has resulted in a growth of new jobs and demand for associated skills,” Mukherjee said. […]

  • Global – The case for contingent work made by Staffing Industry Analysts

    Staffing Industry Analysts has published a new research report looking at the positive aspects of contingent work from the perspective of employers, workers and society in general.Available exclusively to SIA’s research subscribers, the report makes the case in favour of five categories of contingent workers: temporary agency workers, other (directly sourced) temporary workers, human cloud workers, independent contractors and statement of work consultants.John Nurthen, executive director global research at Staffing Industry Analysts and author of the report said: “as contingent work has become more prominent, concerns and criticism have also become more vocal. While we recognise that not all contingent work is good in the same way that not all employed work is good, there are many positives to contingent ways of working that should not be overlooked.”The report makes the point that it would be wrong to assume that employers are always in the driver’s seat when determining who they employ and who they engage on a contingent basis. Highly skilled workers may only be prepared to offer their services on a contingent basis, regardless of whether an employer wishes to employ them or not. Flexibility is a two-way street, and many contingent workers proactively choose this way of working to suit their lifestyle or in order to meet family obligations.The report also looks at the problem of worker categorisation given that the world of work is fluid and many workers will supplement their employed income with different forms of contingent work – and contingent workers themselves may cross categories multiple times – independent contractors taking on occasional temporary agency work assignments or temporary agency workers dabbling in human cloud roles.The report concludes that it is important legislation should be modernised to better address multiplicity in the labour market and to create a level-playing field between labour market intermediaries. […]

  • Hong Kong – Majority of jobseekers turn down their first-choice jobs because hiring process ‘takes too long’

    Hong Kong jobseekers say they lose interest in a role if the hiring process takes too long, according to research from Robert Half.The research showed that 72% of jobseekers have accepted a second-choice job offer because their preferred employer took too long to make a hiring decision. More than half, or 54%, of candidates have waited longer than a month to hear back about a role for which they have interviewed, while 27% have waited longer than six weeks, and 21% even over two months.This contrasts with candidates’ expectations of the hiring process as 88% believe it is reasonable to wait up to one month from initial application to getting a final offer, while 12% think it’s acceptable to wait for over a month.“Hong Kong companies are in a fierce war for talent and are competing to find the right skills and talent. To take their business forward, employers cannot afford to alienate potential workers with long drawn-out hiring processes,” Adam Johnston, Managing Director of Robert Half Hong Kong, said.“High-calibre jobseekers know they are in demand, so the fact that so many of Hong Kong’s jobseekers are turning down their dream job because they’ve been left waiting for so long is concerning,” Johnston said. “The process of narrowing down candidates during the hiring process can be time-consuming. However, if hiring mangers fail to adapt their recruitment process to the expectations of today’s candidates, they will increase the risk of losing out on the best talent on the market.&rdquo […]

  • Singapore – Ministry of Manpower charges employer for failing to ensure safety of worker

    Singapore’s Ministry of Manpower charged an employer in the State Courts for failing to provide safe working conditions for her foreign domestic worker.Investigations revealed that between early June and 4 July 2017, the accused instructed her Foreign Domestic Worker, on four different occasions, to clean the glass ceiling, located at the second level of the accused’s house. To perform the assigned task, the worker had to stand on the glass ceiling which extended over the porch area of the house. The Ministry stated that by instructing the worker to perform such dangerous acts, the accused endangered the worker’s life.The Ministry stopped the worker from working for the accused and imposed an interim employment ban while investigations were ongoing.The employer, 36-year-old Belinda Huber, was accused of violating the Work Permit Conditions and committed an offence under the Employment of Foreign Manpower Act. If convicted, Huber could be fined up to SGD 10,000 (USD 7,400) or imprisoned for up to a year, or both. […]

  • South Korea – Parliament to dedicate extra budget to create more jobs among youth (Xinhua)

    South Korea's parliament today passed an extra budget plan worth USD 3.5 billion to help create jobs especially among youths, reports Xinhua. President Moon Jae-in’s government submitted the supplementary budget plan on 6 April 2018 and it was passed through the National Assembly today. About half of the budget will be spent on creating jobs for the younger generation and helping establish venture companies. President Moon Jae-in has placed job creation among youths a priority in his management of state affairs. Youth unemployment in South Korea stood at 12% in March. The extra budget will also be spent helping with laid-off workers in southern regions, where key shipbuilders were under restructuring. […]

Latest Research

  • MSP Model Overview

    A service segment of the process outsourcing industry, Managed Service Provision (MSP) is a service whereby a company takes on primary responsibility for managing an organisation’s contingent workforce program. Typical responsibilities of an MSP include overall program management, reporting and tracking, supplier selection and management, order distribution and often consolidated billing. The majority of MSPs also provide their clients with a vendor management system (VMS) and may have a physical presence on the client’s site. An MSP may or may not be independent of a staffing supplier. The complex global legal landscape inevitably makes buyers of contingent labour cautious about rolling out an MSP internationally. However, while there are certainly legal considerations to take into account, they should not prevent programme managers from expanding programmes into any country they wish. Despite prohibitions on MSPs acting as intermediaries in some countries, it is possible to overcome these by structuring agreements whereby the MSP sits beside the relationship between the buyer and supplier of contingent labor rather than between them. This report outlines MSP models that can be used successfully in some of the main staffing markets across the globe. This report should be read in conjunction with SIA’s ‘Market Developments Summary’ report. To download the full report, click below: MSP Model Overview 20180521 - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • The Case for Contingent Work

    Key Findings There are multiple ways in which the different categories of contingent work can benefit employers, workers and society. It should not be assumed that employers are always in the driver’s seat when determining who they employ and who they engage on a contingent basis. Highly skilled workers may only be prepared to offer their services on a contingent basis, regardless of whether an employer wishes to employ them or not. Flexibility is a two-way street, and many contingent workers proactively choose this way of working to suit their lifestyle or in order to meet family obligations. The world of work is fluid and many workers will supplement their employed income with different forms of contingent work – and contingent workers themselves may cross categories multiple times –independent contractors taking on occasional temporary agency work assignments or temporary agency workers dabbling in human cloud roles. Compared to unregulated informal work, the rights and protections afforded by contingent work are a considerable improvement, and the growth of properly regulated contingent work in emerging economies is better perceived as real social progress rather than undermining the status of employed workers. Freelancing via an online staffing platform can be a way to provide the dignity and security of work among the most impoverished communities in the world. It would be foolish to suggest that all contingent work is good, for the same reasons that it would be foolish to say that all employed work is good. Exploitation and poor working conditions exist across all forms of work; bad employers will always try to cut corners regardless of the type of contract under which work is being supplied. To download the complete report, please select the following link:  The Case for Contingent Work 20180517 - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • Independent Contractor Legal Analysis Under Federal and State Law

    Key Findings Appropriately classifying workers as employees or independent contractors is one of the single-most important decisions that a business makes. Many different laws, both state and federal establish tests for employee versus independent contractor status.  Companies are under steady scrutiny from federal and state governments regarding alleged misclassification of workers as independent contractors. To download the full report, click below: Independent Contractor Legal Analysis under Federal and State Law_05162018 - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • Largest Direct Hire Firms Globally

    The global direct hire market accounted for 6.2% of the Staffing market in 2017.The Americas and Asia Pacific were the two largest regions for direct hire. The United States was the largest national market in 2017, accounting for 42% of the global market.This report provides a ranking of the 20 largest providers of direct hire services globally, based on revenues generated in 2017. The largest global provider was PageGroup, followed by Adecco and ManpowerGroup.Finally, we also provide an overview of the latest trends, based on data published by the largest publicly-listed providers in this space.To download a full copy of the report, click below: Largest Direct Hire Firms Globally 20180514 - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • MSP Model Overview

    A service segment of the process outsourcing industry, Managed Service Provision (MSP) is a service whereby a company takes on primary responsibility for managing an organisation’s contingent workforce program. Typical responsibilities of an MSP include overall program management, reporting and tracking, supplier selection and management, order distribution and often consolidated billing. The majority of MSPs also provide their clients with a vendor management system (VMS) and may have a physical presence on the client’s site. An MSP may or may not be independent of a staffing supplier. The complex global legal landscape inevitably makes buyers of contingent labour cautious about rolling out an MSP internationally. However, while there are certainly legal considerations to take into account, they should not prevent programme managers from expanding programmes into any country they wish. Despite prohibitions on MSPs acting as intermediaries in some countries, it is possible to overcome these by structuring agreements whereby the MSP sits beside the relationship between the buyer and supplier of contingent labour rather than between them. This report outlines MSP models that can be used successfully in some of the main staffing markets across the globe. This report should be read in conjunction with SIA’s ‘Market Developments Summary’ report. To download the full report, click below: MSP Model Overview 20180521 - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • The Case for Contingent Work

    Key Findings There are multiple ways in which the different categories of contingent work can benefit employers, workers and society. It should not be assumed that employers are always in the driver’s seat when determining who they employ and who they engage on a contingent basis. Highly skilled workers may only be prepared to offer their services on a contingent basis, regardless of whether an employer wishes to employ them or not. Flexibility is a two-way street, and many contingent workers proactively choose this way of working to suit their lifestyle or in order to meet family obligations. The world of work is fluid and many workers will supplement their employed income with different forms of contingent work – and contingent workers themselves may cross categories multiple times –independent contractors taking on occasional temporary agency work assignments or temporary agency workers dabbling in human cloud roles. Compared to unregulated informal work, the rights and protections afforded by contingent work are a considerable improvement, and the growth of properly regulated contingent work in emerging economies is better perceived as real social progress rather than undermining the status of employed workers. Freelancing via an online staffing platform can be a way to provide the dignity and security of work among the most impoverished communities in the world. It would be foolish to suggest that all contingent work is good, for the same reasons that it would be foolish to say that all employed work is good. Exploitation and poor working conditions exist across all forms of work; bad employers will always try to cut corners regardless of the type of contract under which work is being supplied. To download the complete report, please select the following link:  The Case for Contingent Work 20180517 - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • Largest Direct Hire Firms Globally

    The global direct hire market accounted for 6.2% of the Staffing market in 2017.The Americas and Asia Pacific were the two largest regions for direct hire. The United States was the largest national market in 2017, accounting for 42% of the global market.This report provides a ranking of the 20 largest providers of direct hire services globally, based on revenues generated in 2017. The largest global provider was PageGroup, followed by Adecco and ManpowerGroup.Finally, we also provide an overview of the latest trends, based on data published by the largest publicly-listed providers in this space.To download a full copy of the report, click below: Largest Direct Hire Firms Globally 20180514 - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • Directory of Suppliers to Staffing Firms 2018

    This report identifies and categorizes specialist suppliers to staffing firms globally. With 23 different categories ranging from advisors & consultants to payroll funding and back office,with approximately 900 vendors spanning over 60 countries.The Directory provides a comprehensive range of solutions and services that staffing firms may require to operate their businesses more efficiently and more effectively.  Directory of Suppliers to Staffing Firms 2018 - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • MSP Model Overview

    A service segment of the process outsourcing industry, Managed Service Provision (MSP) is a service whereby a company takes on primary responsibility for managing an organisation’s contingent workforce program. Typical responsibilities of an MSP include overall program management, reporting and tracking, supplier selection and management, order distribution and often consolidated billing. The majority of MSPs also provide their clients with a vendor management system (VMS) and may have a physical presence on the client’s site. An MSP may or may not be independent of a staffing supplier. The complex global legal landscape inevitably makes buyers of contingent labour cautious about rolling out an MSP internationally. However, while there are certainly legal considerations to take into account, they should not prevent programme managers from expanding programmes into any country they wish. Despite prohibitions on MSPs acting as intermediaries in some countries, it is possible to overcome these by structuring agreements whereby the MSP sits beside the relationship between the buyer and supplier of contingent labor rather than between them. This report outlines MSP models that can be used successfully in some of the main staffing markets across the globe. This report should be read in conjunction with SIA’s ‘Market Developments Summary’ report. To download the full report, click below: MSP Model Overview 20180521 - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • The Case for Contingent Work

    Key Findings There are multiple ways in which the different categories of contingent work can benefit employers, workers and society. It should not be assumed that employers are always in the driver’s seat when determining who they employ and who they engage on a contingent basis. Highly skilled workers may only be prepared to offer their services on a contingent basis, regardless of whether an employer wishes to employ them or not. Flexibility is a two-way street, and many contingent workers proactively choose this way of working to suit their lifestyle or in order to meet family obligations. The world of work is fluid and many workers will supplement their employed income with different forms of contingent work – and contingent workers themselves may cross categories multiple times –independent contractors taking on occasional temporary agency work assignments or temporary agency workers dabbling in human cloud roles. Compared to unregulated informal work, the rights and protections afforded by contingent work are a considerable improvement, and the growth of properly regulated contingent work in emerging economies is better perceived as real social progress rather than undermining the status of employed workers. Freelancing via an online staffing platform can be a way to provide the dignity and security of work among the most impoverished communities in the world. It would be foolish to suggest that all contingent work is good, for the same reasons that it would be foolish to say that all employed work is good. Exploitation and poor working conditions exist across all forms of work; bad employers will always try to cut corners regardless of the type of contract under which work is being supplied. To download the complete report, please select the following link:  The Case for Contingent Work 20180517 - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • Largest Direct Hire Firms Globally

    The global direct hire market accounted for 6.2% of the Staffing market in 2017.The Americas and Asia Pacific were the two largest regions for direct hire. The United States was the largest national market in 2017, accounting for 42% of the global market.This report provides a ranking of the 20 largest providers of direct hire services globally, based on revenues generated in 2017. The largest global provider was PageGroup, followed by Adecco and ManpowerGroup.Finally, we also provide an overview of the latest trends, based on data published by the largest publicly-listed providers in this space.To download a full copy of the report, click below: Largest Direct Hire Firms Globally 20180514 - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • Directory of Suppliers to Staffing Firms 2018

    This report identifies and categorizes specialist suppliers to staffing firms globally. With 23 different categories ranging from advisors & consultants to payroll funding and back office,with approximately 900 vendors spanning over 60 countries.The Directory provides a comprehensive range of solutions and services that staffing firms may require to operate their businesses more efficiently and more effectively.  Directory of Suppliers to Staffing Firms 2018 - You do not have permission to view this object. […]